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Remembered Today:

Strange collection of soldiers


museumtom
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I got a postcard sent to me with all sorts of different soldiers in it. Taken by Lambert Weston and Son, Folkestone, Dover an 39 Brompton Square, S.W.

It is not dated/ The writing on the lying soldier seems to be Belgin Sold. I have no idea what it could portray, any ideas lads please?

Image2_zps33233ce6.jpg

Image1_zps9aec7ddc.jpg

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The only ones with guns are not British.

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They are mixed British and Belgian soldiers in their early blue uniforms.

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The only ones with guns are not British.

But appear Belgian and many are German (without guns) Presumably during the opening stages of the war the Belgians took some prisoners. Were they transferred across the Channel as Belgium was over run?

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But appear Belgian and many are German (without guns) Presumably during the opening stages of the war the Belgians took some prisoners. Were they transferred across the Channel as Belgium was over run?

There are no Germans in this photo...

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Curiouser and curiouser.

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There are no Germans in this photo...

What about the guys wearing feldmutz?

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What about the guys wearing feldmutz?

What you are seeing as the feldmutz is, as I said back in post 4, part of the early blue Belgian soldiers uniform. Note most of them are clear enough to read the regimental number worn on the lower band, which is distinct to the Belgians, whereas the Germans used two cockardes. The cuff stripes, greatcoat styling, etc, etc, are all Belgian. The rifles visble also appear to be Belgian used Mausers.

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One of the numbers on a hat, looks like under a rosette like the Germans have on their hats is 13.

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The rifles visble also appear to be Belgian used Mausers.

The rifles are Belgian Mannlicher's

Are you sure Khaki? I compared it to the Belgian M1889 Mauser and it's a spot on match. Mannlichers typically have a strangely angled magazine base which is not present. What is visible is a slight projection in front of the magazine, which matches the Mauser. I did a comparison picture below to illustrate. Top is the most obvious rifle visible turned through 180 degrees, bottom is a known Belgian M1889 Mauser sized to match::

http://postimg.org/image/hssxbz8e7/

Belgian_Mauser_comparison_pic.jpg

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Looking at the building in the background i would say this was taken at Shorncliffe Camp early during WW1. These are Belguim soldiers who came over with the refugees, regrouped and returned to fight.

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Are you sure Khaki? I compared it to the Belgian M1889 Mauser and it's a spot on match. Mannlichers typically have a strangely angled magazine base which is not present. What is visible is a slight projection in front of the magazine, which matches the Mauser. I did a comparison picture below to illustrate. Top is the most obvious rifle visible turned through 180 degrees, bottom is a known Belgian M1889 Mauser sized to match::

http://postimg.org/image/hssxbz8e7/

Belgian_Mauser_comparison_pic.jpg

Yes Andrew,

you are correct, I don't know what I was thinking about to have come up with my 'hybrid' suggestion as no one mentioned Austrian's at all. I yield to your superior eye sight. well done !

:thumbsup:

khaki

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