Jump to content
Free downloads from TNA ×
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Post Office War Memorials


John(txic)

Recommended Posts

Just stumbled across this site today: http://www.royalmailmemorials.com/

A worthy endeavour - worth a look.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This link is most interesting John. I scrolled through it hoping to find a family member who was in the Royal Engineers (Postal Section) KIA Gallipoli. I did not find him but was impressed at the numbers of Post Office Memorials and how ornate some of them are. A great tribute!

Many thanks.

Anne

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well gathered together but a disappointment that the actual names are not listed separately for the larger memorials are photographed from a distance making the reading of the names impossible.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great John, many thanks for "posting".....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a look and did not see any reference to a fine memorial [listed by IWM/NIWM as no. 2358] which was in the old Head Post Office for Liverpool, in Victoria Street, which closed in the 1970s. The building has been modified and now styled the 'Metquarter', full of boutiques, and the memorial has been re-housed there for a few years.

I emailed the Postal Memorials site who asked if the Victoria Street Post Office had closed! I have sent them details, as above and hope it will now be recognised by them.

D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, daggers, I found a couple that weren't on there too. Good to see that they respond to enquiries, isn't it?

There may be a problem with "map" search - I couldn't find Matlock by that method, but found it by name search.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

John

The full response includes this:

'I know it is a shame but the database only includes memorials that are currently on Royal Mail and Post Office premises.'

This may explain why the ones you spotted are not listed.

D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

John, an excellent post very many thanks for it as I (and I suspect a lot of others using this forum) did not know of ithis site. As Anne said "impressed at the numbers of Post Office Memorials and how ornate some of them are" also a well designed site with the map and search options as well as the pictures and lisst of names.

Anne, you said you "scrolled through" and could not find your family member. Did you try the search facility with just the surname?. It found a couple of people I was looking for and a lot quicker than working through the memorials!.

Jim, did you use the "learn more" option under the photographs as it listed all the names on several large memorials that I looked at

Daggers, agree it is a shame that memorial on sites no longer used by the PO are not listed. Maybe if anybody is aware of any and have the details they could add them to this thread?.

Evan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just thought I would view my local Bournemouth sorting office and was puzzled that it stated

"This memorial is located in the enquiry office reception. Not accessible to the public."

When it is right there alongside one when you are collecting anything its the only area accessible to the public.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Looking at the Cheltenham memorial two things struck me -

1) The deaths are in date order. I can not remember ever having seen a memorial in this order before. How rare is it?.

2) The last two deaths are Hulbert, P. (Miss) - A.A.C and Hadley, M.E. (Miss) - A.A.C

Two quesions here - 1) I take A.A.C. to be the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps or has anybody a better suggestion?. 2) Why are they not recorded on the CWGC website?

I admit to having known nothing about the W.A.A.C. prior to looking into this but these were obviously not issolated cases as I found the following 2 examples -

"Although not on combat duties, members of the WAAC had to endure shelling from heavy artillery and bombing raids by German aircraft. During one attack in April, 1918, nine WAACs were killed at the Etaples Army Camp. British newspapers claimed that it was another example of a German atrocity but Helen Gwynne-Vaughan was quick to point out at a press conference that as the WAAC were in France as replacements for soldiers, the enemy was quite entitled to try and kill them."

"The WAAC also shared the dangers of their male colleagues. Air raids on the camps and depots were frequent and in one, on 30 May 1918, nine women died in an air raid at Abbeville, with six wounded."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting site, my only crit is that the images are a bit low-res. I've sent them an email about Southport, as the post office there recently moved into a branch of WH Smiths and I'm not sure where the memorial is now.

2) The last two deaths are Hulbert, P. (Miss) - A.A.C and Hadley, M.E. (Miss) - A.A.C

Two quesions here - 1) I take A.A.C. to be the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps or has anybody a better suggestion?. 2) Why are they not recorded on the CWGC website?

Perhaps the Cheltenham roll of honour commemortates those who served and not just casualties? Regarding the two women, I did a quick bit of research:

Hulbert, P: There is a service record for Persis Hulbert on the National Archives website, and she is also listed in the post office records on Ancestry. Persis Hulbert married Ralph Beddows in 1920, but she died in 1926 age 30.

Hadley, M E: I've found a Mabel Ellen Hadley at Cheltenham in the post office records, and a birth registered at Thornbury in 1897. Not sure but she may have died a spinster in 1998 age 101? No service record so far as I can see.

Not sure what the CWGC criteria would have been for WAACs, but there's one buried near me who was knocked down by a bus.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Many thanks Paul, but please do excuse me while I crawl away and hide in shame and embarrassment.

Looking again it says "In memory of those who fought in the First World War". Selecting 3 or 4 of the other rarer names they are also not listed on the CWGC site, additionally looking in more detail 26 names have the date of 4th or 5th August 1914 which perfectly ties in with when Britain declared war on Germany so the dates are when they signed on rather than deaths.

I can not imagine how many war memorials I have looked at, but it would be a large number, and this one having the date of enlistment is definately a first.

Although I have had access to Ancestry for several years I had not used the "Professional & Organisational Directories" before (possibly because the bulk of my ancestors were plain old "Ag Labs"). Using Persis Hulbert as an example they certainly have useful information and can be used to track people moving as in her case she is in Cheltenham in Sept 1914, but moved down to Stroud briefly in May 1915 before returning back to Cheltenham.

Edited by Evan_L
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...