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Remembered Today:

Embarkation to the Front Line (Winter 1914/15)


Tiger57
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Hello all,

I would like to know how long it took a soldier to reach his unit, in the front line, after embarkation in England during the winter of 1914/15.

I am aware that later in the war this process could take some time.

Thanks for your help.

Tiger57

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Tiger57,

My impression is that from the south coast ports, the cross-channel time is only a matter of hours (Newhaven) or overnight. Longer if the transport left from Liverpool, Manchester etc. For example, my grandfather's regt. embarked at Southampton, the ship sailed at 11:30 pm (12-Aug-14) and arrived at Le Havrre at 11:30 am the following day.

He was in a draft that landed in France on 11-Jan-15, and went straight into the trenches on arrival at his regmt. on 13-Jan-15.

Regards,

JMB

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JMB,

Thanks for your reply.

My Great Uncle also embarked at Southampton on 11th December and arrived in France the following day, so it seems he had a very similar trip. I was expecting the number of days from landing to front line during the 14/15 winter period would be short and your grandfathers experience indicates it was.

Many thanks,

Tiger57

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Hi Tiger.

My Great Uncle landed in France (Le Havre) on the 4/12/1914 as a Special Reservist (Royal Fusiliers) with 29 other Special Reservists (Royal Fusiliers) and was in the front line with the 1st Battalion Royal Fusiliers by the 8/12/1914 at a place called Wez-Maquart. Only 4 days.

Regards Andy

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Hi Tiger.

My Great Uncle landed in France (Le Havre) on the 4/12/1914 as a Special Reservist (Royal Fusiliers) with 29 other Special Reservists (Royal Fusiliers) and was in the front line with the 1st Battalion Royal Fusiliers by the 8/12/1914 at a place called Wez-Maquart. Only 4 days.

Regards Andy

At a time when every experienced man who could be spared was being sent out to the front.

Craig

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