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Badges. What era?


Roger H
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I know absolutely nothing about badges but many years ago I was given a few and they have been left in a drawer ever since. Might they be WWI era? Can anyone advise?

They are, I am assuming, MGC, KRRC, West Yorks and Anson Brigade 63rd Division (??)

Roger

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Looks to me Roger that you have a good example of of a WW1 MGC Badge there!.

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The KRRC, MGC and Anson badges look to be WW1 examples, need to see the reverse of the West Yorkshire to be sure, but probably OK if they all came from the same source.

khaki

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The Kings Royal Rifle Corps is a very Good example and genuine:-

This badge is interesting as it lists the battle honours of course:-

KRRCBadge.jpg

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Thanks everyone. I will need to decide what to do with them. I have a few more which I might dig out tomorrow and post.

Roger

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Would be nice to frame them and hang them on the wall!............... :thumbsup:

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As a collector of WW1 cap badges, without handling these examples I would say that they are genuine first world war. Ralph.

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Roger

When you photograph your other cap badges, can you also photograph the backs. There are many restrike cap badges out there and the backs of badges often give a clue as to originality. War time produced badges with sliders quite often have a line/tool mark on the slider where it was bent. Does your Anson RND Badge have a small square plaque on the back bearing a manufacturers name??

The back of the badge also clearly shows whether it was die-struck or cast, which also affects their collectability. (The ones above appear to be the more desirable die-struck badges)

I should add that I am far from an expert on badges and others may challenge me, but the backs are useful to see.

Cheers

Sepoy

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I'll post some more photos tomorrow when there is some natural light. I should add that it will be 50 yrs ago that I was given these badges when I was about 12 so perhaps before the faking era?? My brother has a huge framed set of badges that ( as the elder brother) he was given. Some of the backs on mine have got rings soldered on so that the badges could be presumably displayed. On one of the ones I will post tomorrow you can clearly see where the slider (? Is that what it is called) has snapped off and rings soldered on. Not interested in their values, just generally curious

Clearly some of the badges are of WWII vintage and one or two pre WWI

Roger

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Roger

Loops were mainly used on the rear of cap badges until around 1915 when sliders were used. A thin brass cotter pin was then used to hold the badge in place. I assume that one loop is missing on the West Yorkshire Regiment badge. RND cap badges issued in 1916 were originally issued with loops.

Sepoy

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Officially issued cap badges for the Regular Army were issued with loops from the 1890s. In 1903 the decision was to switch to long vertical shanks (sliders) and in 1906 a War Dept order shortened these for wear in the new headress. There were exceptions such as Scottish badges which remained looped as did some bagdes designed for wear in side caps. Royal Naval Division badges were one such exception and were only ever issued with loops.

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Sepoy

The West Yorks badge has got 2 loops but on top and bottom rather than left and right. You can clearly see the solder. I have the cotter pin. The Anson badge has two (original looking) loops on the left and right of the badge

Roger

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Officially issued cap badges for the Regular Army were issued with loops from the 1890s. In 1903 the decision was to switch to long vertical shanks (sliders) and in 1906 a War Dept order shortened these for wear in the new headress. There were exceptions such as Scottish badges which remained looped as did some bagdes designed for wear in side caps. Royal Naval Division badges were one such exception and were only ever issued with loops.

The KRRC design was the same for WW1 or WW2 - there is no difference as additional battlehonours were added.in the decade before WW1 and no more were added post WW1.

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I have also got a Huntingdonshire badge with a slider, which looking at the LLT site might be interesting? Photo tomorrow.

Roger

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The KRRC design was the same for WW1 or WW2 - there is no difference as additional battlehonours were added.in the decade before WW1 and no more were added post WW1.

Quite correct - as I found when I fished out my reference books this evening! The changes were the S.Africa honours added in 1905. Not sure what I was thinking of :-)

I accordingly deleted my request for a better image of the honours and then spotted your post, which has now been somewhat "orphaned".

Apologies all!

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Here are the backs of the badges I posted yesterday

Roger

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Here are some new ones. Any comments most welcome. As I said earlier, just interested because I know nothing.

Roger

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And more

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post-42671-0-31915900-1381741346_thumb.j

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Someone had a field day with the soldering iron - several of the badges do look like good originals though

Jon

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Huntingdonshire badge looks like the "wide" antlers version (as opposed to the "narrow" antlers one). Just a little bit of useful/useless information.

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