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Advice on 1915 peaked cap


geluveld

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I have been offered this peaked cap.

Has all the features of a genuine cap, but I'd like to be sure that I buy a decentitem before parting with some hard-earned money...

Thaks very much in advance for any help...

(Photo from inside is a bit stretched, and can't get it just right. But it's there more for the view of the interior date, stamp, peak, ...)

post-8975-0-25620800-1394104250_thumb.jp

post-8975-0-05575000-1394104264_thumb.jp

post-8975-0-48717900-1394104275_thumb.jp

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Not ww1. Is a later cap. Has been discussions on this makers stMp before. Is featured in a book as ww1 but is an error.

Regards

TT

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Hi Looks like 1945 although the lower half is rubbed away where it would not usually be by everyday wear. The joining where the band meets the top appears to be of the later style with the stitching visible.

Regards

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I have been offered this peaked cap.

Has all the features of a genuine cap, but I'd like to be sure that I buy a decentitem before parting with some hard-earned money...

Thaks very much in advance for any help...

(Photo from inside is a bit stretched, and can't get it just right. But it's there more for the view of the interior date, stamp, peak, ...)

This is the text from the website of the Company, C.W Headdress Limited which was formally J. C. Compton, note the reference to J. Compton Sons & Webb commencing trading in the 1930s.

If they did not commence trading until the 1930s, that could not be a WW1 period cap, as the other posters have already indicated.

Regards,

LF

" C.W Headdress Limited (formerly Compton Webb Headdress) has been operating since 1996 as part of the Christy' & Co business.

Everything from the cork and cloth dome shaped helmets to uniform caps is produced at the Christys’ factory in Oxfordshire. Most of the UK’s Police force are wearing Christys’ handmade police helmets and caps. C W Headdress also make safety hats for Police around the world as far as Calgary (Police Helmet) Canada and Botswana (Police Bowler).

C.W Headdress is only one of three manufacturers producing Custodial Helmets in the UK.

The history of the protective Police Helmet is rooted in the Miners Strikes of 1984 in South Wales when it was decided that more head protection was needed after a harrowing image of a Policeman, lying on the ground with head injuries made the paper.
Prior to this all Police hats were made of wool felt and hardened with Shelac.
Over the years C.W Headdress have dealt with contracts for the MOD, United Nations and regional contracts with many of the UK Police Forces.
Back in C.W Headdress's early days they also manufactured the safety helmets, commonly called the Corker, worn by scooter riders (scooterists).

C.W Headdress before Christys'

J. Compton Sons & Webb was founded in 1899 and began trading in the 1930s. The company had a name change to Compton Sons & Webb after the Second World War, although it was still referred to as J Compton Sons & Webb until 1978 when it was bought out.
The company manufactured the Military uniforms from head to toe with factories across the UK; each specialising in one form of apparel. "
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Thanks very much

Great war forum saved me from spending about 300quid on a dodgy cap.

Will inform the seller about the authenticity of the cap and I don't expect him to be very happy about it...

Thanks again

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I have a feeling that the Compton Stamp in your cap also appears in caps that have been previously agreed as being post WW1 but with a doctored stamp in them. There will be others such as Joe Sweeney who will confirm my statement or otherwise. Its also difficult from your photos to make out the length of the peak which looks a little too long to be WW1 period.

regards

Mark

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The history of Compton, Sons and Webb has been discussed before in this thread:

http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=192934

Joe Sweeney gave the date of the Compton/Webb merger as probably 1922, and the information I have seen shows that even as late as 1921 the London Street Directory/London Street Listings Index listing for Old Ford Road gives "404 to 422 - Compton J and Sons Ltd, army clothiers" - no mention of Webb at all. Suffice to say anything bearing the style of makers mark shown with a WW1 date or supposedly of WW1 vintage should be regarded as suspect at best...

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