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Who is This ? ? ?


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Well if he was an Avocat I therefore presume he defended, prosecuted or sentenced someone who was executed?

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Thanks for the clue. I wondered about Édouard Clunet, who defended Margaretha Zelle, but he has the disadvantage of not looking like your photograph in any I can find......

 

Pete.

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He prosecuted a number of high profile individuals, of both wars. When he wasn’t doing that, in the First war he “put before the firing squad rebels and deserters and soldiers” pour encourages les autres; during the Second he was in a senior position with a legal body responsible for depriving Jews of their French nationality.

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1 hour ago, Fattyowls said:

Thanks for the clue. I wondered about Édouard Clunet, who defended Margaretha Zelle, but he has the disadvantage of not looking like your photograph in any I can find......

 

Pete.

Given U.G.'s latest revelations about his c.v. I would favour him more likely to be the prosecutor, ie Pierre Bouchardon, but again the face appears not to fit. Perhaps the judge who sentenced her then. A person I have not identified as yet.

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24 minutes ago, neverforget said:

but again the face appears not to fit

 

Story of my life.......

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17 minutes ago, neverforget said:

 ... Perhaps the judge who sentenced her then ...

 
Non. In that characteristically beguiling French way he was, in the Second war a la fois collaborateur et resistant.

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1 hour ago, neverforget said:

Given U.G.'s latest revelations about his c.v. I would favour him more likely to be the prosecutor, ie Pierre Bouchardon, but again the face appears not to fit. Perhaps the judge who sentenced her then. A person I have not identified as yet.


Non. Car Bouchardon n’etait pas le seul procureur.

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7 minutes ago, Uncle George said:


Non. Car Bouchardon n’etait pas le seul procureur.

This came up on a search for "prosecutors Mata Hari trial"

Nevertheless, as was later shown by André Mornet, the substitute prosecutor during Mata Hari’s trial, her being charged for spying, he said, “wasn’t worth getting worked up over.”?

https://www.france24.com/en/20171015-mata-hari-spy-who-wasnt-really-spy

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26 minutes ago, neverforget said:

This came up on a search for "prosecutors Mata Hari trial"

Nevertheless, as was later shown by André Mornet, the substitute prosecutor during Mata Hari’s trial, her being charged for spying, he said, “wasn’t worth getting worked up over.”?

https://www.france24.com/en/20171015-mata-hari-spy-who-wasnt-really-spy


Yes. Mornet it was who said of proof in that trial, that he had not enough to flog a cat. Mornet later prosecuted Pierre Laval, the Head of Government of the Vichy regime. Laval was found guilty of collaboration with the enemy and shot by firing squad in 1945.

 

But of more significance to members of this Forum, Mornet lead the prosecution of Philippe Petain in 1945. As is well known, Petain was found guilty of treason and sentenced to death, which sentence was commuted by de Gaulle to life imprisonment.

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Well done. I looked at a good few Mata Hari references and didn't see his picture.

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13 minutes ago, jonbem said:

Well done. I looked at a good few Mata Hari references and didn't see his picture.

I didn't see a picture of him anywhere either. The extra clue and that piece of text gave him up. I still didn't know if it was him or not though. 

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22 hours ago, jonbem said:

Try this one.

image.png.7a88c66d9ecfff22ffddaf30be55ebe5.png

Born in Yorkshire, employed in Lancashire before the war

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On 16/05/2021 at 20:24, jonbem said:

Born in Yorkshire, employed in Lancashire before the war

Still no takers?

try 94 in 257.

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32 minutes ago, jonbem said:

Still no takers?

try 94 in 257.

Hmm. I think I may have got your drift. 

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Gotta. Eddie Latheron. His record on wiki actually states slightly differently: 2 goals for England to his credit as well.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eddie_Latheron

Years Team Apps (Gls)
–1906 Grangetown Athletic    
1906–1917 Blackburn Rovers 258 (94)
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12 minutes ago, neverforget said:

I think I may have got your drift

 

I'm reminded of Mae West's classic line "I used to be Snow White but I drifted". I thought I knew the face and I'd worked out he was a footballer but I was not even close.  The cunning crop of the photo took out the blue and white halves of the Blackburn shirt. Good post, and maybe one for a visit if I'm in the area.

 

Pete.

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Well on

Eddie Latheron - Blackburn, Football and the First World War

image.png.f41faa8a09a826585e7c4a074b5b4907.png

First World War Service

Gunner 160461 Latheron joined the Royal Field Artillery (RFA) in 1916 and was subsequently posted to No. 2 Depot in Preston, Lancashire. Once there, Gnr Latheron soon found himself playing football again and he would take part in an inter-county match between Lancashire and Yorkshire-based army sides in mid-1916.

 

On Wednesday 24 October 1917, the Liverpool Echo reported Latheron’s death, quoting a letter written by his Rovers teammate, Alex McGhie, who was also serving on the Western Front. In it, he said:

A shell burst near their dugout and the splinters, passing through the opening, killed Latheron and another gunner. Latheron was happy and strong and was a tremendous worker, and if anybody has done his bit in this war it is he. We are going out of action tomorrow, and intended to have a good time.

Latheron was subsequently buried at Vlamertinghe New Military Cemetery, which is located 5 Kms west of the Belgian town of Ypres. In March 1918, Latheron’s widow, Bertha, was authorised effects to the total of £4 8s 6d by the army before being given another £4 in December 1919.

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Good one Jon.

 

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How about this chap then? Also met a sad end, albeit whilst he was away from the action.

20210518_184949.jpg.3a2c76cf02d509027ac833e0f5c3ca41.jpg

 

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Well spotted, I thought that might be a useful addition. Wouldn't have helped me much, I am useless when it comes to uniforms/most things.

I will also add that he served as an M.P. in the House of Commons, though that clue might not be as helpful as it may appear at first glance.😉

He raised a battalion. 

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Grasping at photo interpretation now, cap badge possibly?

image.png.5956ca21101d5d6d669cbfea0489b25a.png

image.png.18e3cdbf63a177d0178e0294b0869297.pngimage.png.4f0b0eb8c105db2cd438c072f51bca43.png

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Not too clear is it? The battalion he raised was actually a regular infantry battalion which embarked on the Western Front in February 1917. It saw extensive action in F and F until the end of the war.

 

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