Jump to content
Free downloads from TNA ×
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Skipman

Recommended Posts

I can't find this woman on CWGC, would this be of interest to the " In From the Cold Project "

British Newspaper Archves-Evening Telegraph - Thursday 25 December 1919

Nurses Tragic Death

Health Undermined by Gas Poisoning

It was stated at the inquest at West Hartlepool on May Ernestine Nissen, of 127 Stockton Road, that she was a trained hospital nurse, and had been acting in that capacity at No. 14 Filling Factory, Hereford. On November 4, 1918, she was gassed at the works, and on October 9, this year she returned home very ill, death occurring on December 21. Dr Strove: expressed the opinion that the cause of death was cancer of the stomach. He considered that the deceased's health had been undermined by gas poisoning. He understood that the type of gas responsible for the trouble was mustard gas. A verdict that " Death was due to cancer of the stomach accelerated by gas poisoning contracted whilst following her employment " was recorded.

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

mike

her death notice appeared in the normal deaths column and not under any reference to a war death. all references below are for west hartlepool.

northern daily mail

west hartlepool

22 december 1919

nissen

on 21 december, at 127 stockton road, may ernestine, second daughter of mrs nissen and the late mr arthur nissen. funeral arrangements later.

23 december 1919

nissen

on 21 december, at 127 stockton road, may ernestine, second daughter of mrs nissen and the late mr arthur nissen. cortege leaves residence on wednesday, at 2-30pm, for service in st aidan's church.

A MUNITION WORKER'S DEATH

the coroner has been informed of the death of miss may ernestine nissen, who resided at 127 stockton road, west hartlepool. it is stated that in november, 1918, miss nissen, who was employed in a munition factory at hereford, was gassed and developed pnuemonia. she recovered and was able to return to work, but through renewed illness, was obliged to return home on october 9th last. she was medically attended, but death took place last night.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for that. " she was a trained hospital nurse, and had been acting in that capacity at No. 14 Filling Factory, Hereford. On November 4, 1918, she was gassed at the works "

I was probably reading more into it, than should have. If you're satisfied, then I'm happy with that.

Cheers Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No worries, Mike.

Always far better to raise the question of non-commemoration than not raise it and we miss someone we could have caught.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Admin

Mike

Just keep posting. As John says - better safe than sorry.

From "The Unending Vigil" by Philip Longworth about the history of the CWGC: When the Blitz started in 1940, the fear carried over from the 1930's that massed bomber fleets could possibly kill more civilians than soldiers (being not long after Dunkirk) made Churchill and Sir Fabian Ware approach the King to get the Charter altered to include civilians.

Glen

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Civilian deaths from the Great War are not commemorated by CWGC. Rules changed by WW2.

John

Was there a difference between Munition Workers.

post-12115-0-64584300-1397833766_thumb.j

Ray

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It may be that there is a difference betwen "foreign" workers and British workers. It's not something I have much knowledge of - but there was a munitions explosion near to me (Ashton under Lyne) in 1917. As far as I can tell, none of the 23 workers are commemorated.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are a great many problems with the criteria that were used for commemoration. They appear specially designed to minimise the perception of the deaths of women in the UK, munitions workers being especially poorly represented with so many losing their lives due to their war service. If Australian men working in British munitions factories hadn't been commemorated there would have been a diplomatic scandal - that's the only difference.

Sue

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A note from Terry Denham, in 2008:

Australian Munitions and War Workers Overseas are granted war grave status if they died on duty and of a war cause. That means that any dying of illness or non-war related accident do not qualify. ....

64 of them have been granted war grave status and are commemorated by CWGC.

I am just going to see if this figure has increased since 2008.

CGM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A basic search of the current CWGC database brings up a total of 57 Australian Munition Workers. No other nationalities.

Phil

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And there are 8 Australian War Workers (Labourers or Navies).

Total of 65.

The Australian Munition and War Workers were recruited, given a (Service) Number and subjected to some very detailed rules of employment.

CGM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

CGM,

Thanks for pointing out the ones I couldn't locate. An interesting record as well.

I had a look through the CWGC listings and noticed three are buried in Charlton Cemetery. On checking the very few photos I have of Charlton, I came across this one. It must have caught my eye at the time. They died within days of each other and are buried in a single grave. Unfortunately none of their records are online.

post-20576-0-91849900-1397848913_thumb.j

Phil

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...