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Direct from the trenches


towisuk

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From today's "Independent".....The history of some objects that contributed to the Legacy of WW1.....taken from Peter Doyles book....'The First World War in 100 Objects'

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/history/direct-from-the-trenches-the-objects-that-defined-the-first-world-war-9174995.html

regards

Tom

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Thanks for posting Tom. Interesting article and great images of the objects.

Anne

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I have seen the chain mail mask worn by the tankies in a museum and thought it looked quite mediaeval then but when looking at the whole with the helmet, it looks even more so. If I hadn't been told what it was, I would have thought it something worn by mediaeval soldiers. The name of the trench coat advertised is a reminder of how our vocabulary has changed so much. If I had seen that word written down, I would have thought it to be some sort of a waterborne disease! Thank you for posting.

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I have seen the chain mail mask worn by the tankies in a museum and thought it looked quite mediaeval then but when looking at the whole with the helmet, it looks even more so. If I hadn't been told what it was, I would have thought it something worn by mediaeval soldiers. The name of the trench coat advertised is a reminder of how our vocabulary has changed so much. If I had seen that word written down, I would have thought it to be some sort of a waterborne disease! Thank you for posting.

From what I gather from others here better informed - Mike Haselgrove for one - the tank sallet and mask were never worn together, the sallet being withdrawn before the masks' delivery to France at the end of September 1917.

To that extent, while it looks good, the picture is sadly misleading.

Cheers,

GT.

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Thanks GT, I am learning! The separate items of kit still look as though they belong to a mediaeval period.

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