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Remembered Today:

Stoppage Drill

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CarylW

I'm both interested and grateful Caryl; thanks for all the links. I've been meaning to look into them for years; I think that Horne in Price of Glory was where I came upon them first (but the memory could be playing tricks on me).

Pete.

I'm sure it was 'neverforget' posting one of the Lafayette pilots up in WIT(1) that made me want to read more about them. In a letter to his father, Victor Chapman tried to reassure him about his safety:

. 'Halloween 1915. I get the idea that you and Alec especially are wearing yourselves out worrying about the danger I'm in, or were rather when I was at the front and will again when I return. It's all very parental and I appreciate it, but I wish you would not because it rather takes the edge off and principally because it does not benefit me or anyone, This is the first thing that I have done that is worthwhile, or may ever do...' '...it's easier to pilot an aeroplane than drive an auto and far less dangerous than the driving I used to do daily at Cambridge...' His father was right to worry and sadly his worst fears came true.

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CarylW

Today I was emailed and then called by a journalist at BBC Wales today asking about how the identity of the unknown Officer in the portrait (posted by Ridgus on 16th April) was solved. Subsequently a journalist from WalesNews called and is interested in running the story. He spoke English properly so I gave him the rundown and stressed it was the collaborative effort of the GWF members, particularly those who are inmates at WIT. Hopefully some good press for GWF and WIT, with appropriate credits for the prime suspects.

Just FYI.

Excellent news Martin! Well it was a good 'un!

By the way, with this new thread and t'other being in Chit-Chat (the old thread used to be in 'Other') I noticed the other day before I logged in that this thread, and in fact the whole of Chit Chat is only visible to forum members, which is a shame .

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David Ridgus

Excellent news Martin! Well it was a good 'un!

By the way, with this new thread and t'other being in Chit-Chat (the old thread used to be in 'Other') I noticed the other day before I logged in that this thread, and in fact the whole of Chit Chat is only visible to forum members, which is a shame .

I thought the same thing Caryl. Still after our brief sojourn in Skindles, I suppose we should be thankful for small mercies!

Incidentally I have started the statistical analysis of WIT. It means I'm rereading the whole thread which is a long business although I'm enjoying it (especially skipman's almost limitless capacity for punning. Much missed Mike!). I've catalogued the first 150 characters (which only takes me to page 64) and I hadn't realised quite our dominant you, Mr Drill and I were in the early days. Of those 150 the three of us account for well over half and, into the bargain, we solved around a third of all the postings. It didn't seem to feel like that at the time. However I am now just starting to hit the period when khaki, Siege Gunner and Steve Marsdin seemed to answer all of them in seconds. I was also surprised at how early the 'Great Identification Scandal' was. It was only 15 pages in. I thought we had been going much longer.

Oh and first use of the term 'the Extensive Library'? Steven Broomfield post number 199.

Sorry in advance but I think I'm going to be even more statistically nerdy than ever over the next few weeks

David

Today I was emailed and then called by a journalist at BBC Wales today asking about how the identity of the unknown Officer in the portrait (posted by Ridgus on 16th April) was solved. Subsequently a journalist from WalesNews called and is interested in running the story. He spoke English properly so I gave him the rundown and stressed it was the collaborative effort of the GWF members, particularly those who are inmates at WIT. Hopefully some good press for GWF and WIT, with appropriate credits for the prime suspects.

Just FYI.

Great news Martin. You deserve all the praise going for such a feat of memory and investigation

David

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Guest

Excellent news Martin! Well it was a good 'un!

By the way, with this new thread and t'other being in Chit-Chat (the old thread used to be in 'Other') I noticed the other day before I logged in that this thread, and in fact the whole of Chit Chat is only visible to forum members, which is a shame .

Indeed. I was hoping to get the journalist to simply look at the thread but he couldn't see it which rather flummoxed me for a while...so I have had to cut and paste much of it.

MG

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Ron Clifton

Hello Martin

You should have persuaded him to join the Forum! Then he could gain a wider insight into Great War history, and you would have saved yourself what was presumably a massive cut and paste job.

Well done, though. It can only help to raise awareness of the Forum's profile and expertise.

Ron

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Uncle George

94 - no.2 is Etienne Clementel, French Finance Minister 1914. (?)

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David Ridgus

94 - no.2 is Etienne Clementel, French Finance Minister 1914. (?)

No. The 'money' was limitless, metaphorical and, for the recipients and many, many others disastrous

David

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Uncle George

No. The 'money' was limitless, metaphorical and, for the recipients and many, many others disastrous

David

Alright then. How about Edward Carter Preston, designer of the Dead Man's Penny? But no. Again, I forget we are dealing with a July Crisis figure.

I give up. Like everyone else, it seems.

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Steven Broomfield

Oh and first use of the term 'the Extensive Library'? Steven Broomfield post number 199.

Modesty insists I deny all credit. I merely swiped it from use it in tribute to another Forum member.

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David Ridgus

Alright then. How about Edward Carter Preston, designer of the Dead Man's Penny? But no. Again, I forget we are dealing with a July Crisis figure.

I give up. Like everyone else, it seems.

Well at least you were giving it a go UG :thumbsup: By the way I think, after a suitable lapse of time, Edward Preston will make a very good WIT.

Well anyway I think it's high time to identify my bed blockers so here goes.

Number 1 is von Jagow the German Foreign Minister. Another case of the wrong person in the wrong job at the wrong time. An academic who was a rubbish public speaker he misread signals from Pourtales (hence the weeping) and assumed Russia would blink if faced with an Austrian attack on Serbia.

Number 2 is Count Szogyeny the Austrian Ambassador to Berlin, who carried the infamous 'blank cheque' from the Kaiser to Franz Josef.

So after the brief and unsuccessful foray into international diplomacy it's back to chaps in uniforms with moustaches. Who is this distinguished fellow:

post-66715-0-22330800-1405973697_thumb.j

David

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Guest

That's a really annoying one David. I should know, but it's just not coming to me.

Kiggell? (he said with little confidence)

Mike

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David Ridgus

That's a really annoying one David. I should know, but it's just not coming to me.

Kiggell? (he said with little confidence)

Mike

Afraid not Mike. This chap took over from his predecessor in unusual circumstances and then held the post for the rest of the war

David

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Guest

For the dark bat of night hath flown. Better keep on topic or I will be 'huckled' by a Maude-rator

Mike

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Stoppage Drill

Marshall - who took over from Maude.

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Stoppage Drill

For the dark bat of night hath flown. Better keep on topic or I will be 'huckled' by a Maude-rator

Mike

Sorry, I deleted the post to which you refer. I had alluded to "Come into the Garden Maud . . . . "

Thinks to self: Never explain . . .

Maude got the screaming ab-dabs, so 'tis said, from drinking unsterilized milk, and popped his clogs in Baghdad.

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Stoppage Drill

A bit gonglight for a man of his seniority. Don't know the first one, but the others appear to be 1911 Coronation, Queen's South Africa, King's South Africa.

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David Ridgus

For the dark bat of night hath flown. Better keep on topic or I will be 'huckled' by a Maude-rator

Mike

Great to have the pun-machine that is skipman back on board.

David

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David Ridgus

Marshall - who took over from Maude.

And of course 'nuff respect to The Lord Protector (presuming honorifics are still allowed) for this spot

David

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Guest

Great to have the pun-machine that is skipman back on board.

David

You're too kind.

Well done Mr Drill.

David, did you get that from one of the archive.org books? I have seen it before.

Mike

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David Ridgus

You're too kind.

Well done Mr Drill.

David, did you get that from one of the archive.org books? I have seen it before.

Mike

Yes I did. I have another from the same source which I will post tomorrow.

David

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Stoppage Drill

This one may be a bit unfair. It is a well known photo, and IIRC I first saw it in Leon Wolff's "In Flanders Fields" in the late 1950s.

It cropped up time and again as a generic image of battlefield conditions in 1917, and eventually I saw the Vickers gunner (the man nearest the camera) named.

He hasn't got a wiki page, or anything like that, but I seem to recall that he survived the war and led a long life; the only man in the photograph to see the end of the war apparently. I think that after the photo became well known he came forward and identified himself.

I won't let it linger, you either know him or you don't.

Any takers ?

post-86463-0-88567500-1405979920_thumb.j

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Stoppage Drill

3 minutes Skippy ! Caramba !

I had remembered Le Brun, but not where I first saw him identified. After reading your post I pulled my copy of Macdonald off the shelf and I am reminded that there are several quotes from Le Brun, and more than one photo of him too.

Right then, try this 'un. I don't think we've had him before, but he has been a wrong answer along the Witline.

post-86463-0-59869800-1405981295_thumb.j

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Khaki

'Wild' Bill Donovan, later head of the OSS

khaki

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Stoppage Drill

'Wild' Bill Donovan, later head of the OSS

khaki

That's the man - and what a man !

"The Last Hero"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_J._Donovan

Anybody remember the TV series "O.S.S" ?

The voiceover to the opening credits, showing a parachuting agent has always stuck with me, "These were the men who fought the lonely war, the silent war, behind enemy lines" to a background of stirring music. Ron Randell played the action hero, and Lionel Murton (a Canadian I think, who frequently appeared in British films and TV when an authentic transatlantic accent was required) played "The Chief". As the action took place in London and Europe, I don't think Murton was representing Donovan, though I may be wrong at this distance in time.

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