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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Football Remembers


Steven Broomfield

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Apologies if this has already been posted, but today's Tottygraph highlight's the FA's trip to the Western front. (I particularly like the line that an injured Premiership player might attend ... too much to expect them to think about arranging something decent I suppose). Anyway, interesting piece.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/football/10674436/Great-and-good-to-be-honoured.html

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I see that the QPR footballer, Leslie Lintott, also played for Plymouth Argyle, Bradford United, Leeds City and England at Amateur and Professional level, is on the list.

A shame that the Club don't seem to know anything about him....

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Thanks for posting this Mr B; it is very interesting. I wonder if it will start a trend.

Pete

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Given the way things are these days, probably two minutes' applause at the Cenotaph.

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I reckon I could do a decent tour of the whole of the western front just by visiting the graves and memorials of the dead of the three Everton football clubs; I've got 16 all told. I'm just waiting for Mr Martinez's call. I'd quite like to show them all to Wayne Rooney to throw into sharp relief that being paid "only" £250,000 a week isn't really all that bad. Or am I becoming irritable in my old age (irritable owl syndrome maybe)?

Pete.

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You might have to give him a lesson in the Great War first Pete ... maybe this would help

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Ladybird-Histories-First-World-War/dp/0723270856/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1393965597&sr=8-1&keywords=ladybird+ww1

A tour like that would do them the world of good!!

Hope all well with you mate

Jim

James, you've sent me a link to Amazon. For a book. How novel (if you will pardon the pun). I know that various Australian cricket teams have stopped off at Gallipoli and Villers-Bretonneux on their way over and I think Andrew Strauss took the England team over to the battlefields at least once. I thought of this while reading Maldon's post of a photo of Colin Blythe's grave at Ypres. I was doing some research today on the local papers for August 1914 and my mate Billy came across a report from around 1924 about an Everton player called Billy Kirsopp. Kirsopp had gone through the war serving with the Scots Guards (which is going some); but was imprisoned for three months after selling some furniture and a piano which had been bought on the never never. He had lost all his life savings (£750) in the failure of a friendly society and he said there was not a penny in the house save the dole.

Born, know, don't, they're. Make up a well known phrase or sentence using these words.

Pete.

Pete.

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Sorry Pete, couldn't resist! What a sad story, but one that needs telling. Do you know what happened to Kirsopp afterwards? I am not a football fan, but I was in the Records Office last week and it researching something else I happened to keep coming across references to a local football team: them joining up; some on home leave while in training, commenting to the local reporter; some of their letters from France quoted by loved ones in the paper; shock at the first one wounded and returning home ... then comes Aubers Ridge 9th May 1915 ... the deaths, the woundings, the missing. The final few accounts, of the missing now presumed dead; the died of wounds; the amputations ... as I say not my main focus of research, but as I ploughed through the newspaper I witnessed the destruction of this village team ...

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Jim

I am ashamed to say I don't but I know a man who can find out.

Pete.

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Hi chaps. This thread makes me think about one of our Maldon casualties, a West Ham Pal:

POWELL, BERTIE ALAN

Private (31566) Essex Regiment (13th Battalion) (“West Ham Pals”)

Born in Chelmsford. Son of S.A. Powell of Chelmsford. Lived in Heybridge. Husband of Nellie Powell of 28 Well Terrace, Heybridge. Before the war (from 1906) he was the Hon. Sec. of Heybridge Football Club.

Died 28/4/1917 (aged 36)

Arras Memorial (Bay 7)

Died during the ill fated attack on Oppy

Regards.

SPN

Maldon

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Here he is.

post-43629-0-42005300-1394046754_thumb.j

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And this of course.

Regards.

SPN

Maldon

post-43629-0-70108600-1394047483_thumb.j

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Maldon, he may still be somewhere in these fields with plenty for company sadly. The tip of Oppy Wood with the Loos slagheaps and Vimy Ridge on the horizon.

Pete.

post-101238-0-10770300-1394047514_thumb.

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My goodness Pete. Thanks for posting.

Best regards.

SPN

Maldon

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My wife's grandfather - Driver (21032) John Richardson, 17 Div. RFA, is the football captain in this picture. Can you imagine what was going through their minds in this first season post-war. They had survived but many of their mates hadn't.

SPN

Maldon

post-43629-0-27543900-1394047965_thumb.j

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Cracking photo; my grandfather was a driver in the RFA too. One of my research interests are the amateur players of Everton FC of Auckland, New Zealand who appear to have joined up more or less to a man. The club folded after the Great War as no fewer than eight members died, six on the Western front and no fewer than three around the Bellvue Spur near S'Gravenstafel.

Pete.

P.S. Isn't there a plaque to the West Ham Pals at the Boleyn Ground? Tony Cottee (fondly remembered in these parts) took part in the unveiling before a game against Everton.

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Pete,

Seeing your interests - I have a plaque to a chap who although not a footballer always reminds me of Everton. His service papers show when he joined up he was living at 7, Gwladys Street, Liverpool. I don't know if he was a supporter, but certainly on the doorstep.

Regards,

Spud

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Pete,

Seeing your interests - I have a plaque to a chap who although not a footballer always reminds me of Everton. His service papers show when he joined up he was living at 7, Gwladys Street, Liverpool. I don't know if he was a supporter, but certainly on the doorstep.

Regards,

Spud

Spud, that's fascinating. Which regiment/battalion did he end up in or is he a man of mystery? Funny to think that my maternal grandmother went to Gwladys St School before the Great War. It's a small world.

Pete.

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P.S. Isn't there a plaque to the West Ham Pals at the Boleyn Ground? Tony Cottee (fondly remembered in these parts) took part in the unveiling before a game against Everton.

Yes.Forum member At Home Dad (if memory serves) was the driving force behind the memorial.

Up the Hammers!!

http://westhampals.blogspot.ie/

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Pete,

Gunner Roger Williams of the RGA. He was also living in Gwladys St in 1911, - he might have had his windows put through depending on the size of the

Gwladys St end back then, and the quality of the strikers on show.

Spud

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Pete,

Gunner Roger Williams of the RGA. He was also living in Gwladys St in 1911, - he might have had his windows put through depending on the size of the

Gwladys St end back then, and the quality of the strikers on show.

Spud

Funnily enough I've been doing a bit of research on one of the said strikers, a man called Alexander Simpson (Sandy) Young who was sold in 1911 to Tottenham, a decision which caused outrage amongst the faithful by all accounts. In the same census he was lodging just the other side of Stanley Park. He was by all accounts a moody and rather unstable man who emigrated to Australia in 1913 to join his brother. There they had a catastrophic argument which ended with Sandy shooting his brother dead. He was tried and convicted of manslaughter in 1915 and served the war years in prison.

The quality of Everton's strikers was not great between 1911 and 1913 when they signed Bobby Parker from Rangers for £1,500. He was top scorer in 1913-14 and 1914-15 winning the Championship in the only season played entirely during wartime. Sadly Parker was never the force he was after the war as a result of returning from Mesopotamia with a bullet lodged in his back.

Pete.

P.S. The Gwladys St was lower than the current Archibald Leitch stand in 1911 but I think the danger to Gunner Williams house would be to roof tiles rather than windows.

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Lovely thread developing here.

I got involved in providing information on Bertie Powell for the West Ham memorial.

Regards.

SPN

Maldon

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Gunner Roger Williams of the RGA.

Spud, would this be Gunner Roger Asaph Williams buried in Vlamertinge New? I've never visited that one; when I'm in that area I'm inevitably on the way to Brandhoek and the grave of Noel Chavasse. Perhaps I need to make a detour next time.

Pete.

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I did a little research on Ernest Colpus who played professional football for Croydon Common, a team I admit I'd never heard of. Apparently they were the only first division team not to restart after ww1. He too suffered career ending injuries according to his pension papers. There must have been some great battalion football teams with some of the lads joining up.

Spud

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