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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

"A" Battery 256 Brigade.


Johno7439

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Evening All! Has anybody got access (or does one exist?????) of the war diary for "A" Battery 256th Brigade RFA. I am interested in finding out casualty numbers for this particular battery.

Yours aye

Ewan

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Ewan

Sometimes there are Battery Diaries but all get collated within the Brigade Diary. I have seen several where the Batteries have had separate tasks and they kept their own for that period.

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  • 8 months later...

WW1 Grandad on Gun Carrage funeral 1.jpg

In 1918 my Grandfather was also a gunner with "A" Battery 256 Brigade.He joined up in 1915 at the age of 16 and was later sent home for being under age. He was called up in 1918 when he reached his 18th year.

The attached photograph is of my Grandfather Gunner John Acott who survived the war. He is seated on a gun carriage at a funeral ("X" above his head). Can anyone identify the gun please. Is there any other information that can be gleaned from the photographs. How would I go about dating it or finding out who the funeral was for. The picture looks like it may be for a newspaper. Was it taken in England? Would it be a local paper near where he lived or would it be near where the regiment was based? Why does he have such a prominent role on the gun carriage. Would the dead man be a an officer or fellow gun crew member or friend?

Thanks

Simon

post-119172-0-00632200-1420225025_thumb.

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Hello Simon

It was quite normal for two of the members of a gun detachment to ride on the gun limber, as your grandfather is doing. The gun appears to be an 18-pounder, the commonest weapon of the field artillery and the one with which A Battery 256 Brigade would have been equipped.

There seem to be a number of civilian men in the background watching, which I think makes it more likely that the photo was taken in the UK. It is fairly likely that the dead man was in the same battery as your grandfather, but by no means certain, as the use of a gun carriage was common for all military funerals.

None of the men are wearing medal ribbons which indicates that the photo was taken during the war or very shortly afterwards.

Ron

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Thanks Ron

If the photo was taken in the UK would that mean that the solder died in the UK or would his body have been brought over from France. Why might this have happened.

Here is another photo of the same funeral.

Simon

post-119172-0-50092500-1420280983_thumb.

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Simon

If he died abroad he would almost certainly have been buried abroad, unless he was a very senior officer e.g. Lord Roberts, or the Unknown Warrior.

Ron

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