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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

107th Machine gun Company Position


jeanburton

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Can anyone tell me where the above Company was at the end of July and beginning of August 1917? My grandfather's silver war badge was dated 1st Aug 1917. Does this date mean he was wounded on that day?

Thanks Jean

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The date given is usually the date he was discharged from the army, not when the injury occurred.

Craig

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Jean

I have a copy of the war diary; if you can provide a name I can tell you if he's mentioned. Some other rank casualties are mention in the summer of 1917 but generally the diary doesn't mention them.

If this is regarding John Bannister I have not found his name around this time.

Kind regards

Colin

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Thanks Craig and Colin.

Yes it is John Edward Bannister that I am still searching. If he was not mentioned can you tell me briefly what the Company were doing. My father, now diseased, told me that he was shot by a sniper.

The date is at the top of the silver war badge columns on the right side and just after "para 392 etc" He wasn't discharged until 9th May 1919.

Do you know where he was likely to be taken to be treated? Where would be the nearest casualty station?

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Jean

I believe that the date is that of the army instruction (AO) that provided the criteria of their discharge rather than a date of wounding. If you look at most of the previous and subsequent pages on the SWB this reference and date are included.

The main events for 107th MG Company, during the summer of 1917, were involvement in the attack on Messines Ridge on 7 June and the attack on 16 August as part of the battle of Langemarck. Though he could have been wounded before or after this or with 36th MG Battalion during 1918. It would depend on the severity of his wound and how quickly he might recover.

He would have been treated at one of the Field Ambulances belonging to 36th Division (http://www.1914-1918.net/36div.htm) and would then have gone back via various nodes in the medical evacuation chain. The Long Long Trail website covers this fairly well; better than I can summarize.

http://www.1914-1918.net/wounded.htm

Kind regards

Colin

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Thanks Colin

As far as I know he was badly wounded and did not return to service .He was shot in the chest. So he was most likely wounded in the summer.

I would have thought he would have received a pension but I have looked for a record but none exists. My father said he applied but didn't get one, which seems strange.

Jean

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