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Remembered Today:

RFC what cap badge Officers and other Rank


George1884
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Hi,

This is one of the photos of my grandad, he served in the RFC-RAF 1917-1920, posted to france, he is the small chap in the dark uniform, his rank was Pte2, and his record show him as a Batman, my question is ,1# Can you identify the Cap badge,

#2 the other chaps appear to have "pips" on their collars and lanyards, are these men pilot officers,

#3 would he have been a Batman to all of these men?

served in "Vendome", 208 Sqdn, 20 Sqdn, Cranwell after 1919

Thank you would like any info on any details given.post-110757-0-43764000-1401091588_thumb.

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Hi George 1884,

Welcome to the Forum,

The badge which they all appear to be wearing is the Royal Artillery Badge. Perhaps RFC/RAF has become transposed from RFA?

Robert

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The cap badge is Royal Artillery. The pips are shoulder titles center front you can just make out RA, They all appear to be gunners [possibly batmans collective photo boots on shoetrees givaway] picture appears to be around 1919 or later collar dogs in use.

John

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Thank you both,

I am now confused, if the badge is RA, why would a RAF "Batman" be their Batman? or is RA gunner a airforce gunner?

Phil

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The cap badge is Royal Artillery. The pips are shoulder titles center front you can just make out RA, They all appear to be gunners [possibly batmans collective photo boots on shoetrees givaway] picture appears to be around 1919 or later collar dogs in use.

John

Thank you,

I am now confused, if the badge is RA, why would a RAF "Batman" be their Batman? or is RA gunner a airforce gunner?

phill

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Post Great War photograph - collar badges and lanyards worn on the right shoulder indicate 1920 or after. Did this man join the Regular or Territorial Army after WW1?

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Post Great War photograph - collar badges and lanyards worn on the right shoulder indicate 1920 or after. Did this man join the Regular or Territorial Army after WW1?

Thank you,

He was discharged July 1920 (deformed Feet excused Boots) His wife died in Sept that year so may have been connected. he had 4 children, and Dad never said that grandad was in any other unit other than the RAF.

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Post Great War photograph - collar badges and lanyards worn on the right shoulder indicate 1920 or after. Did this man join the Regular or Territorial Army after WW1?

Spot on squirrel. Definitely RA and as you say the lanyard moved to right shoulder in the 1920s, at the same time as collar badges were authorised on SD uniforms. There is clearly some confusion regarding any RAF connection as none can be seen in the photo whatsoever.

As mentioned earlier it seems possible that the acronyms RFA and RFC have been mixed up. RFA could also be misinterpreted as RAF.

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Spot on squirrel. Definitely RA and as you say the lanyard moved to right shoulder in the 1920s, at the same time as collar badges were authorised on SD uniforms. There is clearly some confusion regarding any RAF connection as none can be seen in the photo whatsoever.

As mentioned earlier it seems possible that the acronyms RFA and RFC have been mixed up. RFA could also be misinterpreted as RAF.

Only the soldier in front row extreme left is wearing medal ribbons.

Thanks you , But I have grandads (FS form 280), certificate of service, and form 3296 Central pay office RAF, plus other documents, he was in the RAF, the first picture must be after the war when he was posted to Cranwell officer training 20sqdn. I have uploaded to more photo's ,

# do you know what the button is just below pocket?

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Spot on squirrel. Definitely RA and as you say the lanyard moved to right shoulder in the 1920s, at the same time as collar badges were authorised on SD uniforms. There is clearly some confusion regarding any RAF connection as none can be seen in the photo whatsoever.

As mentioned earlier it seems possible that the acronyms RFA and RFC have been mixed up. RFA could also be misinterpreted as RAF.

Thanks,

Hope this photo show RFC badge,

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Thanks,

Hope this photo show RFC badge,

No other photos seen yet?

The first photo that you posted contains men only in the RA. All badges and insignia on the men are RA.

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No other photos seen yet?

The first photo that you posted contains men only in the RA. All badges and insignia on the men are RA.

post-110757-0-84168500-1401117567_thumb.

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No other photos seen yet?

The first photo that you posted contains men only in the RA. All badges and insignia on the men are RA.

Sorry, having problems reducing size of photos, however, please see RAF Camp, and one in uniform with a round button under the right pocket, not sure what that is.

Thanks for your help, Phill

post-110757-0-32686400-1401117710_thumb.

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Sorry, having problems reducing size of photos, however, please see RAF Camp, and one in uniform with a round button under the right pocket, not sure what that is.

Thanks for your help, Phill

Yes both photos show men in early RAF uniform. A good quick indicator is the absence of shoulder straps on the serge jackets, which became a feature of RAF uniform after it was formed in April 1918.

Another man has the one piece overall (no collar), which had no exposed buttons in order to avoid catching on the aircraft rigging wires.

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Yes both photos show men in early RAF uniform. A good quick indicator is the absence of shoulder straps on the serge jackets, which became a feature of RAF uniform after it was formed in April 1918.

Another man has the one piece overall (no collar), which had no exposed buttons in order to avoid catching on the aircraft rigging wires.

Thanks, that is great.

do you know what the roundel type badge is shown on the uniform (single), I also noted that on the photo of grandad with the banjo, what appears to be two dog tags type discs, any idea?

I am starting to build a picture of his service just based on uniform, its; fantastic.

Phill

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Thanks, that is great.

do you know what the roundel type badge is shown on the uniform (single), I also noted that on the photo of grandad with the banjo, what appears to be two dog tags type discs, any idea?

I am starting to build a picture of his service just based on uniform, its; fantastic.

Phill

The 'roundel' is in fact a watch fob for the pocket watch in his top left hand pocket.

His ID discs (aka 'dog tags') have been attached to his braces in the other photo, they were made of compressed fibre board.

post-599-0-21499000-1401124941_thumb.jpg

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The 'roundel' is in fact a watch fob for the pocket watch in his top left hand pocket.

His ID discs (aka 'dog tags') have been attached to his braces in the other photo, they were made of compressed fibre board.

Wow,

Thanks, what a day of discovery today has been.

As a point of interest, grandad remarried, and worked in Filton airplane works during WWii so continued his interest in aviation, he died 1956,

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Looks like a mandolin in the picture rather than a banjo. Regards, Paul. Your relative looks older in the 1st picture.

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