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Captain C S Dixon royal Irish rifles


vintagescubaman

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I am trying to trace captain (later Major) C S Dixon of the royal Irish rifles, I can't find him on forces war records, any suggestions for other sources?

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You might find these few lines from the Battle of La Bassee of interest:

The Battalion still clung to Neuve Chapelle, but it was now in grievous case. In the last two days it had lost Captains Reynolds and Kennedy and Lieutenant Rea killed, and Lieutenants Lowry and Lavelle wounded. Major Daunt had already been wounded, and the command devolved upon Captain C. S. Dixon, who had not more than four or five officers left with his thinned companies. Two of these, "A" and "C," were moved back to Richebourg St. Vaast for a short rest on the morning of the 26th.

This was the blackest day of all. An enemy attack swept into the village from the north-east corner. "B" and "D" Companies were simply swallowed up, Lieutenants Finlay and Innes-Cross, the only officers with them, and every soul in their ranks, being reported missing. About 6.30 p.m. a counter-attack reoccupied half the village, and the rest of the Battalion, hastily summoned from Richebourg, took its place in the line. South-east of the village their splendid colleagues of the Wiltshire had clung to their trenches even when the enemy was behind them.

On the morning of the 27th the enemy turned the left flank of the Battalion. After terrible fighting from house to house, in which little groups were caught by the oncoming enemy like rocks flooded by a rising tide, Captain Dixon withdrew his handful to the western outskirts in an effort to save his brigade's flank. The battle had become at this point what the soldier aptly calls a "dog fight," a wild fury of rush and counter-rush.

Anne

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Extract from the war diary for this day; 26th Oct 14. Neuve Chapelle. Major Daunt having gone sick. Captain CS Dixon took over command of the Batt. B Coy in trenches, D Coy in support, A & C were ordered back to Billets at Richebourg St. Vaast. Enemy …. . in the vicinity of B & D Coys ( commanded by Lieut Finlay & Lieut Innes-Cross ). no further trace of these Coys or the officers commanding them could be attained. In the …. . A & C Coys were …. up into the firing line from Richebourg St. Vaast. That night the enemy was driven back and A & C Coys re-occupied the trenches. Major J Ryan DSO R Munster Fusiliers took over command of the Batt from Capt Dixon that evening. He was brother in law of Sergeant Powell, Wicklow and of Sergeant Turnbull of Bray.

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Charles Stewart Dixon was born 1876 in St. Leonards on Sea, Sussex. He was the son of Stewart Charles Dixon and Catherine R. Dixon. In the 1911 census he was living with his parents at Hollanden Cottage, Poole Road, Branksome, Bournemouth. He was then aged 34 years, single, and an Army Captain. I believe he died in the December quarter 1927, aged 50 years, in the London City District, volume 1c page 22 (This is the only recorded death of a Charles S. Dixon, born 1876/7 between 1916 and 2006). There was no probate record. No medal index card found on Ancestry, and no service record found on the NA search (This does mean there is no service record at Kew, just the usual search did not throw one up).

Following on from post#2 -

He was promoted Lt. in 4th Bn. R. Irish Rif. October 31 1894 (4th was a Militia Battalion)

http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/26565/pages/6065

Transferred from 4th Bn. to a Regular Bn. (1st or 2nd) R. Irish Rif. May 4 1898 and reverted to 2nd Lt.

http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/26963/pages/2751

Promoted Lieutenant February 24 1900

http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/27174/pages/1794

Promoted Captain July 18 1904

http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/27743/supplements/8560

Promoted Major May 27 1915

http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/29243/supplements/7417

Having been temp. Major from October 31 1914 to November 23 1914 inclusive

http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/29359/supplements/11033

Placed on the half pay list on account of ill-health June 4 1916

http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/29658/supplements/6824

Restored from the h.p. list to the supernumerary establishment January 29 1917 (The August 1918 Army Lists notes that he is employed at a Record Office)

http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/30038/supplements/4037

Placed on the h.p. list again (ill-health) September 4 1920

http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/32041/supplements/9036

But immediately restored to the full pay list and employed at a Record Office

http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/32053/supplements/9290

Placed back on the h.p. list on account of ill-health on ceasing to be employed at a Record Office April 1 1921

http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/32287/supplements/2877

And finally, retired on retired pay, as Major, July 16 1921.

http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/32392/supplements/5704

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Good grief, that's fantastic! I seem to struggle when searching the gazette, is there some trick I'm missing? Is there any way to focus searches in individual regiments etc?

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  • 4 months later...

Dixon Major Charles Stewart. Born at St Leonards, Hastings, Sussex, 1876, the son of Stewart Charles and Catherine R. Dixon. His father, born in Switzerland of British parentage, was a man of independent means. His mother was born at Windsor. Commissioned 2/Lt., 4th RIR Militia, 7.2.1894. Promoted Lt. 31.10.1894. Commissioned to 1st RIR as a 2/Lt., 4.5.1898. Promoted Lt., 2nd RIR, 24.2.1900, and Capt. 18.7.1904. The 1911 Census shows the family at Hollanden Cottage, Poole Road, Branksome, Bournemouth, Dorset. Children were Spencer S. (48), Mrs Catherine S. Vandeleur (39), and Charles (34). Joined 2nd RIR from 3rd RIR 10.10.1914. Commanded 2nd RIR as T/Major, 30.10.1914 to 24.11.1914, when he was placed on the sick list due to concussion. Promoted Major 27.5.1915. On half-pay list 4.6.1916 to 29.1.1917. Employed at the Record Office according to the 1918–19 Army Lists. Retired 16.7.1921. Address Hollanden Cottage. His father died 21.11.1920 leaving an estate of £6,979. May have died in London, 1927. File missing.

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  • 5 years later...

I know this is an old thread but I have a little more information regarding Major Charles Stewart Dixon. In 1927 he added the name Despencer to his surname (by deed poll). He died in 1940 in Bournemouth, Dorset. His will and probate are available online under the name of Charles Stewart Dixon-Despencer in which he leaves a legacy to his housekeeper and pretty much everything else to his daughter Felicity Eden Dixon -Despencer . Hope that is of some help....

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