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Remembered Today:

Millar/Gearing/Ellis


SRD

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I have a wedding group photograph that includes the following serviceman standing in the bride's family group. The wedding date is somewhere between January 1919 and December 1921 and depicts the wedding between one of my Hillman ancestors and a woman with one of the surnames Millar, Gearing or Ellis.

Can anyone identify the uniform or, at best, the individual depicted.

I'm afraid that I no longer have the original photo but I do have a much larger copy than that posted here although the serviceman is pretty blurred in that.

Thanks.

post-89055-0-60404300-1388691970_thumb.j

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Found a wedding between William H(erbert) Hillman (b 1890) and a Kate Ellis December qtr 1921 Cuckfield Sussex. This lad looks very young and is wearing his medal ribbons, now Kate Ellis had a brother named James born c1900 could be him methinks, pity the cap badge is blurred. Ralph.

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Thanks. I knew the marriage was one of the possibilities for the photo but there are things that militate against it. As Sue has pointed out in the parallel thread on a VAD who also appears in the picture it would have been most unusual for a VAD to still be in service early in 1920 let alone late 1921. Also, although I haven't shown it, there is a young lad in the photograph who is wearing a pair of socks with a fancy top who also appears, in the same socks, in a wedding photo that is definitely dated 1919. I'm not sure the socks would have survived two years.

I've attached the two photos, 01 is the original for this thread, 02 is the one dated last quarter 1919.

post-89055-0-56128200-1389125808_thumb.j

post-89055-0-55629500-1389125829_thumb.j

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  • 4 weeks later...

The medals were introduced after the end of the war and servicemen and women were entitled to wear them wherever and whenever they wanted, it was their entitlement, just as ex soldiers etc wear ribbons today. In my days serving in the Prison Service many old "screws" used to wear the ribbons of the 2nd WW on their uniform jackets, this practice was frowned upon though a good many years ago as "inflammatory" to the inmates as the wearing of uniform hats is now. Ralph.

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Looking carefully at the 2nd photo, he looks to be sporting a single chevron on his left lower sleeve = one years overseas service I think. Cannot make out the image on his right lower sleeve unfortunately. Ralph.

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Thanks again, unfortunately the serviceman in the second photo isn't the same one as in the first, the good people here have already pretty much identified him as one of the brothers of the groom in the first photo (see http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=178244&hl). From the layout of the first photo the groom's family are to the left (as you look at the picture) and the bride's to the right. Assuming Sue is correct about the VAD uniform the photo has to be pre 1921 but, as I now understand it, the Victory Medal wasn't issued until September 1919 so, if the ribbons are those, it dates the wedding to somewhere between September 1919 & late 1920, that means that the bride is probably Grace Lily Millar, the groom Ernest James Hillman and the wedding took place in the first quarter of 1920.

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Just an observation on the first photo, perhaps obvious - you will notice there are no leaves on the tree (an oak) behind the wedding group which would point to winter / early spring, so would fit with first quarter of 1920.

The hedge, etc. behind the group in the second photo is in full leaf, so spring / summer time (second or third quarter of the year).

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Didn't think the second photo "related" (pardon the pun) to the first, but on the second image this soldier has what appears to be a badge (cloth) on his upper right sleeve which might be of RAMC origin, as you thought in post no3 a cross on a white circular background. Just a thought after looking at other RAMC images. Ralph.

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Just an observation on the first photo, perhaps obvious - you will notice there are no leaves on the tree (an oak) behind the wedding group which would point to winter / early spring, so would fit with first quarter of 1920.

The hedge, etc. behind the group in the second photo is in full leaf, so spring / summer time (second or third quarter of the year).

I had vaguely noticed it, and agree with you that photo 1 is definitely winter time, unfortunately photo 2 is of a wedding registered in the last quarter of 1919 so either the hedge etc. are evergreens or there was an Indian summer.

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Didn't think the second photo "related" (pardon the pun) to the first, but on the second image this soldier has what appears to be a badge (cloth) on his upper right sleeve which might be of RAMC origin, as you thought in post no3 a cross on a white circular background. Just a thought after looking at other RAMC images. Ralph.

The badge on his upper sleeve refers to the expedition to North Russia as discussed in the thread that the link takes you to. This puts that photo as post September 1919. The bride in photo 2 has strong familial facial characteristics with the mother and several of the men (her brothers) and the bridesmaids (her sisters, both of whom I knew personally) and, due to being the only elder sister, must be the object of that wedding.

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