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Moonraker

Air-raid evacuees from London

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Moonraker

I always thought that children being evacuated from London because of the dangers/fears of air-raids was a WWII phenomenon. But I gather that it also occurred in the Great War.

But to what extent? I can imagine that some adults decided that it might be safer to get out of the Capital and acted independently, perhaps staying with friends and relatives. And perhaps a few sent their children away. But I wonder if there was any official action?

Moonraker

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seaJane

If there was, it didn't include my grandmother, who used to tell me about her primary school air-raid drill...

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johnboy

Nor my grandmother who got a badge for good attendance at school.

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Magnumbellum

If there was, it didn't include my grandmother, who used to tell me about her primary school air-raid drill...

I wonder whether that itself is confusion with WW2. In WW1 there was no system of air raid warnings and air raid shelters which schoolchildren could practise hearing and using, whereas both were standard in WW2, including the barley sugar emergency rations which children could "practise" consuming, while "practising" an extended stay in the shelter.

I certainly have never heard of any organised evacuation from London or any other city, and the principles of planning it would be odd, because their were no concentrated systematic air raids, comparable with the WW2 Blitz..

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Moonraker

At today's briefing at Tidworth about centenary events in Wiltshire, there was a brief reference to a university student having got a grant to research such evacuees who were sent to the county.

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seaJane

I wonder whether that itself is confusion with WW2. .

I don't think so. She was born in 1909 and remembered well: the drill was to take one's slate out of its slot, put it inside the desk, sit under the desk with one's hands on one's head, and sing Land of Hope and Glory.

By WW2 she was a VAD (Lewisham mobile ambulance no.4).

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Moonraker

Googling "London evacuees 1917" produced very few relevant hits, except

this one

which actually is the project mentioned yesterday.

Moonraker

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