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Remembered Today:

Martin Feledziak

Marcin FELEDZIAK 1897 - Infanterie Regiment 171- Meuse- Argonne 1918

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Martin Feledziak

Remebering Johan Feledziak - elder brother of Martin - killed this day 22 April 1915. At Bagatelle Pavilion during underground fighting in the Argonne Forrest.

 

Servon.jpg.625f4fdb32c21f5a3274b5dc7606ee55.jpg

 

 

Edited by Martin Feledziak

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AliceF

Martin,

 

a beautiful way to remember him.

May he rest in peace.

 

Greetings

Christine

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Martin Feledziak

Just dropping this link on so that I can find it again.

 

from this great link from Pascal Mallet

 https://www.geoportail.gouv.fr It is IGN website (Institut Géographique National) with maps of every kind (and better than Google Maps). You can use several layers with transparency. Only in French, but easy to understand.

 

This is a map which roughly indicates the location of Henry Johnson and the 369th Infantry - around mid 1918. Same sector as Johann Feledziak occupied in 1915 - and infact where he is now at rest.

 

The map is dated 1820 - 1866

 

Map.jpg.3e110eceac68c24905ed490269b1339d.jpg

Edited by Martin Feledziak

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Martin Feledziak

Barrelmayer.jpg.84524fd967259ba7cb12b8e0e50fff04.jpg

 

Verlustlisten 1. Weltkrieg, page 8820: Barrelmeyer Robert (Kolkebek, Halle)

Verlustlisten.jpg.8d3166fd321d273fc3c7ec6d1bfb86f4.jpg

 

http://des.genealogy.net/search/show/2817443

not sure what he was upto but this could be him from an incident in 1915.

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Martin Feledziak

From this publication I believe I have Karol's Austro- Hungarian history.

  • Ranklists of the Imperial and Royal Army 1918 (Vienna, 1918) 

 

Ranglisten.jpg.823b9a10440056714c1f5bac8c5bdbad.jpg

 

Galician Infantry Regiment Freiherr von Albori "No. 89 
Formed 1883 - 10th. Army Corps - 2 Infantry Division troops 

 

Nationalities: 29% Poland - 60% Ruthenians - 11% Other 
Supplementary District: Grodek-Jagiellonski 
Garrison: Stab, I., III. Baon: Jaroslaw - II Baon: Rawa Ruska (Lviv oblast / Ruthenia, Ukraine) - IV Baon: Grodek-Jagiellonski 
Commander: Colonel Joseph Mayrhofer of Grünbühel 
German Uniform - Egalisierungsfarbe: claret - Buttons: gold 

 

https://library.hungaricana.hu/en/view/RanglistenHeeres_1918/?pg=1&layout=s

Edited by Martin Feledziak

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Martin Feledziak

The below is a section of the situation as of 1898. Notable places are Budapest bottom and Krakow above top. Jaroslau is to the right, see zoom below.

 

1898.jpg.20a11cd5f846dfebfb7b60aa6695c183.jpg

 

IR 89 can be seen on the graphic at Jaroslau

 

zoom.jpg.396c7edcfd4cdb24edee191d596285ad.jpg

Edited by Martin Feledziak

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Martin Feledziak

Using my O level Geography and section from an overview Eastern front map I can see that by October 1914 IR89, and the other divisions, appear to have been in full retreat from Russian Forces and away from their pre-war station at Jaroslau.

I have over typed KRAKAU and JAROSLAU for ease of identification.

 

590edc3b74869_EasternFront2.jpg.1949df0f0ddeb183f5e4cfe5676f5a3e.jpg

Edited by Martin Feledziak

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Martin Feledziak

Page 293 from the 1918 Ranklistings- Vienna 

Kaiserlichen und Koniglichen Heeres. with notation for 89 Infanterie Regiment.

 

590efae1359dc_KarlFeledziak.jpg.b8d8ace01538f98081c6f8572059782b.jpg

 

Page 760 is the listing of the staff of that unit.

 

590efae67fe9a_KarlFeledziak2.jpg.60e81c0558a030e415869be69f5782be.jpg

 

the link to the book is here

https://library.hungaricana.hu/en/view/RanglistenHeeres_1918/?pg=0&layout=s

Edited by Martin Feledziak

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Martin Feledziak

The notation from the record above

At least 12 weeks of service with a combat unit, with service at the front

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_Troop_Cross

 

From the, not always to be trusted, Wiki site.  

MDCCCCXVI.jpg.1406224a05e11dc18343276ffff436a8.jpg

Edited by Martin Feledziak

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Martin Feledziak

Austro Hungarian Corps order of Battle 1914.

http://www.austro-hungarian-army.co.uk/orbat.htm

http://www.austro-hungarian-army.co.uk/oobgalic.htm#4tharmy

 

5911a93cdb379_10Korpskommando.jpg.64851ae7aa32b6000eb2a1d488f8495d.jpg

 

IR89 along with IR90 made up the

4th Infantry Brigade

The 4th Infantry Brigade along with The 3rd Infantry Brigade made up

2nd Infantry Division at Jaroslau

The 2nd Infantry Division along with The 24th Infantry Division made up

The 10th Corps - Przemysl.

The 10th Corps (Przemysl)  along with The 1st Corps (Krakau) and The 5th Corps (Preßburg) made up

The 1st Armee.

The 1st Armee along with The 2nd Armee, The 3rd Armee and the 4th Armee made up

     The Austraian Hungarian full Military compliment. 

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bob lembke

There was a great fortress at Przemysl. I don't recall it well, but I have a lot

of material on the fighting there. If memory serves me, the A-Hs lost it to the Russians, and the Germans came and took it back. Probably 1915-16. 

 

Let me me know if you want the details dug out. 

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Martin Feledziak

Greetings Bob,

 

I have just been reading about it and was trying to work out if IR89 were there. You are right the Russians encircled the town and took well over 100,000 troops Prisoners.

I am sure that the 24th Infantry Division must have been defending with IR 9, IR 45 and IR10 and IR77 together with all associated support units.

 

I am going to guess that the 2nd Infantry Division pulled back to the Mountains having abandoned their Garrison town of Jaroslau.

I have to admit I am just guessing as it is difficult to find good sources. 

 

I know that Karol survived WW1 so can't imagine he endured that siege and the rest of the war in some Siberian prisoner of war camp.

EDIT

I have just checked the Ranklist and he is shown present as of 1 Aug 1916 so he was not a prisoner.

Edited by Martin Feledziak

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Martin Feledziak

The below map is from May 1915 and is just before the retaking of Przemysl. I do not know what role Austro Hungarian forces played.

 

5912e0fc244cc_PrzemyslMap.jpg.62da69b62fbd59b496480be0d917ee53.jpg

Edited by Martin Feledziak

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Martin Feledziak

Not much progress looking for battle information.

There are a good many period pictures on the below link relating to the Albori family.

This interesting cap badge is from that page.

 

5922f70940925_1838-1915G.d.I.IR89FreiherrvonAlboriKappenabzeichen.jpg.ce57f8f9cf9ed125bd38f0144d8d7833.jpg

http://www.rainerregiment.at/joomla/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=70&Itemid=81

 

Rarely was a family with two well-known and outstanding military blessings like the Albori family. The Galician Infantry Regiment "Freiherr von Albori" No. 89 was named after Fieldmaster   G.G. Eugen Maria Vincenz Anton Frh. Of Albori , 1838-1915. Generalmajor Eduard Freiherr von Albori was his nephew and his adjutant during the last years of his life. 

 

n thttp://www.comroestudios.com/StanHanna/he service of the Emperor

Edited by Martin Feledziak

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Martin Feledziak

This is an image of Franz Scheffer photographic studio in Bahnhofstrasse in Gera.

I am guessing that My GF  was there having his photograph taken at the end of the war.

 

592c080225999_photographergera.jpg.1f1ecd6935eb12490ba8ed5379c9ce78.jpg

Edited by Martin Feledziak

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Martin Feledziak

Efforts to create Polish military units in France were in principle underway since the outbreak of the Great War in 1914. They were fully implemented on June 4, 1917, when French President Raymond Poincaré signed a decree on the formation of the Polish Army.

 

https://poland.pl/tourism/history-poland/100th-anniversary-founding-polish-army-france/

 

https://poland.pl/tourism/history-poland/niagara-berezyna-axis/

 

http://www.alliancecollege.com/news/100th-anniversary-wwi-hallers-polish-army-officer-training-academy-cs

 

59368114dedac_8f4e3cb4171b88fd106da148099.jpg__400x540_q85_subject_location-3234_subsampling-2_upscale.jpg.aa76d8da2ae94b0fde7c13d9c27328e0.jpg

 

 

Edited by Martin Feledziak

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Martin Feledziak

The Army consisted primarily of volunteers recruited in the United States, Canada, Brazil and Argentina. Its structure also included Poles recruited from the French army, as well as prisoners of war from the German and Austro-Hungarian armies. 

 

The below two were already prisoners of war and could logically have signed up for the new army but I am just guessing.

 

Martin FELEDZIAK 1895, 4 Kompagnie Fusilier Regiment No39 - Prisoner of War 1915

 Josef FELEDZIAK 1894 - 1970, 13 Kompanie, Reserve Infanterie Regiment No6 - Prisoner of War 1916

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Martin Feledziak
On 2017-5-9 at 14:40, bob lembke said:

There was a great fortress at Przemysl. I don't recall it well, but I have a lot

of material on the fighting there. If memory serves me, the A-Hs lost it to the Russians, and the Germans came and took it back. Probably 1915-16. 

 

Let me me know if you want the details dug out. 

 

Bob,

I have found this most excellent and comprehensive resource which appears to have all I need.  

STAN HANNA ENGLISH TRANSLATIONS just click the link below.

 

                                                                             http://www.comroestudios.com/StanHanna/

 

The below is a map from late 1914 which shows the totally surrounded Garrison at Przemysl. 

The 1st armee is just North West of Krakau (Krakow) Karol Feledziak is with IR89 which is part of the X (10th) Korps.

 

 

5943db096e49d_November1914.jpg.ffd31dcd4747db6bc863ee9dbda87ee8.jpg

Edited by Martin Feledziak

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Martin Feledziak

This is the situation for 30th September 1914.

Przemysl under complete siege. The rest of the Austro Hungarian  army is in full retreat.

the 10th Corps at Tarnow with Infantry Divisions 2 and 24.

 

5944fd73cc662_September1914.jpg.04162f962babc763ea428392fddc3fd7.jpg

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Martin Feledziak

The below is a screen grab of the web page.

                                               http://www.comroestudios.com/StanHanna/

 

it is rammed full of maps and texts.

 

 

59452f9124211_StanHANNA.jpg.1766c0be7b35b25cb02bc55bec63ff29.jpg

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Martin Feledziak

From page 18 of Volume three.

IR89 and 2ID  have moved from the 1st Army to the 4th Army.

 

5960cd568f9c0_Volumethree.jpg.c26228a08a7fccd9692f65b46b3bea5f.jpg

 

 

5960cd53326c2_September1915.jpg.4f0a941220c7947463688d11ad6f6955.jpg

 

Edited by Martin Feledziak

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Martin Feledziak

20 year old Johann was at this time, 100 years ago, severely wounded and in hospital at Stennay-Sur-Meuse. 

 

As part of the 10th reserve division, on 28th June 1917, FR37 were involved in an attack on Hill 304. 

The attack was successful but not for Johann, he appears to have suffered serious wounds.

 

Accounts below from other units of the 10th reserve

 

http://www.kaiserscross.com/40029/41518.html

http://www.kaiserscross.com/60401/60643.html

Edited by Martin Feledziak

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Martin Feledziak

Johann FELEDZIAK born 13th June 1897 died 18th July 1917.

Wounded fighting on Hill 304 on 28th June 1917 died in Military Hospital Stenay.

Has been at rest for the last 100 years at Consenvoy Cemetery France.

 

http://des.genealogy.net/search/show/6717260

 

596dc6dc226a6_FusilierFeledziak.jpg.fac446027137b7d4ef30ca1bb0e0e4f1.jpg

 

 

596dc6e3530a3_JohannFeledziak.JPG.098dd6bb4b8465053d1e6998f21aadd4.JPG

Edited by Martin Feledziak

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AliceF

May he rest in peace.

 

Christine

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bob lembke

 

On 7/11/2017 at 11:47, Martin Feledziak said:

20 year old Johann was at this time, 100 years ago, severely wounded and in hospital at Stennay-Sur-Meuse. 

 

As part of the 10th reserve division, on 28th June 1917, FR37 were involved in an attack on Hill 304. 

The attack was successful but not for Johann, he appears to have suffered serious wounds.

 

Martin;

My father was stationed in Stenay-sur-Meuse from about August 1916 till 12/28/16, when he suffered his worst 

wound and spent most of 1917 in and out of hospitals, including the hospital in Stenay, from my memory of his

letters, which I have but have not looked at in a good while. That wound was on Morte Homme (Dead Man's Hill),

in a flame-thrower (FW) attack on the French, to preempt an expected French attack. Minutes before the attack, he

had saved the life of an officer of IR 155; I have a picture of that officer in 1918, hiding the stump of his missing

right hand behind his back. The full story is interesting but too long to recount here. (Note: I see that I have in fact 

recounted much of the story.)

 

He also was wounded on Hill 304, on a pre-dawn FW raid on the French-held summit. After blowing up two batteries

of French 75s on the summit, he and others were herding back 150 prisoners. A French officer, probably half asleep,

saw the French uniforms (outnumbering the Germans herding them) and said: "Jump in the trench, I hear explosions,

the Germans must be attacking!" My father, attracted to capturing an officer, instead of killing him, said to him, in his 

excellent French: "For you, the war is over. Please give me your pistol." (Probably a small .25 caliber private pocket

pistol.) My father reached for it, and instead of handing it over, the officer fired into my father's hand from a distance 

of 1-2 inches. The pain of the muzzle blast was awful, and my father crouched over and clasped his hand between his

thighs, and his sergeant stepped forward and swung his sharpened spade and bisected the French officer's head,

passing thru his helmet and the edge stopping in the Frenchman's teeth, as he remembered. My father, bent over,

got blood and brains down his neck and down his back, which he did not enjoy.

 

War is hell.

 

My father went to the aid station, and said that he was shot, but the burn of the muzzle blast obscured the small entry

wound, and they sent him away, telling him he was not shot. Three days later the small bullet worked its way to the 

skin of the wrist, and he went back to the aid station, and pointed out that he had been shot. They took the bullet out.

 

This was one of my father's two wounds that were not severe enough to be recorded as a wound, out of his four wounds

in the war (besides contracting malaria in Turkey). That seems to be the norm, Ernst Juenger commented that he was

officially credited with seven wounds, while he counted 14 holes in himself. (Spoken from a hospital bed.) So my father's 

wound badge, which I have, is black, not silver.

 

I have a lot of info on the Morte Homme wounding, as my father had a lot of time in hospital, and wrote four long letters to

his father, gave me lots of oral history, and I even have the testimony of the officer, testifying to being wounded in at least 

two books, describing the incident and my father, while one of my father's letters from hospital included the name of the

officer, and "155", for Infantrie Regiment Nr. 155. I even have a piece of my father's upper left arm bone, blown out by the

French 75 splinter. (The ultimate collector's item.) He had the shell splinter, but a nurse in the hospital (probably where

your ancestor died) cleaned up his bedside table while he slept and threw the splinter away. 

 

I may have some information on the Stenay-sur-Meuse hospital in my father's letters, but accessing them soon is not

possible.

 

I have run on, but I hope I have given you a flavor of "fun and games" on Hill 304 and Morte Homme. 

 

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