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Remembered Today:

Weather on 23rd June 1914 in Northwest England


Mark Hone

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One of my occasional weird requests for information: can anyone provide me with details of the weather in the Manchester area for 23rd June 1914 and the days around? I assure you that it has a Great War connection. Any information will be gratefully received.

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Mark

I'll check the 1914 Bolton Evening News next Tuesday.

Brian

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From the British Newspaper Archives


Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser - Monday 22 June 1914

The Weather

Sunrise, 3.44 a.m. Sunset, 8.19 p.m.

Lighting-up Time 9.19 p.m.

New Moon: 23rd inst, 3.33 p.m.

Weather Forecast

England North West-Light to moderate; variable breezes, mainly Southerly and South-Westerly; generally fair to fine, but some local showers and mist; thunder in places; moderate temperatures.

Remarks: Variations of pressure are very slight and indefinite, and afford no indication of a material change in the weather conditions.




Manchester Evening News - Tuesday 23 June 1914

Forecast till 11 a.m. Tomorrow

Changeable

Manchester District, North Wales and General

Wind between westerly and north-westerly, light or moderate, fresh at times locally; changeable; some showers, fair intervals; day temperatures rather below normal.

General Inference There are no indications of any important modification in the pressure distribution, and further depressions are likely to pass over our islands from the west.

Mike

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The attached link from the Met Office archive might help in giving a general flavour of the UK weather at the time.

http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/media/pdf/o/t/Jun1914.pdf

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Thanks- not quite the 'flaming June' day I had imagined!

I have noticed that the weather was quite unsettled, at least in Perthshire on 4th August 1914, not the stifling hot Bank Holiday weather I imagined?

The Aberdeen Daily journal Monday 3/8/1914

Forecast for the 24 hours ending Monday night issued by meteorological office London Sunday 8.30 p.m.

A depression is passing across the north of Scotland, and a general rise of the barometer is in progress over the southern districts. There is no indications of the approach of another disturbance from the Atlantic.

Scotland, N, E, W, England N,E, E, SE (London and Channel) NW, SW, and Midland Counties, and Ireland N & S-The wind is likely to veer into the north-west quarter, blowing briskly at first, then moderating, with improving and cooler weather.

Western Channel and Bay-Westerly winds, fresh at times; sea moderate; gusty, changeable, some showers, and mist; cooler.

Remarks on the Weather compiled from 6 p.m. observation

Pressure ranges from 1027 millibars 30.35 inches at the Western Azores to 995 millibars 29.4 inches in the north-east of Scotland. The wind has shifted into northerly in the Hebrides, but is between southerly and westerly elsewhere. Fresh to strong in force in many parts of England. Temperature ranges from 54 at Eskalemuir and 57 at Aberdeen to 67 at Margate and 70 at Yarmouth. The weather is in a very changeale state, from fine to overcast and dull, and rain is falling at several places in the north. The sea is rather rough off Portland Bill; moderate to smooth elsewhere.

During the day the temperature has exceeded 70 between Margate and Skegness. Rain has fallen generally, about ½ inch in places 1 ½ inches at Buxton. Banff reports no bright sunshine, but over the southern districts the records are considerable, ranging up to 11 hours at Felixstowe and 12 hours at Falmouth. As far west as the 20th Meridian, ships on the southern routes have experienced light to moderate westerly and north-westerly breezes, and on the northern routes light easterly and north-easterly breezes. Fine weather predominating.

Sunshine-London, 4.9 hours; Banff, nil; Southend 8 hours; Torquay, 9.7 hours.

Mike

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Thanks- not quite the 'flaming June' day I had imagined!

We are talking about Manchester, after all!

Ron

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Thank you for the replies. It is to assist in the writing of my special 100th anniversary assembly. 'The Three Captains' which takes as its starting point the Bury Grammar School Sports Day on 23rd June 1914.

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Mark

The Bolton Evening News of Monday 22/06/1914 reported that on Saturday 20/05/1914 Sir Edward Carson had addressed a stirring speech to an enthusiastic unionist demonstration of 12 to 15,000 in the grounds of Lever Hall. The report started "With torrential rain falling".... The weather forecast on the same day (presumably for the 23rd) was "Wind between N and W, light or moderate. Local showers, mostly fair. Temperature about normal". The forecast in the BEN of 23/05/1915 was "Wind W and NW, light, moderate, fresh at times. Changeable. Fair intervals. Day temperatures below normal". This edition also reported a plague of bees in Friedrichstrasse, Berlin. Nothing in the BEN 24/05/1914 about the previous day.

Brian

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  • 7 years later...

Hello all, my name is Brian, I am trying to find the weather in London for 28 June 1914 - can anyone suggest anything?

I'm not a paid subscriber, alas, for the British Library newspaper archives; in Australia, we have a free newspaper archive (trove.gov.au) but can't find similar for 'mother country' press.  Not after great detail, just hoping for a contemporary source to confirm (perhaps even elaborate slightly) on what I have so far (which is: 'Sunday 28 June 1914 was warm and sunny, and most Londoners were enjoying a day of rest') from the excellent FO History blog: From <https://history.blog.gov.uk/2014/06/16/the-lamps-are-going-out-tweeting-the-july-crisis/

 

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13 minutes ago, BA Johnstone said:

I am trying to find the weather in London for 28 June 1914

It should be somewhere in here, but I can't open the June pdf at the moment.

https://digital.nmla.metoffice.gov.uk/so_8e849ca6-9425-4774-871a-75bee655972c/

Might be worth contacting the Met Office and asking - they were very helpful to me once when I had a similar query for the English Channel in October 1845.

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It may be worth looking at a unit war diary. Many of them contain comments on the weather every day, especially RE companies.

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  • Admin

I've removed your email addresses from your post Brian, never a good idea to put information like that in your posts on a public forum, spammers visit and gather information. Should members. Wish to contact you off forum, or vice versa, you can use private messages. 

Michelle 

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7 minutes ago, Michelle Young said:

Should members. Wish to contact you off forum, or vice Verda, you can use private messages. 

But not until he has posted twice?

BillyH.

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  • Admin

One post Billy. 

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Hi Brian

Welcome to the Forum, as seaJane says there is something wrong with the pdf opening, however, I have managed a screen grap and here is a photo of the relevant page for 28/6/14. London Kew Gardens has a temp of 75° F . Hope it is of use albeit faint, I will try to enhance it later.

John

 

E980F240-BC0A-41FF-97E1-C3E7D4AFA934.jpeg

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5 minutes ago, Michelle Young said:

One post Billy. 

I stand corrected :)

BillyH.

Edited by BillyH
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4 hours ago, BA Johnstone said:

Hello all, my name is Brian, I am trying to find the weather in London for 28 June 1914 - can anyone suggest anything?

Hi @BA Johnstone and welcome to the forum.

The 28th June 1914 was a Sunday so as far as a weather forecast is concerned the newspaper search you'd need is the newspapers for the 27th - and of course there are no War Diaries to check at that point in time :)

Here's what The Times had to say on the 27th:-

638051035_TheTimesSaturdayJune271914p5AfineweekendsourcedTheTimesDigitalArchive.png.8c6cc8c3b4693bbef6ec2c8cc838293c.png

The practice sessions and early races for the Henley Regatta started on the 27th. I can't work out from The Times reporting whether any racing took place on Sunday. However a report on the Monday sessions that appeared in the edition dated Tuesday 30th June 1914 starts:-

1448955761_TheTimesTuesdayJune301914p14TheCrewsatHenleysourcedTheTimesDigitalArchive-1.png.0280c336d83f55601a3c2e49fe773387.png

Both images courtesy The Times Digital Archive.

A report on the same page about Tennis matches at The Queens Club also mentions how hot it was on Monday, while reports in the edition of the The Times dated Monday 29th June 1914 make frequent mention of how hot \ pleasantly warm it was in matches played on the Saturday - particularly in reference to tennis at Wimbledon and Cricket at Lords.

Will be intrigued as to how this relates to the Great War!

Hope that helps,
Peter

Edited by PRC
Typo
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And I have posted the exact readings from the Met Office including Kew, (see above),so it was a pleasant weekend for all inland but cooler on the coast on the day😁

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26 minutes ago, Knotty said:

And I have posted the exact readings from the Met Office including Kew, (see above),so it was a pleasant weekend for all inland but cooler on the coast on the day😁

" ...with cloud bubbling up, causing some wet stuff to fall later..."

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