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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

sued

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This might seem obvious to some members but could anyone explain to me exactly what a strong point was, and how Royal Engineers would have built them.

Sue

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I think the term is rather broad and could mean many different things including a keep or redoubt " A position in a trench system so fortified as to enable a small body of men to resist attack from any direction". How fortified would depend on its position, materials available, time available, whether the construction needs to be hidden from the enemy etc etc etc. Often built of sand bags but could include concrete, elephant iron, wood, bricks - the word improvisation comes to mind. Plans attached.

post-9885-0-08463900-1398077790_thumb.jp post-9885-0-76899000-1398077833_thumb.jp

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That's just what I wanted - thankyou. Were the plans from a book, and if so what is its title?

Thanks again,

Sue

Erm - Trench Warfare - as per top of diagrams

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I wondered if that was a chapter heading. Have you got the author, or was it an official document, such as the Manual of Field Works, which I believe was published by the war Office in 1921?

Sue

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It's to be found in one of the archives of down loadable books don't know who wrote it but does date from about 1917/18. Should be possible to find it with a search

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Hi Robert,

Thankyou for the link - I've just had a brief look and it looks very interesting. I also had a look at the rest of the book, and found a map of the Zonnebeke area that is very useful. I've recently bought the Manual of Field Works, and at first glance it doesn't appear to mention strong points, so the History of the New Zealand Engineers may fill the gap. Thankyou again - this forum is wonderful!

Sue

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Pleasure, Sue. I found the book to be a gold mine of practical information about what was actually done.

Robert

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