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British Bayonets Scabbards


Khaki
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While I am on a bayonet 'thrust' this morning, question for the blade experts,

With regard to the 07 pattern enfield bayonet, did the British ever experiment with a full metal scabbard?

thanks

khaki

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Not to my knowledge but the Siamese made them for their P'07s in the 1920s.

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While I am on a bayonet 'thrust' this morning, question for the blade experts,

With regard to the 07 pattern enfield bayonet, did the British ever experiment with a full metal scabbard?

thanks

khaki

khaki,

The answer is yes, in the Enfield Pattern Room there is an example of an experimental Pattern 1907 scabbard made completely of steel.

It is listed as the ' Scabbard, Sword Bayonet, Patt. 1907, Exptl ( presumably for experimental ), steel ' made by A. Cooper.

Should you find one, you will have indeed found a rare treasure.

Regards,

LF

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Siamese examples:

post-14525-0-12843400-1381368633_thumb.j

post-14525-0-78872600-1381368633_thumb.j

post-14525-0-33422700-1381368634_thumb.j

These are relatively uncommon themselves -- but the original Siamese marked leather scabbards are very scarce indeed.

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khaki,

I understand it was to do with the often wet and humid climate in Siam ( now Burma ), which had a rapid adverse effect on the leather scabbards, causing them to rot easily.

Regards,

LF

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Hello LF,

I wondered about that, as the British Army used the same scabbards for long periods in Burma and other jungle and humid locations, and as far as I know it wasn't a huge problem. I would have thought that rust on a metal scabbard would have been a problem as well.

regards

khaki

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Hello LF,

I wondered about that, as the British Army used the same scabbards for long periods in Burma and other jungle and humid locations, and as far as I know it wasn't a huge problem. I would have thought that rust on a metal scabbard would have been a problem as well.

regards

khaki

khaki,

The British Army in Burma during WW2 used a metal scabbard for ' Jungle Carbine ' bayonet. Also, I know the British were aware of the problem of ' rot ' caused by damp and humid climates, and I have in my Collection an experimental WW2 rifle sling for the No.5 rifle ( Jungle Carbine ), which had a rubberised coating applied as protection against the jungle climate.

To protect metal scabbards against rust etc., they were properly treated and painted.

Regards,

LF

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Hi Khaki,

I can't answer your original question. However, when considering the origin of a metal scabbard on a P '07 it is worth bearing in mind that the Germans issued captured P '07s with a metal scabbard. According to Anthony Carter the shape of the scabbard follows the shape of the British blade and is 445mm (17.52in) long.

Regards,

Michael H.

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  • 4 months later...

... when considering the origin of a metal scabbard on a P '07 it is worth bearing in mind that the Germans issued captured P '07s with a metal scabbard. According to Anthony Carter the shape of the scabbard follows the shape of the British blade and is 445mm (17.52in) long.

Can you point me to a reference to that? Or is it in Carter's German Bayonets Ersatz volume, the big one, and which I don't yet have...

TIA,

Trajan

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OK, found some examples... They are basically a variation of the standard Ersatz type II scabbard, the two piece sheet steel type with turned projecting edges, and a brazed frog stud of standard german type, but the scabbards are shaped to the P 1907 instead of being 'pointed'. Unlike the Siamese example, if you please, they do not have the locket and chape appendages...

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