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"BX ammunition" ---any ideas?


20th Division
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Anyone know what BX ammunition might be? I quote a reference from the 20th division ammunition column's diary of 28th August 1917.("Bletchley dump" was a little S.W. of Boesinghe --north of Ypres).

"Heavy enemy shelling set fire to BLETCHLEY dump consisting of about 10,000 rounds of ammunition destroyed with exception of 2,000rounds BX which was salved-----" ( the diary entry goes on to describe the bravery of an officer and some men who dealt with the fire and salvaged the "DX ammunition"). Thanks. David.

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Boxes or boxed?

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Good info.Any more info on what blue cross gas shells were appreciated. pics? size? what gas? etc. Thanks. David.

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I thought blue cross was German, along with yellow & green crosses. Can't say I can provide an alternative answer for BX or DX either though.

Cheers

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I thought blue cross was German, along with yellow & green crosses. Can't say I can provide an alternative answer for BX or DX either though.

Cheers

Yes, it was. The thread asks for ideas though.

Captured ammunition ? - or did the Allies use a similar nomenclature, formally or informally, for our equivalents.

Blue Cross was a lachrymatory usually fired in HE shells, so that the shell burst would not immediately be identified as gas shell.

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Blue Cross was a lachrymatory usually fired in HE shells, so that the shell burst would not immediately be identified as gas shell.

Without wanting to start an argument and being pedantic, Blue Cross was not a lachrymatory agent. It was usually diphenylchloroarsine in powder form which was designed to attack the upper respiratory tract of its victims, forcing them to remove their gas masks / gas hoods in an effort to breath properly. The idea was that after a bombardment of Blue Cross, a follow up attack of Green Cross (Phosgene) would be launched. By the time the Phosgene was dispersing, defending troops would have removed their gas protection because they couldn't breath properly.

However, yes, I hadn't considered the possibility that it could be captured ammunition. Good point, well made.

Still doesn't explain DX is though.

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Thanks for these. Do I take it that I can assume "BX" was 4.5 how' shrapnel shells?-------- or is it still open for discussion?

I really must mug-up on the range of British ammo types. Anyone recommend a good "readable" tome? Thanks again to those who got back to me. Appreciated. Dave.

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No, "BX" is 4.5 inch HE. 4.5 inch shrapnel is "B".

"Treatise on Ammunition 1915" and "Markings on Ammunition 1918" are good starting points. Both are available as reprints.

Regards

TonyE

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Thanks Tony

-----presumably good old naval and Military press. Best wishes David.

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