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Remembered Today:

Wound Stripes


chrisharley9
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Can any Pal let me know how a soldier would qualify for a wound stripe eg what records were kept, what causes of injury counted etc please

All The Best

Chris

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Can any Pal let me know how a soldier would qualify for a wound stripe eg what records were kept, what causes of injury counted etc please

All The Best

Chris

Hi Chris.

Sorry no info. Ive been watching your thread hope you get some feed back soon.

Im interested in this as well. As one of my family members had a wound patch as well.. Ive been looking on the net. But no luck.

Sandra

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Guest Ian Bowbrick

Chris,

A soldier would have to be wounded and evacuated to at least a CCS rather than 'stay at duty'. This would be recorded in his service record as 'wounded in action'. Being gassed was not regarded as being being wounded in action. Now I am sure someone will come along with the relevant AOs to prove or disprove, but this is what I have seen written in dozens of service records in WO 363/364 at the PRO.

Ian :)

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As a slight aside does anyone know the most wound stripes received by a soldier?

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Guest Ian Bowbrick

Someone in the National Roll of Birmingham was credited with having 7. My great uncle had 4 or so the photo I have of him taken in 1919 shows.

Ian

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I have the National Roll for Birmingham, do you happen to know the chaps name?

I am right in thinking that John Skinner VC was having a competition with his brother, as to who received the most wounds, or was this just urban myth?

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Chris

Like Sandra I don't really know the regulations surrounding the award of these stripes but am interested in your question. Although there were 2 wound stripes in among the WW1 items in my possession I had to ask on the forum to be sure what they were.

Someone more knowledgable will respond to this thread soon.

My impression is that they were meant to be worn to show a reason why a soldier was not at the front. Perhaps they were awarded if a soldier had been hospitalised after a wound gained in active service, which had required hospital treatment for a designated period.

There. That should bring a few challenges.

Kate

Just seen Ian's post but I'm leaving this anyway.

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Being shot through the stomach definitely counted.

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It is odd though reading this thread. My "pet" research soldier Capt P F Davy MC had two wound stripes, he was shot in the ankle and gassed, there is no other record of his being wounded, so maybe being gassed did count for a wound stripe. That said I bow to Ian's superior knowledge on these matters.

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Canadians also included being gassed as wounded as shown on the Certificate of Service below.

Regards

N.S.Regt.

post-1-1097796596.jpg

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A very knowledgeable friend of mine once told me that the determination of just who was or was not wounded sometimes was related to their time away from their unit. I will talk to him tomorrow to firm up the details, but I think it was something like if the man was gone more than three days it counted as a wound. Obviously, I have also seen notations such as "slightly wounded, remained on duty" or qwords to that effect.

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Guest Ian Bowbrick

Perhaps the severity of damage to the body having been gassed counted. I am just mindful of a silver war badge I have where the roll states wounded or sick for everyone else except the soldier who had my SWB, where it simply says 'Gassed'. I seem to remember this being discussed before.

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Thanks everyone - my grandad had 3 wound stripes & 1 was for being gassed.

All The Best

Chris

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Hello again Chris,

I just talked to my friend and he had spent lots of time going over various Part 2 Orders,etc., in connection with writing the unit history of the 26th Battalion.

From his research, it would appear that if a soldier was wounded and evacuated to a medical unit (Fd Ambulance, CCS, hospital,etc.), if it was determined that he would be gone for at least three days, he was struck off the strength of the battalion to the hospital. This sometimes took more than three days, as the unit had to hear from the medics regarding the man. This made the fellow officially wounded.(Don't you love military bureaucracy?)

Later in the war this was changed for various reasons. For example, what about the fellow who is slightly wounded in a battle, gets himself bandaged up, and carries on until the fighting ends. He then goes back to the aid station, where his slight wound might be rebandaged but otherwise he would never really leave the line. Under the existing policy was he really wounded?

By about 1917 some time, if the man's name was posted in the battalion casualty list, whether or not he was gone for three or more days, he was considered entitled to the wound badge.

Anyway, that is the view of my buddy, and he has devoted decades in researching this one Canadian battalion (besides amassing a collecting over over 150 medal groups to the unit).

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Like Sandra I don't really know the regulations surrounding the award of these stripes but am interested in your question.  Although there were 2 wound stripes in among the .

Hi Kate.

Found this info on Wound stripes. In July 1916 wound stripes were introduced into the British army. One stripe was issued on each occasion an officer or soldier appeared on the casualty lists as ( wounded ) retrospective to the beginning of the war.

Self inflicted wounds naturally did not count,nor initially did the mans appearance in lists marked, " wounded - gas " ( initially considered to be self -inflicted or wounded- shell shock. The rules for the award of wound stripes gradually become more complex, In 1919 the rules were expanded to allow wounds sustained. in any campaign prior to WW1 to count.

But this was rather short-lived. as the wound badge was discontinued at the same time as the overseas service chevrons in nov 1922.

The wound stripes were made 2" long gold Russia braid. & were worn. vertically on the left sleeve of the jacket, below any applicable service.

chevrons, with lower end of stripe about 3 " from the bottom of the sleeve, the stripes were provided in one stripe, two stripes & four patches. Well that was abit of typing !!! its 4.45am have not been to sleep yet. Is it worth it now ha ha. birds up Sandra

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Yes Sandra. It was a lovely bit of typing and very useful to me.

It explains and settles family discussions as to why my father who was wounded in April 1915, is not wearing wound stripes on various photographs in uniform between 1915 & summer 1916, although the stripes were among his possessions.

The stripes he had were goldish coloured metal, not braid.

Thank you for staying up all night typing that information.

You're a star.

Kate

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Yes Sandra. It was a lovely bit of typing and very useful to me.

 

It explains and settles family discussions as to why my father who was wounded in April 1915, is not wearing wound stripes on various photographs in uniform between 1915 & summer 1916, although the stripes were among his possessions.

The stripes he had were goldish coloured metal, not braid.

Thank you for staying up all night typing that information.

You're a star.

Kate

hello Kate.

Glad i could help. Ive had so much help off of everyone here thought it was my

turn. I was interested in the wound stripes as my Great uncle had 2 of them. Yet to research into that. Which i am doing. i did not know what they were till i put the photo on here. As for staying up late . Well waiting for my teenage daughter to come home !!!!

Sandra

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This has given me a lot of food for thought so thanks to everyone who has contributed

All The Best

Chris

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