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Who is This ? ? ?


Stoppage Drill
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hmm... elder gentleman... FWW probably not his first time on the battlefield... Boer war veteran??? 

Insignia ... Green Howards??? 

I have a feeling of recent deja-vu but can't place it... 

 

M.

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2 minutes ago, Marilyne said:

hmm... elder gentleman... FWW probably not his first time on the battlefield... Boer war veteran??? 

Insignia ... Green Howards??? 

I have a feeling of recent deja-vu but can't place it... 

 

M.

I definitely recognise his face, but can't put a name to it, which is what it's all about of course.🤔

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one tiny clue, please, Mr Jonbem??? 

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Oh I don't know about that. It might be like putting the cart before the horse. :rolleyes:

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28 minutes ago, Marilyne said:

Boer war veteran

He did have a couple of years there.

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That is Mark Sykes, best known along with M. Picot of the Quai d'Orsay as the man who carved up the near east between the British and French empires. I too recognised the face but the name just popped into my head, which suggests that there is activity in there. I'm quite pleased about that.

 

Pete.

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Yes that is the man. Well done.

Mark Sykes - Wikipedia

Became an MP in 1911, (when the MPs began to get an allowance of £400 - although I don't think he needed it))

He also set up the Waggoners Special Reserve, who were some of the first men into the Great War in 1914.

Wagoners' Memorial - Wikipedia

A number of my maternal ancestors were emplyed in farming in the area around Sledmere, and several of varying related distances (maybe around 20) were attested into that unit.

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I knew I recognised him. Well done Pete.

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Well done!! 

But it is not the "theme" that rang a bell!! 

 

M.

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I'm pretty sure that it will be the Green Howards, the Sykes' were neighbours of the Howard Earls of Carlisle over at Castle Howard to the east. As to themes, mention of Castle Howard has started the music from the TV version of 'Brideshead Revisited' circulating in my brain. Unusual amounts of synaptic activity, and I've only had one cup of coffee too.

 

Pete.

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In 1897 he was commissioned into the 3rd (Militia) Battalion of the Green Howards

XIX-cap-badge.jpg

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Thanks Jon.

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Got it !!! 

His body was exhumed about 15 years ago at the height of the bird flu... they thought they could find a strain of the Spanish flu on his body, as he had been buried in a lead coffin. I read something about it when researching a bit more about the spanish flu and of course it came up with the ongoing epidemic 

 

A cure for flu (from beyond the grave) | The Independent | The Independent

 

M.

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Good article there, thanks for the link.

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I'll give you two pictures of the same fellow, which are clues enough for you clever lot.

20210503_200342.jpg.08308c6d11c86c0ebd3e51c51a59ab44.jpg

20210503_200308.jpg.ed0dff705e6d6469d4edcaebca1c9976.jpg

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I took one look at the first picture and thought Dudley Moore, or possibly Chris de Burgh, and now I can't get the appalling 'Lady in Red' out of my mind. None of which is conducive to identification.

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11 minutes ago, Fattyowls said:

I took one look at the first picture and thought Dudley Moore, or possibly Chris de Burgh, and now I can't get the appalling 'Lady in Red' out of my mind. None of which is conducive to identification.

Oh dear, that's something I wouldn't do to my worst enemy. A compensation clue then: You will have deduced that he had both sailoring and soldiering to his name. I wish I could say that he was also a tinker or a tailor, but alas the only tinkering he did was with words, which he tailored into the form of books. 

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32 minutes ago, neverforget said:

A compensation clue

 

More like a compensation claim; I'm psychologically scarred. Where there's blame........

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8 hours ago, neverforget said:

You will have deduced that he had both sailoring and soldiering to his name. I wish I could say that he was also a tinker or a tailor, but alas the only tinkering he did was with words, which he tailored into the form of books. 

An author/writer/poet then? I'll have todo some sleuthing.

Edited by jonbem
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Although this looks a bit similar, Wilfed Owen, I don't think it is him pic from HERE

 

Portrait of Wilfred Owen wearing his military uniform in 1916. (Getty Images)

Edited by jonbem
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Morning all. 

Yes, soldier, sailor, author and poet. He was also a very muscular athlete, and boxer. 

Invalided out following an injury, he reinlisted and was killed shortly afterwards. 

Hope that helps.

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45 minutes ago, neverforget said:

poet

Not Rupert Brooke, or a friend of his, St John Welles Lucas (a relative of mine - 4th cousin 2x removed)

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He did write poetry early on, but is definitely more celebrated as a novelist. He is not a "Great War poet".

He was killed in 1918. 

In early life he was bullied at sea because of his diminutive stature, which is why he worked on his physique and took up boxing. (Rings a bell). 

More later.

Edited by neverforget
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