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TV tonight 9/4 - sinking of HMS Audacious


elewis

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A documentary on the Yesterday TV channel at 10:00 tonight that might be of interest to readers.

"Deep Wreck Mysteries" -

Death of a Battleship Divers explore the wreck of First World War battleship HMS Audacious, which was once the pride of the Royal Navy and thought to be `unsinkable' until a single unexpected blow sealed its fate 14 miles off the coast of Northern Ireland

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In memory of P.O William Burgess of HMS Liverpool , the only casualty of this sinking. Tragically killed by shrapnel from Audacious whilst 800 yds distant.

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Thanks Evan, I will try to watch this - could be interesting.

Anne

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Thanks Evan.

I'll will be tuning in tonight.

Maxi

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Hadn't spotted this Evan. Thank you for alerting us

David

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Glad to help folks. If anybody misses it tonight keep your eyes open Yesterday frequently repeats programs a few days after.

Ian, that was very unfortunate for P.O William Burgess being killed when another ship 800 yds away explodes I wonder if he will get a mention

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Enjoyed the programme. Particularly taken by the photographs snapped from the Olympic.

David

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Quite an intersting programme, but it took me a while to work out why the navy officers caps were so way off the mark. As part of the filming was done in the U S they were wearing slightly modified Union Navy officers caps. Roll on the HMS Kearsarge

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Anyone want to tackle the cause of the second explosion? Jurens states it as a dislodged shell falling, piercing the deck and entering the magazine (the ship was by then inverted).

MaCarthy thinks the cordite was aflame.

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Its being repeated tonight Thurs 10th Apr 8pm same channel

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Anyone want to tackle the cause of the second explosion? Jurens states it as a dislodged shell falling, piercing the deck and entering the magazine (the ship was by then inverted).

MaCarthy thinks the cordite was aflame.

I'm inclined to favour McCartney. Jurens was looking at the vertical shell stowage aboard USS Texas, whereas British shell bins stored their contents horizontally, making it less likely that one could drop through the shellroom ceiling into the magazine - and even if it did, why would it be armed, and even if it was, would such an impact be sufficient?

It seems more likely to me that cordite was set alight by an arcing cable after one of the forward 13.5" mountings fell out.

Regards,

MikB

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I'm inclined to favour McCartney. Jurens was looking at the vertical shell stowage aboard USS Texas, whereas British shell bins stored their contents horizontally, making it less likely that one could drop through the shellroom ceiling into the magazine - and even if it did, why would it be armed, and even if it was, would such an impact be sufficient?

It seems more likely to me that cordite was set alight by an arcing cable after one of the forward 13.5" mountings fell out.

Regards,

MikB

I'm inclined to favour McCartney. Jurens was looking at the vertical shell stowage aboard USS Texas, whereas British shell bins stored their contents horizontally, making it less likely that one could drop through the shellroom ceiling into the magazine - and even if it did, why would it be armed, and even if it was, would such an impact be sufficient?

It seems more likely to me that cordite was set alight by an arcing cable after one of the forward 13.5" mountings fell out.

Regards,

MikB

Yes I thought that a shell detonation would have been unlikely . If they came loose during the the capsize I think they would have just rolled about the shell room deck and when the ship turned Turtle would have fell away from the cordite magazine, which was, I believe at the lowest level. I also thought that the shells would not detonate with out either being primed which was done away from the shell room higher up the turret in either the preparation chamber or the gunhouse itsself, or subjected to intense heat. Flm footage of "Jutland "wrecks showed intact shells which seem o be from the shell room associated with the magazine that exploded. . .

I see they used the "Barham" footage in this but at least acknowledge that it was HMS Barham and WW2.

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Yes I thought that a shell detonation would have been unlikely . If they came loose during the the capsize I think they would have just rolled about the shell room deck and when the ship turned Turtle would have fell away from the cordite magazine, which was, I believe at the lowest level. I also thought that the shells would not detonate with out either being primed which was done away from the shell room higher up the turret in either the preparation chamber or the gunhouse itsself, or subjected to intense heat. Flm footage of "Jutland "wrecks showed intact shells which seem o be from the shell room associated with the magazine that exploded. . .

I see they used the "Barham" footage in this but at least acknowledge that it was HMS Barham and WW2.

It was the shellroom which was at the lowest level of the mounting structure in British battleships of this period, with the propellant magazine typically above, so in an upturned battleship the shellrooms would be uppermost. Only in the later Nelsons and KGVs was this reversed. So Jurens' theory is at least orientationally possible - though to my mind every other aspect of it seems very improbable. Whereas cordite fires and explosions have a varied and infamous history- not only losses in battle but, for example, the explosion aboard Vanguard in 1917.

Regards,

MikB

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It was the shellroom which was at the lowest level of the mounting structure in British battleships of this period, with the propellant magazine typically above, so in an upturned battleship the shellrooms would be uppermost. Only in the later Nelsons and KGVs was this reversed. So Jurens' theory is at least orientationally possible - though to my mind every other aspect of it seems very improbable. Whereas cordite fires and explosions have a varied and infamous history- not only losses in battle but, for example, the explosion aboard Vanguard in 1917.

Regards,

MikB

I should have realised that that WW1 era ships had their Shell room at the lower level because remember thinking if HMS Hood had had her Magazine and Shell room as the later ships she may have survived because because a shell penetrating and exploding in the shell room may not have set off the shells or spread to the magazine.

It was a magazine explosion on the USS Maine, probably caused by heat from adjacent boiler room that started the Spanish-Aamerican war.

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