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Remembered Today:

Martin Feledziak

Marcin FELEDZIAK 1897 - Infanterie Regiment 171

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JOVE23

Update on my end as well,

 

I am still in search of Max's burial plat, though I have his Burial File!

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Martin Feledziak
18 hours ago, JOVE23 said:

Update

 

 

Greetings Jove.

 

I don't know if you saw post 834 on this thread there is an interesting image from the German POW reports.

It lists those taken prisoner on 5th October 1918 including the Sgt who wrote up the citation for Max.

 

Walter SZULAKIEWIEZ index card dated 5th October 1918

 

Although the report wrongly lists the regiment as 112. when it should be 127

 

Martin

 

I don't know how to link back to #834 in this thread but it is page 34.

 

See this also

https://valor.militarytimes.com/hero/83659

and for Max

https://valor.militarytimes.com/hero/82994

Edited by Martin Feledziak

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JOVE23

I did see that! Shame that it didn't list the regiment that took him prisoner!

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JOVE23

I've had a thought (scary, I know)...seeing that Max's citation says he was defending his position to 'reduce the amount of men likely taken prisoner,' maybe he and Sgt. Walter (not even going to try to spell that last name) and some others were covering the retreat of the rest of the platoons that were driven out of that shell crater?

 

There are several other bodies buried with Max, perhaps they too were killed in the same action?

 

6d499bd5ad733d7eea66acad7f3121a2.png

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Martin Feledziak
15 hours ago, JOVE23 said:

defending his position

 

Greetings Justin.

 

I think that is exactly what happened.

 

Those poor fellows were initially buried where they fell and later moved to the proper American cemetery at Romagne.

The cemetery is an awesome place and very well looked after. If I had known about Max I would have visited his cross.

 

I understand the regimental history for IR171 is due to be digitised and should be turning up on-line .

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JOVE23

I am hoping soon to find the map that shows where that original burial was. Wonderfully detailed work was done for our fallen doughboys immediately after the war.

 

For example:

 

5aef457677632_examplemap.jpg.ca27f72edbb6101728a500cc8a022949.jpg

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Martin Feledziak
On 5/6/2018 at 19:12, JOVE23 said:

original burial

 

Greetings Justin.

 

I have gone back and read over some previous posts and I am fairly certain that the below image identifies the original burial plot for Max.

 

The left section describes the location.

IE - GRAVE LOCATION BLANK form.

At location 04.3 - 82.4

Near Bois De Chene Sec

using GROUPS DES CANVES DE TIR Map - ( Very Map- VERDUN ) June 1918

 

The right section is from that map and I have added the blue Co-Ordinates 04.3 - 82.4

 

 

plot.jpg.efc7c139d497dcf801776da0686bcf06.jpg

 

 

I see that Max was from Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

coincidentally I passed through Milwaukee last week aboard an AM-Track train on route to a cruise in Alaska.

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JOVE23

Yes, I have that location but I understand I can get it more precise!

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Martin Feledziak

According to 251 Divisions-

 

The 115th Division were in Antwerp. They had been there since 18th April 1918.

On 21st May 1918,  the division were about to leave to Battle on the Marne.

They would board trains and route via

Brussels, Mons, Maubeuge, Le Cateau - Bohain and detrain North of St Quentin on 22nd May.

 

Marne.jpg.53946a2f77d2234599e6ff67a476158f.jpg

 

 

Edited by Martin Feledziak

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Martin Feledziak

The 37th Division was made up of elements of Infantry Regiments 147, 150 and 151.

 

37.jpg.eff6565a90ffed47e2359f98ab5d93b3.jpg

 

On 27th May 1918, The first day of the Aisne, the Division attacked near Presles and advanced via Braine as far as Troesnes Longpont Sector.

It was releived by 115th Division on 4th June.

 

5b029841a2cd5_37thDivision.jpg.374d9210d2a41ca3d64fbc8fea428b22.jpg

Edited by Martin Feledziak

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JOVE23

such wonderful information, keep it coming!

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Martin Feledziak

During late May 1918 the 115th Division would start a foot march, lasting 7 days from the Crepy area to Villers Helon.

 

1042726206_Route171.jpg.845d8eba6525238cb13efcd2e0d3319b.jpg

Edited by Martin Feledziak

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Martin Feledziak

So from reading a thread started by "Black Dudley" I see that this movement is known as " The German Spring Offensive"

which is where I have copied the overview map from.

 

I have added the approximate location of IR171 on 3rd June 1918

 

387358075_IR1713rdjune1918.jpg.8e5bacd393fb76cc9000ef5dff809709.jpg

 

 

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Martin Feledziak

Early June 1918 - The 115th Division were in the outskirts of LONGPONT and CORCY.

The first image is from the regimental history of IR136 which shows RIR 40 in the woods to the North of IR136 and IR171 to the South.

The second image is from the regimental history of IR171 with a purple X denoting company 10.

 

136.jpg.369c7b3d2244e5d2ba4070fce1b0b6e6.jpg

 

 

958391970_Skizze21.jpg.295d5e57789c7a357f1edd14fe3eb533.jpg

 

The German advance comes to an end.

I am sure that this is where Grandfather suffered some injury which necessitated evacuation to hospital in Nuremberg.

I have a photograph of him and others in hospital surroundings dated 28th June 1918.

 

Edited by Martin Feledziak

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Martin Feledziak

The Regimental History "Das Infanterie Regiment NR. 171" has now appeared on line - thanks to WURTTEMBERGISCHE LANDESBIBLIOTHEK STUTTGART

If only I could read German.

 

1990503378_IR171bookonline.jpg.148c4345b1b7344997ee58c411f7d81e.jpg

 

Edited by Martin Feledziak

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AliceF

That’s great! If you have any particular pages you want me to look at, just let me know. Maybe I can help.

Christine

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Martin Feledziak

5 hours ago, AliceF said:

Maybe I can help.

 

Hi Christine,

 

It is amazing that this history is now on-line after 100 years of the passage of time, I have always said that the Internet is a wonderful resource, obviously everything is not always truthful but at least we can make our own judgement on whatever is displayed.

I am sure I will need help and I am certain there will be times when I will ask you.

 

I already asked Jan (AOK4) if he could have a look through his printed version for anything relating to Kompany 10 during early June. He saw nothing obvious.

 

Martin

 

http://dfg-viewer.de/show/?tx_dlf

Edited by Martin Feledziak

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Martin Feledziak

This report was published on 5th July 1918. It indicates that he was lightly wounded.

It is most probable that this was as a result of battle in and around LONGPONT.

I have viewed the Roll of Honour for company 10 IR 171 and seen concentrations of reports for 3rd and 4th June and 13th and 22nd JUNE,

so he could have been injured at any time. The Division was not relieved until 19th July.

His hospital picture was postmarked 28th June. 

 

1869672425_Julyreport.jpg.8b476e486d5d3cf9c5bb774de93fad16.jpg

http://des.genealogy.net/search/show/8516777

Edited by Martin Feledziak

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Martin Feledziak

Here is Skizzie 21. I have overlaid the image onto current Google Earth satellite imagery.

Given that the book was printed in 1927 the scale and accuracy is a perfect fit.

 

The railway line is the main feature running from North to South and IR171 Battalion III is between the Railway and the road which runs from Longpont to Corcy.

I imagine that they just took cover in the woods as this would have been a battle or battles of movement.

 

885484596_overlayLongpont.jpg.b00a810227439fac5ebfee6ecec95ffc.jpg

 

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JWK
On 20/06/2018 at 16:00, Martin Feledziak said:

This report was published on 5th July 1918. It indicates that he was lightly wounded.

It is most probable that this was as a result of battle in and around LONGPONT.

I have viewed the Roll of Honour for company 10 IR 171 and seen concentrations of reports for 3rd and 4th June and 13th and 22nd JUNE,

so he could have been injured at any time. The Division was not relieved until 19th July.

His hospital picture was postmarked 28th June. 

 

http://des.genealogy.net/search/show/8516777

 

Check the "gefallen" entries on that same Verlustliste with the Volksbund Graebersuche

Gives you an approximate indication (and nothing more!) of when the report he was wounded arrived at the War Office.

In this case/list it's a wide indication: found "gefallen" soldiers from 20th of May upto 15th of June on a quick search......

 

But then he could, in principle, have been wounded weeks before, and the report to the War Office got delayed.

Also, he could have been wounded by a fluke shot. Karl Steigleder died from one on a misty morning, no battle in sight whatsoever, just "happily" digging new trenches....

"Wounded circa early June 1918 in the area of ...." would be a description I'm happy with. Unless some decisive information comes along.

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Martin Feledziak
5 minutes ago, JWK said:

"Wounded circa early June 1918 in the area of

 

Absolutely agree... And this type of research is like trying to knit with fog. BUT it is a fascinating history hunt. I am glad someone is reading my ramblings.

I am not even sure who IR171 were up against during early June 1918. I assume the French.

 

Today using my friend "Google translate" I have seen mention of their opponents being "87 Franz division" and they had tanks. ( no idea who they could be )

 

I wonder who had control of the railway line. 

ALSO

His 1919 studio portrait alludes to the award of an Iron Cross 2 - so where did he get that from ? 

It is possible that it was just costume posing.

 

In 1917 the Division were in Romania and he would have been aged 20.. So if he was to get a medal then the Longpont action would be the most probable.

 

All supposition  I know.

 

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JWK

The   87e divison d'infanterie Francaise

They were in Villers-Cotterrêts between 31st May and 12th of July 1918, which takes them perilously close to Longpont....

87.jpg.64360e2eb6dc3002ad349694ea6bd672.jpg

 

The French Wikipedia page says that their commander, Géneral Arlabosse was struck down with a brain hemorrhage on 2nd of June.

"From June 3rd, occupation of an area north of Longpont and the farm of Vertefeuille, moved left, June 12, to the farm Chavigny and Saint-Pierre-Aigle: June 12 and 13, violent fights"

 

 

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Martin Feledziak

WOW... Great Jan.

 

Well done, I did some searching today but found nothing, I am sure you are correct.

This all fits.

According to the IR171 history - the "87 Franz Division" were an experienced Unit. 

 

I bet they had a detachment of those two man Renault Tanks.

I think IR171 took some prisoners from that unit and this also was recorded in the 171 history.

 

keep looking !!

 

 

87e division d'infanterie (France)

 
 
Sauter à la navigationSauter à la recherche
Page d'aide sur l'homonymie Pour les articles homonymes, voir 87e division.
87e Division d'Infanterie
Création 5 avril 1917
Pays Drapeau de la France France
Branche Armée de Terre
Type Division d'Infanterie
Rôle Infanterie
Guerres Première Guerre mondiale
Batailles 1917 - Bataille de la Malmaison
1918 - 2e Bataille de la Marne
modifier Consultez la documentation du modèle

La 87e division d'infanterie est une division d'infanterie de l'armée de terre française qui a participé à la Première Guerre mondiale.

Edited by Martin Feledziak

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AOK4
6 hours ago, Martin Feledziak said:

 

Absolutely agree... And this type of research is like trying to knit with fog. BUT it is a fascinating history hunt. I am glad someone is reading my ramblings.

I am not even sure who IR171 were up against during early June 1918. I assume the French.

 

Today using my friend "Google translate" I have seen mention of their opponents being "87 Franz division" and they had tanks. ( no idea who they could be )

 

I wonder who had control of the railway line. 

ALSO

His 1919 studio portrait alludes to the award of an Iron Cross 2 - so where did he get that from ? 

It is possible that it was just costume posing.

 

In 1917 the Division were in Romania and he would have been aged 20.. So if he was to get a medal then the Longpont action would be the most probable.

 

All supposition  I know.

 

 

The French war diaries are digitised and can be found on the Memoire des Hommes website (when and if it works).

 

A lot Iron Crosses (both 2nd and 1st  Class) were handed out only after the war and some by the soldiers' councils. F.i. Erich Remarque also claimed an IC1 awarded to him by a soldiers' council. I don't know whether and how these were ever official... There didn't always have to be a good reason to receive an IC2 and it wasn't necessarily awarded only vor bravery. There were batches assigned to units every now and then and the commanders could pick to whom they gave them.

 

Jan

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Martin Feledziak
4 hours ago, AOK4 said:

Memoire des Hommes website

 

Great Jan

 

Thanks Jan, I also heard that sometime men were awarded for numerous injuries too.

 

I will investigate what I can find.

http://www.memoiredeshommes.sga.defense.gouv.fr/en/article.php?larub=78&titre=world-war-i

 

527779721_Frenchsite.jpg.30b13ee94b3ad0add7fcfd94dd613b9c.jpg

 

 

Edited by Martin Feledziak

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