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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Can someone identify this "spent round" ?


SteveMarsdin

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Good evening All,

Can someone help me please. My Belgian in-laws have found a spent round in their garden today and have asked me to date it ? I'll attach 2 photos, on one of which I've noted the lettering and numbering, as advised by my in-laws:

post-48281-0-29409700-1396284793_thumb.p

post-48281-0-70153300-1396284945_thumb.j

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It's not 'spent' as the primer has no mark from a firing pin, so was never fired. I believe it dates from 1913 and is German; one of the forum munitions experts will provide more info.

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It's not 'spent' as the primer has no mark from a firing pin, so was never fired. I believe it dates from 1913 and is German; one of the forum munitions experts will provide more info.

Not even a round just an unfired cartridge case. I assume it's from your Belgian garden? If so possibly some soldier wanted to get at the propellant.

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Steve,a bit more info;

DM Deutsche Waffen-u. Munitionsfabriken, Karlsruhe/Berlin : 1915 to 1918

Regards,

Sean.

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Thanks, as you will have noted from my original erroneous description of "spent round", I have a very limited knowledge of ammunition !

The area was fought over on 23 August 1914 then under German occupation until 1918, that was repeated on 10 May 1940 with German occupation until 1944.

post-48281-0-72107400-1396289628_thumb.j

I suspect my mother-in-law is trying to get me to dig their garden over for them, when I'm over at Easter :thumbsup:

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I bet you will have a little look! Some way to go before you match TT's efforts though.

Roger

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It's obviously a 7,92x57mm. Mauser case - but nobody's said so yet!

Regards,

MikB

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Thanks MikB,

Roger, I can always plant the potatoes at the same time !

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In an area where WW1 finds are few and far between, these were unearthed a few miles away.

post-48281-0-67270400-1396296061_thumb.j

They put my mother-in-law's find in perspective !

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It's obviously a 7,92x57mm. Mauser case - but nobody's said so yet!

And 'S' stands for 'Spitzer', the standard German pointed bullet.

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Thanks, Mick.

The artillery shells are French 75s and as the French Army only passed through Jehonville twice on 22/08/14 it is easier for the locals to date that one !

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Thanks, as you will have noted from my original erroneous description of "spent round", I have a very limited knowledge of ammunition !

The area was fought over on 23 August 1914 then under German occupation until 1918, that was repeated on 10 May 1940 with German occupation until 1944.

attachicon.gifguerre03 (600 x 402).jpg

I suspect my mother-in-law is trying to get me to dig their garden over for them, when I'm over at Easter :thumbsup:

When I announced at an early age (7 or so, according to my biggest sis-in-law) that I intended to be an archaeologist mum and dad had me digging the garden for a sword that was allegedly buried there... Of course I found nowt - but there again they were not that happy to see a 1'6 hole in the garden either! :thumbsup:

It is a well-known trick, Steve, so yes, may as well take some spud seeds with you!

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And 'S' stands for 'Spitzer', the standard German pointed bullet.

Don't wanna try an' out-pedant Tony, but I think 'Spitzer' is itself an abbreviation - probably not German - of 'Spitzgeschoss' (lit. pointed shot) :D.

Regards,

MikB

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And 'S' stands for 'Spitzer', the standard German pointed bullet.

True, but strictly speaking the "S" in the headstamp defines the case, not the bullet. The "S" case was modified with a slightly larger neck diameter than the previous M88 case. This was to accommodate the new "S" bullet which had a diameter of 8.22mm rather than the previous M88 diameter of 8.1mm.

Similarly the new powder was known as "S" powder.

An "S" case did not necessarily have an "S" bulllet, as evidenced by paper bulleted blanks.

Anyway, casting aside pedantry, your case was made by Deutsche Munitionsfabriken in April 1913.

Regards

TonyE

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Thanks very much, Tony.

The date is important as it means it could have been left in August 14

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