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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Pool of Peace


towisuk

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The Pool of Peace was living up to its name yesterday.................

regards

Tom

post-5284-0-97118600-1394108866_thumb.jp

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Thanks for posting Tom my photo shows the peaceful water-filled crater and a German bunker in which were found four soldiers killed by concussion from the blast, the diagram is taken from the book "Beneath Flanders Fields" ISBN 1-86227-237-9.

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Norman

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Hi Norman, unfortunately I didn't have time to walk round the crater yesterday, also the land all around was sodden. I had called at Packhorse Farm Shrine Cemetery beforehand, and just walking on the turf my shoes were sinking down into the soil..!!!

The photo of the crater I posted was lifted from a video I was shooting to do with the 5th Lincs who were opposite the Spanbroekmolen mill in 1915, the Germans detonated a mine under them killing 17 men...

Thanks for the info on the bunker mate, I hope it's a bit drier next time I'm over there in the area and I have more time to wander round.......

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Tom it is amazing the results you can get today from a video still. As for the mud, well this is a scene near Spanbroekmolen with the Messines Ridge on the skyline.

1841001829_f7d29f8736_z.jpg

Regards

Norman

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Tom, thanks for posting the still from the video. As someone who obviously knows the pool well do you think the level of the water was particularly high given that it's clearly been very wet in the area? I was involved in a thread on the Messines mines and it made me wonder if the water level is controlled by pressure from below as well as general rainfall. I keep looking at photos from Spanbroekmoelen to see if I can see a difference.

Pete.

Norman, another good photograph; where mud is concerned, black and white is best.

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Tom, thanks for posting the still from the video. As someone who obviously knows the pool well do you think the level of the water was particularly high given that it's clearly been very wet in the area? I was involved in a thread on the Messines mines and it made me wonder if the water level is controlled by pressure from below as well as general rainfall. I keep looking at photos from Spanbroekmoelen to see if I can see a difference.

Pete.

Norman, another good photograph; where mud is concerned, black and white is best.

Hi pete... I was wondering about the water level myself given the amount of rain they appear to have had lately, but to be honest I think there must be a natural flow from the crater that maintains a fairly constant level.

It always appears to be at the same height every time I pop in when passing....

Maybe some more knowledgeable person on the forum can answer your query regarding the water level.....

regards

Tom

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Hi pete... I was wondering about the water level myself given the amount of rain they appear to have had lately, but to be honest I think there must be a natural flow from the crater that maintains a fairly constant level.

It always appears to be at the same height every time I pop in when passing....

Maybe some more knowledgeable person on the forum can answer your query regarding the water level.....

regards

Tom

Thanks Tom, that was my feeling. There is a whole thread that you can read if you suffer from insomnia about the underlying geology to which I contributed most of the drivel. Fortunately Peter Doyle acted as the responsible grown-up so it had some merit. I have a theory that apart from some lateral soak away the route of the explosion to the surface may allow groundwater up from below to maintain the level. It's one of the ideas I have for a geriatric Phd thesis. I know, I need to get out more.....

Pete.

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I'm of the impression that the major underlying geology may be Ypres clay....very much like the stuff my machines used to move by the 100.000's of tons here in North Lincs, to get to the ironstone beneath.

It is almost impervious to water, so any flow of water would have to be above the clay level among the underlying soil and other geological deposits...

Tom

Edit...found this.......

post-5284-0-03658100-1394137627_thumb.jp

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Tom, you've found the Messines mine thread by the looks of it. Professor Doyle's diagram, from the Geology of the Western Front published by the Geological Society of GB, well worth a read. They say a picture paints a thousand words. I know the ironstone deposits of Lincolnshire from one or two muddy geology field trips when I was at college in Leicester. Happy days.

Pete.

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Ok Pete, you will know the depth of the clay we have up here, hundreds of feet of it on top of the ironstone deposits. One of my weekly jobs was the electrical maintenance on the three BIG draglines we had here, one of them a Ransome Rapier W1800 had a jib length of 303 feet, I used to carry 1 kilowatt light fittings up and down the jib for repairs...now I have knee problems...!!!!

But I wouldn't have changed that job for all the tea in china..... I still have some borehole drill reports giving the geology of the overlaying strata kicking about somwhere....

Tom

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Tom it is amazing the results you can get today from a video still. As for the mud, well this is a scene near Spanbroekmolen with the Messines Ridge on the skyline.

1841001829_f7d29f8736_z.jpg

Regards

Norman

Funnily enough I video'd the ridge from Packhorse Farm cemetery Norman to get an idea of the lie of the land that the attack had to go over in '17...... and your photo of the ploughed fields is just as it was yesterday mate.....

regards

Tom

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Ok Pete, you will know the depth of the clay we have up here, hundreds of feet of it on top of the ironstone deposits. One of my weekly jobs was the electrical maintenance on the three BIG draglines we had here, one of them a Ransome Rapier W1800 had a jib length of 303 feet, I used to carry 1 kilowatt light fittings up and down the jib for repairs...now I have knee problems...!!!!

But I wouldn't have changed that job for all the tea in china..... I still have some borehole drill reports giving the geology of the overlaying strata kicking about somwhere....

Tom

I am a big fan of the county of Lincolnshire (my old Dad spent much of the war there and I used to take him back on occasion), but the mud I'll pass on. Give me the Wolds anytime. Looking again at Peter's diagram I am convinced that my doctorate is onto a winner. I reckon that the water in the Peace Pool is controlled by the water pressure in the saturated Kemmel sands layer below.

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Another shot taken from video....

From the left hand side of Kruisstraat craters (just seen on the right), Spanbroekmolen hiding behind the farm buildings and Lone tree cemetery...

The amount of water in the farm track tells you how much rain must have fallen recently.....

Tom

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