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Remembered Today:

RFA ammunition abbreviations


HowieJ
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I have recently obtained the 112 Bgde RFA war diary.



Each day it summarises the number of rounds fired, these are shown as "465/A 10/AX". Can anyone tell me what these mean?



Any help gratefully received


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A was the code for 18-pounder shrapnel shells and AX was the code for 18-pounder high explosive shells. Credit given to forum member Op-Ack (Chris) who explained these codes earlier this year.

Tom

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Tom,

Many thanks.

I had assumed that it was something like that, but hadn't come across Op-Acks message when searching: probably not searching on the right words.

Regards,

Howie

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Tom

I'm a bit confused by your post, yes, the abbreviations are correct, but you refer to Chris as being Op-Ack. that's me, and I'm Phil :w00t:

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Phil - apologies for getting your name wrong. I was looking at a post where you addressed your comments TO Chris. I have had another look and see that you signed off as Phil.

Sorry mate.

Tom

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Gents,

I was unable to find the said message, could you possible give me a thread to look for? Or a URL.

Regards,

Howie

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Phil - apologies for getting your name wrong. I was looking at a post where you addressed your comments TO Chris. I have had another look and see that you signed off as Phil.

Sorry mate.

Tom

Tom

No need to apologies, I was just confused, after all I am getting on in years :hypocrite:

Phil

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Howie

I can’t find the URL myself, so I can’t post a link, but my research indicates the following codes were used in ammunition returns during WW1.

A 18-pounder Shrapnel shell. .

AX 18-pounder High Explosive shell.

BSK WW1 artillery abbreviation for 4.5-inch Howitzer lachrymatory gas shells. The abbreviation derived from B for 4.5-inch Howitzer ammunition and SK for South Kensington where the Imperial College Chemistry laboratories were located.

BX 4.5" Howitzer High Explosive shell.

Sorry those are the only ones I know at the moment.

Phil

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Phil,

Many thanks.

As far as I can see they only fired A and AX.

Howie

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I as wondering what that meant!!,

I'm currently working my way through the A bty 15th bge way diary :thumbsup:

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Extracts from the 2nd Canadian Divn Ammunition Column war diary mention some codes, which with Op-Ack's post gives the following: A - 18pdr shrapnel, AX - 18pdr high explosive, AS - 18pdr smoke, B - 4.5in shrapnel, BX - 4.5in high explosive, BS - 4.5in smoke. At one point in the diary the Canadians create dumps allotting 600 rounds per 18pdr, made up of 75% A, 25% AX, with an additional 100 rounds AS.

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