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rprest

Help identifying RFA Unit and Corps

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rprest

Hello - My first post to the forum and I wonder if anybody may be able to help me identify what Unit and Corps of the RFA my grandfather may have served in.

I'm starting to piece together the information about his time during the 1st World War, but of course could learn a great deal more (as I'm sure many of us would love to). Below is information from his (Richard Grandauch Prest, 82294) discharge papers.

I assume this would tell me information that would help me with my search, but I'm unable to decifer. Can anybody help?

Thanks of course in advance, and I would really appreciate any help anybody can offer!!

Richard Prest

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David Porter

Hello Richard,

Welcome to the Forum. You are very lucky to have so many pages of surviving service & pension record for your grandfather.

This unit is tricky to see but looking at earlier pages I'm sure he was RFA and attached to the 4th Motor Ambulance Convoy (part of the Army Service Corps).

More information here - http://www.1914-1918.net/asc.htm - bottom of page says this was also known as 421 ASC Company.

If there is anything else in his records you are unsure about there are plenty of people here to help out.

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rprest

Thank you! That is an enormous help, I am very grateful indeed! I just wish the rest of his life was so well documented, and not such a mystery.

I'm just curious, what did you see in his records that helped you identified this?

It's there anyway of being able to trace more specific details of where he may have been deployed?

Thank you once again

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battiscombe

yes, his records show that he was a very early enlistment in the first week of the wear and was posted to the newly formed 47th Brigade Ammunition Column as a driver in October it would seem .. and then the 16th Division Ammunition Column which moved from 16th Division to become the Guards Divisional Ammunition Column ..later in the Motor Ambulance Company... you can probably work out the date of transfer form the records.. which are often a bit unclear..

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rprest

Fantastic, thank you both of you. You have definitely helped fill in some blanks and helped the research continue!

I'm trying to restrain and not bombard you with questions.....

Am I correct in assuming the obvious, that the role of a driver in the Ambulance Company would be to ferry the wounded, whereas a driver elsewhere would be responsible for the movement of guns and equipment, etc. Richard worked previous as a farm hand, so I’m assuming his experience with horses would have led him into this position.

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battiscombe

Most transport was horse drawn, at least initially. Within the artillery all movement of guns and ammunition [the role of ammunition columns..] would have been horsedrawn ... by 'Drivers'. As most farm labourers would have experience of horses this doubtless assisted. I imagine the transfer to an Ambulance continued that role, but as it became a 'motor' unit he may have acquired training as a motor driver.. still a rare skill in 1914 ... much more common, by 1918, thanks to the war...

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rprest

Thank you so much. I will now be looking at the records in more detail, it's hard to decifer much of the hand writing and code though so may come back with some more questions!

I'm struggling to identify when Richard joined the Motor Ambulance Company, i would say most likely at some point in 1917, I'm wondering if either of you spotted a date? I'm putting together a timeline of all the dates which will hopefully pin it down a bit more accurately.

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David Porter

It is hard to pin down when he joined the Motor Ambulance Convoy. Most of 1916 and 1917 details are missing or difficult to read. The only thing definite is that he was with them in October 1917 as he went sick at 62 Casualty Clearing Station and they reported his discharge in November 1917. A useful list at http://www.vlib.us/medical/CCS/ccs.htm shows that 62 C.C.S. was at Bandringhem at that time but I cannot find it on a map.

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rprest

Thanks. I've found some information on Bandagehem here. it would appear it was at was in Belgium, which of course fits.

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bullyman

PM sent

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bullyman

EMAIL SENT 

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