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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Sgt. 8766 Lawrence FLIXON


GrahamC

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Hi pals

Knowing how many of you like a challenge, perhaps you can help me out with this one:

Two years after moving from Derbyshire to Lincolnshire I have just got around to emptying another box which contained, among other bits, a "Soldiers Bible", which had been my late mother's, reputedly having belonged to a mate of her father's - Pt. William HENDLEY (see dedication below).

Inscriptions in the frontispiece of the Bible show that it belong to Pt (A/Sgt) Lawrence Flixon, 2/Lincolnshires, who lived just around the corner from where my grandfather lived. He was a serving soldier at the outbreak of War and entered France with his Bn. on 5 November 1914.

Lawrence survived the War, but his older brother, :poppy: Gnr. 90469 Wallace Flixon, R.H.A., died on 19 November 1918, presumably as a p.o.w., and is buried in Niederzwehren Cemetery.

According to LLT the 2/Lincs. were part of the 21st Division w.e.f. February 1918, serving on the Western Front. However, in the back of the Bible [see attached] it clearly states that on the 26 September 1918 Sgt L. Flixon was "At Sea" on board "H.M.T. Willochra".

This reference - here - recognises Pt. P.G. Ferreira, South African Inf., who died two days before Lawrence's Bible entry, on the 24 Sept., on the same boat, en route from South Africa to the UK.

Can any pal who has stayed with me so far cast any light on what Sgt. Flixon was doing on the boat travelling from South Africa?

:huh: All contributions gratefully received - many thanks for looking

Graham

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Hi Graham

Only bit of info. I can find is that Lawrence (Laurence) died in 1940 in Australia. Tree on Ancestry......still looking

Regards Barry

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Like a good mystery but I'm not close to solving this. Anyway, here is HMNZT no. 14 Willochra, built in 1913, in Wellington Bay (I think)

Mike

willochra-slnsw.pdf

Edited by Langdon
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Only pure guess work, but is it possible that the troopship had called in at a French port during its voyage and had collected men to take home on leave or injured

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I think Lawrence was returning from S. Africa - in Ancestry Outward Bound Passenger Lists there's a L/Sgt L Flixon aged 26 on board the "Gaika" from London to Cape Town, departed 7th Nov 1917..

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This does not answer the question, but he was the subject of a report in the Derby Daily Telegraph on June 12 1916

DERBY SERGEANT WOUNDED.

Machine Gun-sergt. Lawrence Flixon, of the Lincolnshire Regiment, has been wounded in action, and is now at the Lord Derby War Hospital, Warrington. Sergt. Flixon, whose home is 80, Franchise-street, enlisted in March, 1909, having before that been engaged at the Derby Post Office. He served at Aldershot, Portsmouth, Gibraltar, and Bermuda, the regiment leaving Bermuda for France in October, 1914. He has fought in most principal actions in northern France since that time. He was struck by a piece of spent shrapnel at the battle of Neuve Chapelle, but was not injured. He was made full sergeant after the battle of Loos, where he acquitted himself with conspicuous bravery. He was wounded in action on the 20th ult. at Vimy Ridge, receiving shrapnel wounds in the neck, shoulder, arm and leg.

His brother, Wallace, was remembered in the Derby Daily Telegraph on January 14 1919

ROLL OF HONOUR

FLIXON. - In loving memory of Gunner and Signaller Wallace Flixon, R.F.A., who died a prisoner of war in Germany, Nov. 19, 1918. - 80, Franchise-street.

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Many thanks, guys, for all the extra info. Looks like a brave guy, from the DDT report. But as Harry says, still doesn't explain why he was on the ship - wouldn't have gone to South Africa for convalescence, I suppose??

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Medical is cropping up. The "Gaika" (see my previous post) was a Hospital Transport ship in 1918. Could he have recovered from his wounds but only sufficiently enough to take on (as a Staff Sergeant) a non-combatant role?

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  • 1 year later...

I just acquired Wallace Flixon's 1914-1915 Star and Victory medals. They were being sold separately on eBay by an antique dealer in Virginia, USA. I'm glad I managed to keep them together, but unfortunately the British War Medal is missing; I fear it may have gone for scrap during the silver madness of the late 1970s.

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I just acquired Wallace Flixon's 1914-1915 Star and Victory medals. They were being sold separately on eBay by an antique dealer in Virginia, USA. I'm glad I managed to keep them together, but unfortunately the British War Medal is missing; I fear it may have gone for scrap during the silver madness of the late 1970s.

Hello

Only just read your post as I've been out of the country. Glad to know that at least two medals are around and in safe hands. Any chance of a photo of the medals to put with the Bible? It's odd isn't it - no real connection to this guy, but you get engrossed in his story.

Happy Christmas

Graham

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  • 1 year later...

Thank you to all who have posted on this thread, and to my cousin's husband for finding it and sending me the link. It's been absolutely fascinating for me to read, as Wallace and Lawrence Flixon are my great uncles. I attach a photo of the two of them, Wallace sitting, Lawrence standing.

 

 

IMG_1107.JPG

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  • 6 months later...

I'm currently engaged in carrying on the family tree research started by my late father, Peter Flixon, nephew of Laurence and Wallace. I would just like to question the date of death of Laurence Flixon quoted above as I believe it to be incorrect. Laurence can't have died in 1940 because he was on board the ship 'Asturias' to Australia from Southampton in February 1947, together with his wife Katherine. Records in Australia show that a Laurence Flixon died there on 4/8/1966.

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19 minutes ago, Wendy Flixon said:

I'm currently engaged in carrying on the family tree research started by my late father, Peter Flixon, nephew of Laurence and Wallace. I would just like to question the date of death of Laurence Flixon quoted above as I believe it to be incorrect. Laurence can't have died in 1940 because he was on board the ship 'Asturias' to Australia from Southampton in February 1947, together with his wife Katherine. Records in Australia show that a Laurence Flixon died there on 4/8/1966.

The death seems to have come from an Ancestry tree so someone there seems to have found a death in 1940 and assumed it was the same man. From a quick look I couldn't see the tree so the details may have been altered or the tree made private.

Craig

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  • 2 years later...

I have now obtained my Great Uncle Laurence’s death certificate from Australia and can confirm that his date of death was 4 August 1966, at the age of 73, in Adelaide. The 1940 entry on Ancestry was made by a distant cousin and is incorrect. I will be contacting her to get it amended now that I have the documentary evidence  - photo below.
You may also be interested to hear that I have now tracked down my Great Uncle Wallace’s missing British War Medal and that his 3 medals are now reunited and back with the family. A photo was requested which I will post below.

 

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F5276F2D-4D87-47D5-B5BE-0F1CE73E29A6.jpeg

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