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Remembered Today:

Percussion Timer Fuse


Martin Feledziak
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I have been looking at a great many fuse pages today in an attempt to establish the validity of this pleasing item.

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post-103138-0-00823200-1405542355_thumb.

I have seen many similar fuse set-ups but not one the same.. The very top bit appears steel.

The two rings are aluminium and all the other parts appear brass.

The bottom brass thread has been cut off just above where I have placed the 1917 penny.

Some similar fuse designs I have seen on the top of shrapnel shells.

I even read today that the British borrowed the fuse design from the German company Krupps in 1906.

It is such a nice piece of engineering and it is pleasing for me to look at today -- however if you think about it,

a hideous item otherwise,as it was constructed to take human life..

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Wow Torrey,

I am impressed with your knowledge, how do you know this ?

what feature gives you this clue..?

There are some markings on the other side which I will try to post later.

Briefly it states "ER 1917 ER"

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Wow Torrey,

I am impressed with your knowledge, how do you know this ?

what feature gives you this clue..?

There are some markings on the other side which I will try to post later.

Briefly it states "ER 1917 ER"

Hello, Martin -

The marking "Z. s.u.m. W.F." means "Zunder schwerer und mittler Wurf-Mine," revealing that your fuse was for a medium or heavy trench mortar shell. The "1917" indicates that it was made in 1917, of course, but "ER" is not in my list of manufacturers. Possiblily it stands for the Erfurt arsenal.

The Dutch website "The Western Front Museum" (www.westernfront.nl") will show this and other fuses under the sub-heading "Fuze types & markings." It is an excellent resource for WWI ordnance and related items.

Regards, Torrey

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Not sure about UK copying Krupp time fuzes. My understanding from Bethel's Modern Artillery in the Field (1911) is that UK Time & Percussion fuzes were an Armstrong design and were igniferious, whereas German designs seem to have favoured clockwork. However, the one pictured above does not seem to the Baker clockwork mechanism that Krupp used for artillery shells.

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