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Ordnance Survey's six-inch to the mile (1:10,560) mapping of Engla


Kath

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In case this is of interest:

From Britarch via Peter McKeague.

"The National Library of Scotland - Map Library are very pleased to announce the availability of a new website resource - zoomable colour images of the Ordnance Survey's six-inch to the mile (1:10,560) mapping of England and Wales. All our map digitisation work in recent years has been externally funded, hence the recent expansion of our map images beyond Scotland.

This is the most detailed OS topographic mapping covering all of England and Wales from the 1840s to the 1950s. It was revised for the whole country twice between 1842-1893 and between 1891-1914, and then updated regularly for urban or rapidly changing areas from 1914 to the 1940s. Our holdings are made up of 37,390 sheets, including 35,124 quarter sheets, and 2,237 full sheets."

http://maps.nls.uk/openlayers.cfm?id=39

Kath.

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Thank you Cath for that information! I use current OS maps with my archaeology surveying courses at my uni in Turkey when teaching them map reading, and the kids always ask - 'Why can't we use something of the same scale for where we are?'.

To which the answer is that here in Turkey the military still control maps, and they are still secret in the same sense that the original OS maps were. So, firstly, they don't believe in large scale maps, and secondly, in any case they don't let any maps out until they they have done a new survey which now becomes 'Classified'. The result of the latter? Well, I have driven along roads in Turkey from A to B only to find a very large dam reservoir in the way that is not there on the map... Thank the gods for Google Earth and Quickbird...

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Good find, Kath, thanks.

Old-maps

offer a larger range of maps, I think, but the NLS maps look easier to find one's way around, and one can enlarge them for a good look without straining one's eyes. The early 1920s survey is handy for looking at Great War infrastructure that wasn't removed immediately after the war. I have memories from the 1990s of handling the heavy, bound volumes of 1920s 6-inch maps at what was then the National Archives.

Moonraker

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Those old six inches were such a joy for those of us in field archaeology in the uK... I think there was something similar for Turkey, German made, in connection with the wonderful Berlin-Baghdad railway. Must check - meaning, 'Thanks to you all as otherwise I never would have thought of that option"!

Trajan

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Kath, superb find, thank you.

Pete.

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NLS also have a layer for Google maps which covers the really large scale mapping of London (using 1890s maps). I think I've ready that the intention is to turn these 6" to the mile maps into a similar thing, so you will be able to simply move around the UK with the old map overlayed on the current map.

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Re post 4. I am reminded that in France in the 1960's it was difficult to purchase large scale maps which were called 'Cartes des Etat Majeur'

Old Tom

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Britain doesn't know how lucky it is with maps.

Some countries have the most bizarre attitudes. I was once trying to get a colection of maps of Belgium for a very long walk. I went to a bookshop in Arlon just down the road, to ask if they could get the collection i wanted. "Oh, no", they said, "these maps are classified army maps. You will have to go to the tourist office to get them"!

I ended up having to drive from tourist office to tourist offcie getting the maps from around each area as no one is allowed to keep a collection of the whole lot. Well, it is Belgium.

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Excellent link. I have a lot of use for it.

Ordnance Survey just took the British way in regards to secrecy. Just don't add it to the map, must confuse any invading army with that tactic!

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My 1998 revision of the 1:25,000 OS map of the Reading area shows pleasant woodland and suggests empty fields where the Atomic Weapons Establishment is sited at Aldermaston. The on-line Streetmap shows the outlines of buildings and labels AWE as a "depot". Bing Maps (actually aerial? satellite? photography) shows it in great detail.

Moonraker

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I remember when I went to visit the Radar Museum at Neatishead it wasn't shown on my os map but in the museum was a Soviet map clearly showing the site.

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My 1998 revision of the 1:25,000 OS map of the Reading area shows pleasant woodland and suggests empty fields where the Atomic Weapons Establishment is sited at Aldermaston. The on-line Streetmap shows the outlines of buildings and labels AWE as a "depot". Bing Maps (actually aerial? satellite? photography) shows it in great detail.

Moonraker

Get hold of military OS maps very detailed....................OSA covered though!

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I have ordered paper copies of the area my ancestors lived in going back to 1910 and previous to that. They are very good and I enjoy getting them out from time to time or taking them up with me on visits to show family and friends how much the area has changed over the centuries.

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