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emjayen

Serjeant or Sergeant?

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Steven Broomfield
1 hour ago, Uncle George said:

R. Money Barnes ... agrees with Jim Clay: .”

 

Wise man, Colonel Barnes.

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Uncle George
14 minutes ago, Steven Broomfield said:

 

Wise man, Colonel Barnes.

 

Major Barnes. An Honorary Major.  I did some research on the good Major which ended up on ‘Lives of the First World War’. So now it’s not accessible. 

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Steven Broomfield

Well, he should have been a Colonel.

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Muerrisch

Were he here, he might agree,

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OxonRfn
15 hours ago, Uncle George said:

R. Money Barnes, in his ‘A History of the Regiments and Uniforms of the British Army’ (1950), agrees with Jim Clay: “SERGEANT: From French Sergent, derived from Latin serviens = serving.”

Both Jim Clay and Barnes are perfectly correct. What seems to be overlooked is that exactly the same statement applies to the 'J' spelling; SERJEANT: From the French Serjant, derived from Latin serviens = serving. There are multiple recorded Old French spellings of sergeant including both Sergent and Serjant, with the same Etymology originating from the Latin Serviens.

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laughton

Thanks for this topic and the Google search engine which revealed the discussion!

 

As a Canadain, I had thought the British always used the "J" whereas we Canadians use the "G".

 

Searching the CWGC I was checking on those holding the rank of "Company Serjeant Major" only to find they are all listed as "Company Sergeant Major". Raised my curiosity. It can trip you up, as the CWGC database does have a listing for CSM's with the "J". There are 3,243 of them listed as such (CWGC Link), mainly in the UK, but that failed to reveal those in the Royal Marine Light Infantry (CWGC Link). Those ten (10) have the "G" (CWGC Link).

 

If you just check on all the G" based CSM's there are 466 of them (CWGC Link) but only fourteen (14) in the UK. The extra four are expalined by two that are an alias, one a Rhodesian policeman and one a Royal Marine Engineer.

 

One question always raises another, as I now wonder why the CWGC lists the RMLI CSMs as "NAVY" if the left the ADMIRALTY on 29 April 1916 (LLT Link)? Tradition?

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