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2Bn Royal Irish Regiment 24 May 1915


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Greetings All,

I would be grateful for extracts from a war Diary if any exist of the 2nd Bat Royal Irish Regiment

Covering, May and early June 1915, or indeed the location of the R I Rg during that period.

My Great Uncle appears on a wounded list for the 5th of June 1915

Regards

Gerry

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Morning gerry

I dont have the WD I'm afraid, nor has it been digitalised yet.

Westlake states,

"Spent first week of June in billets near Poperinghe then to dugouts near the Yser Canal."

Thats it, I'm afraid,

Regards,

Graeme

PS. They were engaged at Bellewaarde Ridge on 24 may with 379 other ranks becoming casualties.

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Thanks very much Graeme,

The 24th May engaement looks very likley to be the place where he was wounded,I suspect a gas attack

Gerry

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You’re a gem Graeme,

I really appreciate that,have a good weekend .

Regards

Gerry

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You are "in luck" as 24 May 1915 2nd Royal Irish Regiment were attacked at Bellewaerde. Supposedly the youngest soldier of the Great War (Condon) was killed so quite a bit of research done concerning wounded, missing.

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I wonder is the highlighted T Condon the same as the one you mentioned. If so maybe my Great Uncle (J Cavanagh 9634) was wounded in the same place on the same day as Condon was. It would be great to be able to visit a place where my relative fought.

Gerry

RIRgt.pdf

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Seems to be same Condon! I was at the place where my Great Uncle died and your relative was. From Menin gate march out to Hellfire Corner (I was on foot) it is a few miles to Hooge cemetery almost opposite a cafe. Bellewaerde, near St Julien.

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Hi Glen,

I would say its the same Man

Gerry

Seems to be same Condon! I was at the place where my Great Uncle died and your relative was. From Menin gate march out to Hellfire Corner (I was on foot) it is a few miles to Hooge cemetery almost opposite a cafe. Bellewaerde, near St Julien.

Thats great news and thank you for the info .I am going to plan a visit for next year.So all the info I get will be important
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  • 5 months later...

Just picked up on this thread and have some info to add that may be of interest. This concerns Ashley Pole Pargiter (1st Bn. Royal Irish Regiment) who proceeded from the 1st Bn. to the 2nd Bn. R.I.Regt on 24 May 1915. The document was handwritten by Capt Pargiter and was found with a number of other documents that passed from my grandfather who was a Capt. in 1st Bn. R.I.Regt. Capt. Pargiter was later awarded the M.C. (reported in the Edinburgh Gazette 29/06/15) and finished WW1 as a Major in the RAF from which he left in Oct 1919. Currently I'm trying to identify all the people mentioned in the report but I'm having no luck with either 2nd Lieut. Leitch or Coy. Sgt. Major Lelliat. I've typed the report into a Word doc. but I can post a scan of the original. In the Gazette notification of his M.C. award it refers to Lieut. A.P. Pargiter ( temp. Captain). I think that Capt. Pargiter report gives a very good indication of the bloody fighting on that day, noting that he starts with about 20 men, gets some additions, and finally leaves with only 3. His report refers to a plan but that is not in my possession.

*************************************************************************

To OC. 2nd Bn. Royal Irish Regiment

From A P Pargiter Capt. Royal Irish Regiment

Statements of events on May 24th 1915

On 23rd May 1915 I proceed from 1st Bn. R.I. Regiment to join 2nd Bn. R.I.Regiment. I reported to Lt. Col. Moriarty in his “dug out” at 11.45pm. He ordered me to wait until “stand-to” (2.15am 24th) and then to take command of “B” Coy. I lay down there to get some sleep. I woke up hearing a confused shouting of “gas!” and feeling overpowered by the dense quantities of gas which were filling the trenches and the “dug out”. I rushed out and saw men streaming down the communication trench towards the rear. There was an officer with a fairly large light-brown moustache trying to stop the men. I joined him and we drove the men back up the communication trench marked AB on plan, turning to the right on reaching the fire trench. The men were all mixed up, there being a few territorials amongst them. I believe the latter belonged to the Northumberland Fusiliers and the Monmouths. When the gas cleared a little I opened steady fire on the German trenches. At about 3.15am the Germans attacked in great numbers. Their main attack was made by means of a trench running diagonally towards SHELL TRAP FARM and marked CD on plan. I was unaware of the existence and use of this trench as I was new to the ground. I turned a machine gun upon them from a point marked E on plan, reporting my action to Capt. Christie who was making his way up the trench. I then proceeded under his orders towards SHELL TRAP FARM. I was unable to reach it as the Germans were in occupation and had a machine gun there, enfilading us. I collected a few men with the idea of re-taking it, but was unable to get nearer than a point about 30 yards from it. This part of our trench was unoccupied by any living men. At this moment the enemy started to rush up our trench towards us. We opened fire and checked them but could not clear them out. We kept them back for about 20 minutes with rifles and hand grenades whilst I sent to Capt. Christie for help. My messenger returned, reporting that Capt. Christie had been killed and that I was the only living officer in the trench. We attempted to fix up a machine gun, but found the lock broken. We were then suddenly driven back by a hail of hand grenades from the Germans in our trench and also from our front. We retired traverse by traverse in the same manner towards the left of our line, holding each traverse for about half an hour by means of hand grenades and firing when possible. The Germans were using machine guns and rifle fire from the front and throwing bombs and grenades from their footing our trench. They kept and average distance of three traverses (20 to 25 yards) from us, in the same trench. I had about 20 men with me at this time. I went to call up more men but found the trench either deserted or full of the killed and wounded. I was unable to communicate with our Artillery as our wires were cut. I sent a message to the Kings Own Lancaster Regt. On our left for help and to telephone our Artillery. Their wires were also cut. They sent an office (2nd Lieut. Leitch) and a few men with boxes of hand grenades. This officer showed conspicuous bravery until wounded, by the help he gave me in throwing grenades. The Germans then started shelling our trench with wonderful accuracy with high explosive. My men were soon reduced to about 10 in number. Later on Coy. Sgt Major Lelliat (Kings Own Lancaster Regt.) arrived with more grenades and also showed great gallantry in throwing them, staying with me although wounded in the head.Eventually, I with three wounded men who were left of my party were forced back very nearly as far as the K.O.L. trenches. I went to the O/C Kings Own Lancaster Regt. and asked for support. He told me that he would do so. I then attempted to rejoin my men, but with gas effects and exhaustion could not proceed. What took place after that (about 10am) I am unable to state. At about 5.30 pm I regained consciousness and made my way to the Essex trenches and thence at night I was taken back to the dressing station. I saw nothing of any but the above-named officers except 2nd Lieut. Fairburn who was badly wounded in the head. I tied him up and sent for stretcher bearers but do not know what happened to him. I saw nobody in the act of surrendering but it was reported to me that some men in SHELL TRAP FARM (held by Royal Dublin Fusiliers) had done so when the Germans had captured it. When the Germans were in our trench they fired flares over us as a mark for their artillery. The Germans repeatedly hoisted a French flag made apparently of tin from their position in our trench . I did not understand their object. I am unable to draw the accompanying plan to scale or in detail as my first view of the position was taken after the gas and during the fighting. The times mentioned in this statement are only approximate. I am able to state that during the morning we inflicted very heavy casualties on the enemy. The above, to the best of my belief , is a true statement of what I saw of the events of the 24th May 1915.

A.P.Pargiter Capt.

1st Bn Royal Irish Regiment (att. 2nd Bn.)

22.6.15

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