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Mitter2k1

US Enlisted Collar Disks

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Mitter2k1

And a few Infantry disks

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Artillery- The disks with the cannons placed higher on the field are Coastal Artillery while the others are Field Artillery. Also the disk with the cannons over "58" is a coastal artillery disk. The TM disk is for Trench Mortars. These aren't very common and can be rather difficult to come by at a reasonable price.

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Miscellaneous branch disks.

"H" Headquarters

"T" Trains

Engineers A, D, and E

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Mitter2k1

These last two disks sometimes find themselves at the center of controversy among collectors. People will dismiss them and consider them fake or altered well after the war. They can be difficult to authenticate. This pair of "trenched" disks have the numbers scratched above the rifles. The left has 105 and the right 307 for their respective units. It was not uncommon for soldiers to add their unit numbers to their disks after they had been moved to the US right side disk. There are a number of ways this has been done and that includes scratching the number in with a sharp object or even stamping it in with the dog tag stamps. As with any of these, go with your gut feeling and let the price dictate to you if these are worth it or not. I acquired one from a dealer and he didn't even notice it was there and the other came from a well known auction site. Both were priced very reasonable and I did not feel that they were recently modified. So here they are and I will let you guys draw your own conclusions about them.

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Thanks again for checking out this thread. If anyone has any questions about collar disks, feel free to ask. And if you have a few of your own, no matter how plain or fancy, please feel free to add them here.

-Mike

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Mitter2k1

I forgot to add the identification for the 159 DB disk. That one is for the 159th Depot Brigade which was in charge of training troops.

Thanks

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Bonacker

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Hello to Mitter2K1 (Mike):

Do you have any thoughts about the collar seen in this portrait? It looks like a propellor to me, but no disk, no wings—? (I'm attempted to identify a relative, working backwards from his service, 1917-1919, when the portrait was taken.

Many thanks to you (and anyone else with ideas).

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Mitter2k1

Bonacker,

It appears to be the winged prop officer's insignia. You can almost make out the outline of the tops of the wings, or at least to me that is how it appears. There were a number of variations of officer insignia and this may be the one that has the "stubby" wings that hide in the shadows of this wonderful photo.

You said you are trying to ID this gentleman. It appears there is some sort of writing on the bottom right corner, or is it the studio name? There may be a lead for you to persue.

-Mike

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Bonacker

Thanks so much, Mike. The writing in the corner is the name of the portrait studio, Bachrach. They're still in business and I've actually already spoken to them, and they confirmed the dates I suspected (1917-19). It's a bit of a convoluted family story, but we are actually trying to determine if this lovingly saved portrait (someone long ago kept it push-pinned to a wall or cork-board, I can tell by the pin holes at the corners) might be of the illegitimate son (!) of my otherwise upstanding great-grandmother (!). We know who the natural father was supposed to be—we know who my very racy great-grandmother said she'd had an affair and a secret baby with—and this young man bears a striking resemblance. He's the right age, too. So it's a case of sleuthing. Thanks again—Bonacker

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Mitter2k1

Thanks so much, Mike. The writing in the corner is the name of the portrait studio, Bachrach. They're still in business and I've actually already spoken to them, and they confirmed the dates I suspected (1917-19). It's a bit of a convoluted family story, but we are actually trying to determine if this lovingly saved portrait (someone long ago kept it push-pinned to a wall or cork-board, I can tell by the pin holes at the corners) might be of the illegitimate son (!) of my otherwise upstanding great-grandmother (!). We know who the natural father was supposed to be—we know who my very racy great-grandmother said she'd had an affair and a secret baby with—and this young man bears a striking resemblance. He's the right age, too. So it's a case of sleuthing. Thanks again—Bonacker

This will be very interesting once you uncover his identity. Here are a few places for you start that may give you some assistance. If you know where he possibly lived at the time of his enlistment or discharge, that will be a great jumping off point. Try the county for names, especially the county historical society. They may have a copy of With the Colors for that county that you can take a look at and compare photos and see what his name is. I know the National Archives website has a number of those books digitized and you may be in luck starting there. Ancestry is obviously a good start, but unless you have a name, it is kind of useless. Also census records from the county your great-grandmother lived may be the key for you uncovering the information you seek. Try the 1900, 1910 and 1920 census as the names would/should be grouped by household. I hope this helps you on your journey.

-Mike

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Bonacker

Hello Again Mike: Those are all wonderful suggestions, and I'm really grateful to you for taking the time to help me out. Great forum!

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Mitter2k1

Hello Again Mike: Those are all wonderful suggestions, and I'm really grateful to you for taking the time to help me out. Great forum!

No problem, I am glad to be of assistance. I have been about neck deep in research for the last two years, so I am glad to pass on the methods that have worked for me. If you have any questions pertaining to research and how to go about it, feel free to send me a private message and I will help you out the best I can.

Thanks,

Mike

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hink441

Hello everyone,

This is my first post and I would like to introduce myself. My name is Chris and I live in Virginia USA. I have an interest in Virginia units that fought in the Great War, and I look forward to learning as much as possible from this forum!!

I have found this pin. I believe it is a North Carolina Officer's Machine Gun Batt. Collar device. Unfortunately I have never seen one like this before. Anyone ever seen this type?? This one appears to be hand made. Thank you. I just realized this is for Enlisted disks, I hope this is okay to post here.

Chris

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Here is the rear side. Has a nice "C" type hook.

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Mitter2k1

Welcome to the forum Chris. I believe you are correct and that this is a North Carolina Machine Gun officer's collar insignia. It has the wartime style of pin and the only thing I cannot say is whether it is a MG company or Battalion.

Thanks for sharing,

Mike

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hink441

Mike,

Thank you for the quick response and the kind welcome. It is good to know that my assumption on this pin appears to be correct. I believe the North Carolina NG machine gun companies were probably assigned to the 30th Division.

Chris

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4thGordons

Mike

Just stumbled across this locally.

Is there any reliable way of dating it? (It is a screw-back)

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Chris

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Mitter2k1

Chris,

That is a great disk! I want to say these were made after the version with the "curved" letters and prior to the USNG script style disks being authorized on 15 August 1917. I will have to double check with a couple of guys I know and see what they have to say. Unfortunately Scipio's book "The Collar Disk Story" does not give a time frame for these other than state disks were the standard up until August of 1917 when the USNG disks were authorized. Does this mean they could of been used during WWI, yes. I only say that due to the issues the Army had with getting disks on a timely manner and units often had to make do with what was available. Give me a day or so and I may have a more definite answer for you.

Thanks for sharing,

Mike

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hink441

Here is a Virginia National Guard collar disk.

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Mitter2k1

Here is a Virginia National Guard collar disk.

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That's a great and not very often seen disk. Thank you for sharing it.

Mike

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Mitter2k1

Here is an update to some of my collar disks that I have been neglecting for some time now, and I apologize for that. I log in at least once a week to take a quick read over a few new topics and have been slacking on making a contribution to the forum. For some reason, any topics I follow are removed within a day or so. So I may miss any replies to a topic I have started.

Anyways, moving forward here are all of my infantry disks as of a month or so ago when I took the photo. Sorry if the pics are a little blurry as the resizing software is causing the issue for some reason.

Quick note on the disks with letters only. The disk with MG under the crossed rifles is for a machine gun company and the disks with MG above the rifles is for a machine gun battalion. The MG A through D disks are the companies within the machine gun battalion.

Chris, you may find the trenched 131st Infantry disk interesting.

Thanks,

Mike

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AmandaWolff

Hi All!

 

I'm new here but found this site while researching a photo of my great-grandfather from WWI.  I see a collar disk in the photo (crossed canons and the number 64 underneath) but can't find anything about what it means.  Can anyone help?  

WWI.jpg

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Mitter2k1
4 minutes ago, AmandaWolff said:

Hi All!

 

I'm new here but found this site while researching a photo of my great-grandfather from WWI.  I see a collar disk in the photo (crossed canons and the number 64 underneath) but can't find anything about what it means.  Can anyone help?  

WWI.jpg

Hello

This a collar disk for the 64th Coastal Artillery Company. The difference between Field Artillery and Coastal Artillery is the placement of the numbers. Field is above and Coastal is below.

 

Thanks for bringing up this thread.

Mike

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Edoguy1305

Im not really sure if anyone looks here anymore, but I have a question regarding the collar disks on my machine gunner's tunic. I have seen in many photos of national guard division soilders that they have the US collar disk rubbed down to the bare metal. Was this a common thing? Did some national guards divisions order that they have their disks rubbed down if they weren't issued the ones that denote national guard? This uniform came out of Pittsburgh, so it could have belonged to a memeber of the 28th Infantry Division; which was a natioanl guard division. If anyone has any info that may shine some light on this situation, then I would be happy to hear it. 

Thanks!

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Edited by Edoguy1305

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Edoguy1305

Oh, and regarding "trenched" collar disks, I found this one in the back pocket of a pair of breeches that belong with my artillery tunic; just thought more examples wouldn't hurt.

The collar disk is for company C, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Division.This makes me believe that the artillery uniform belonged to someone in the 3rd Field Artillery Brigade, and the uniform did come from the San Francisco area, so it would make sense. The person who wore the Artillery uniform probably took it off a dead body, possibly a friend or an officer, and then forgot about it.

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Edited by Edoguy1305

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Bob MDC

Hi... I’m helping out someone trying to identify this US regiment  it has crossed rifles 51 PL.. Can  you help  ID it please?Thanks Bob

Sorry can’t seem to upload a photo.

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Edoguy1305

The crossed rifles means that it is infantry, and the 51 is the regiment number, so it would have belong to someone of the 51st Infantry regiment, 6th Division. Hope this helps.

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jim johnson

Hello, I am looking for a CO.G- 347th Inf.-please contact me if you have one for sale. My grand dad's unit 1918- Camp Dix, N.J.   Thank you,        jim.134@juno.com  Also I have a yarder photo of his Co. if anyone is interested in seeing it I will post it- Thanks

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Bibbleeye

Hi!  I'm brand new to this forum.  I'm looking for a collar disc that is for the 347th Field Artillery, and in particular, for Battery C.  Anyone have one they'd be willing to sell or where I could find one?  And any other items related to the 347th would be awesome.  Thanks!

Also, anything for Evacuation Hospital, No. 8 would be awesome as well

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