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Çanakkale Naval Museum III


michaeldr
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These remains of this most unusual weapon are briefly labelled by the museum as:

“Five Barrelled Iron Machine Gun

19th Century Made In France Hotchkiss”

What the museum does not say is whether or not they were used in 1915

However, as Nordenfelds of a similar vintage were certainly used, then that remains a distinct possibility.

Also, see the Naval OH, Vol. II, p.161

“About two miles to the south of it [Fort Dardanos (No.8)] another battery, known to us as White Cliff, and to the Turks as Djavad Pasha (No.8E), had recently been constructed, but had not yet received its armament. Of this work we knew nothing and almost as little of the five subordinate batteries of the group, all of which had been completed since the first bombardment, and were armed with light naval quick-firing and Hotchkiss guns and field guns, in all thirty-two.”

Is this the Hotchkiss referred to here in the Naval OH?

For some technical details of this gun see the following web links

http://www.forgottenweapons.com/cannon/hotchkiss-revolving-cannon/

and

http://www.forgottenweapons.com/wp-content/uploads/Hotchkiss%20Revolving%20Cannon/Ordnance%20Memo%2027%20-%20Hotchkiss%20Revolving%20Cannon.pdf

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Hotchkiss 37mm (naval) revolving cannon were mounted to deal with fast moving torpedo boats, adopted by many countries almost certainly used in the Great War, but I am still looking for confirmation.

regards

khaki

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Hello Michael,

I have located a number of photographs of GW German gun crews manning the 37mm Hotchkiss revolving cannon (as coastal defenses) , and also the information that they (the cannon) were supplied to Turkey in several batches in the years prior to the outbreak of war .

khaki

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Khaki,

If you can post any further details, particularly about the guns sent to Turkey, then that would be most interesting

Thanks

Michael

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Khaki



Thanks for that extra detail.




There is also mention of the Hotchkiss guns in Lt-Col C C R Murphy's article on Gallipoli 1914. This first appeared in the Journal of the United Services of India, and was later included in the 1921 collection of articles by Murphy titled 'Soldiers of the Prophet'



Murphy has the following - “On August 15th [1914] a double line of contact mines was laid from Kephez to Suandere. More Mines were laid on the 19th and several Hotchkiss guns were mounted on both sides of the straits to guard the minefield.”


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