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museumtom

Canadian skull 'identified' as Dublin soldier

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museumtom

The only problem I have with this 'identification' is that his body was not lost and is buried in LA CHAUDIERE MILITARY CEMETERY, VIMY.

Come on lads what am I missing? The found body must be someone else or am I reading this wrong somewhere?.

Kind regards.

Tom.

http://fineprintnyc.com/blog/3d-printing-helps-identify-world-war-i-soldier

http://data2.collectionscanada.gc.ca/cef/5001-6000/5455-46.pdf

http://jeremybanning.co.uk/2011/02/25/remains-of-canadian-great-war-soldier-finally-identified-private-thomas-lawless-49th-battalion-cef/

LAWLESS, THOMAS

Rank:

Private

Service No:

183425

Date of Death:

09/06/1917

Age:

28

Regiment/Service:

Canadian Infantry

49th Bn.

Grave Reference

II.B.1B

Cemetery

LA CHAUDIERE MILITARY CEMETERY, VIMY

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centurion

Number of possibilities including a mis identification of the original body buried at Vimy - not at all impossible when bodies may have been disinterred and reburied when the final cemeteries were established.

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museumtom

Thank goodness for that, I thought I was having a senior moment.

Thanks Centurion.

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KevinBattle

I think the newspaper reports clarify somewhat:-

Press reports indicate that his remains, along with those of 808723 Private Herbert Peterson of the same battalion, were discovered during a road-building project. Private Peterson’s remains were positively identified in 2007 and were buried with full military honours at La Chaudière Military Cemetery in Vimy in the same year. He was killed on 9 June 1917 near Avion and his remains were found by construction workers in 2003.
It took six years of research and testing before forensic scientists and DNA specialists could positively identify Thomas Lawless. The remains of both men had been returned to Canada because metal insignia identified their battalion and nationality. Thomas Lawless’s details are recorded in the CWGC register. Interestingly he is reported as being buried in La Chaudière Military Cemetery in Vimy, despite the service not taking place until 15 March 2011. The service will take (took?) place with members of his Irish family in attendance.

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centurion

I think the newspaper reports clarify somewhat:-

Press reports indicate that his remains, along with those of 808723 Private Herbert Peterson of the same battalion, were discovered during a road-building project. Private Peterson’s remains were positively identified in 2007 and were buried with full military honours at La Chaudière Military Cemetery in Vimy in the same year. He was killed on 9 June 1917 near Avion and his remains were found by construction workers in 2003.
It took six years of research and testing before forensic scientists and DNA specialists could positively identify Thomas Lawless. The remains of both men had been returned to Canada because metal insignia identified their battalion and nationality. Thomas Lawless’s details are recorded in the CWGC register. Interestingly he is reported as being buried in La Chaudière Military Cemetery in Vimy, despite the service not taking place until 15 March 2011. The service will take (took?) place with members of his Irish family in attendance.

Actually makes for more confusion. Is this implying that there was already a CWGC grave marked Lawless in the cemetery before 2011 and now there is a second one? If so has the first been changed to KUG?

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J Banning

His body was lost in the Avion raid in June 1917 and so, along with Peterson, his name was on the Vimy Memorial .

He was buried at La Chaudiere in March 2011 so, in due course his name will be deleted from the Vimy Memorial.

A pic of La Chaudiere from last year with the graves of Lawless and Peterson at the front. I have photos of heir names on the Vimy Memorial somewhere too.

post-16428-0-06289900-1390915350_thumb.j

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museumtom

Thank you for clearing that up for me.

Kind regards.

Tom.

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J Banning

It's a pleasure Tom. It is a fascinating story and the Canadian stance on doing their best to find identities for soldiers remains is admirable.

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Broznitsky

We have far fewer remains to try to find identities on. Unlike the British, French, German, Russian, etc.

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Michael Johnson

And our records are largely intact, so important informations such as height, chest size, are available.

Also at least for the Infantry your collar (earlier, shoulder) badges identified a unique battalion, not a regiment that might have dozens of battalions.

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