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British cemeteries-case studies request


marshalldingle
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Hi,

Apologies if this is in the wrong section- (admin bods please move it to where you see fit)

As part of my role as Education Coordinator at the CWGC I’m trying to encourage schools to investigate and explore the casualties within their local cemeteries. I am in the process of creating lesson plans and learning activities linked to the following cemeteries. These cemeteries have been chosen as a potential outreach programme pilot scheme whereby in time we will recruit volunteers who will liaise with the schools and deliver a ‘Learning Outside the Classroom Experience’ within the cemetery.

The cemeteries I aim to be including in the pilot scheme are:

Botley Oxford

Cambridge City

Cannock Chase

Cathays Cardiff

Nunhead London

Weston Mill and Ford Park Plymouth

What I am looking for is any interesting case studies, hidden gems located in these cemeteries that you may know of and would like to make available to the students. I would appreciate any stories and photos that I could include and highlight within the CWGC’s lesson activities, which would also be available on our website and freely available to schools to use. I would certainly cite yourselves as copyright owners of any documents/photos etc. I am hoping the students will understand the war and the nature of the cemeteries in more depth if they explore the person, and not just see a name on a headstone.

I have been helped and inspired on many occasions by the fabulous members of this forum for my own personal research and interests and I hope you don’t mind me asking for information for a ‘work’ related task.

Kind regards

Kate Marshall

Kate.marshall@cwgc.org

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I have photos for Oxford Botley and both Plymouth cemeteries (went two weeks ago) and Cannock Chase.

in Plymouth Ford Park I know that 2 Victoria Cross holders are in the Cemetery both didn't win them in the First World War though

Andrew Henry won his VC at the battle of Inkerman in 1854

George Hinckley won his VC at the Taiping Rebellion in 1862

also Samuel Wilson who was a Sergeant in the 64th Regiment of Foot who died in 1862.

also a memorial for a Engineer Henry Creese who sadly drowned on the Titanic

and John Neil Robertson who invented the Neil Robertson stretcher for the Navy in 1907 and is still being used today I believe

I have photos for all Five of the above but because they aren't First World War I guess I have been no help unless it was a general question then I take everything I have said back about being no help.

also In Ford Park their are a lot of young men 15,16,17 year olds buried in the cemetery.

I do have lots of photos about 70-100 altogether from all 3 cemeteries.

if it is First World War then I have to say I am quite surprised Oxford Botley was chosen of the 670 that are buried only 150 are First World War.

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Hi Dannyboy1807,

Thanks for the information, we'll be including both first and second world wars mainly, but anything else will just be an excellent bonus! The majority of schools will be concentrating on the first world war during the next four years so I am antipating to create lessons and activities with a FWW bias.

Do you know off hand, why there are alot of teenagers buried in Ford Park? naval training camp near by possibly?

thanks again you've been very helpful,

Kate

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Any particular reason why the most northerly of your cemeteries is Cannock Chase?

Bruce

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Hi Bruce,

We have selected a larger range of cemeteries for the programme, including those in the North of England, Scotland, Ireland and Northern Ireland. I am however just looking at a small selection to begin with to conduct research in the planning stages to see if this project would be feasible. Rest assured, we will be reaching each area. I am very keen for this project to succeed and grow.

Thanks,

Kate

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Kate,

I should be able to help with Nunhead, but am using iPhone at work at the moment, so will post more later.

Phil

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Excellent, thanks Phil,

Kate

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Hi Dannyboy1807,

Thanks for the information, we'll be including both first and second world wars mainly, but anything else will just be an excellent bonus! The majority of schools will be concentrating on the first world war during the next four years so I am antipating to create lessons and activities with a FWW bias.

Do you know off hand, why there are alot of teenagers buried in Ford Park? naval training camp near by possibly?

thanks again you've been very helpful,

Kate

I believe a lot of them were killed on boys training ships the main one being the HMS Impregnable sadly I would say 80% if not more died from Illness most of them from Spanish Flu. (only reason I know this was because I too were interested as to why so many young boys died)

some died on the HMS Vivid which was not a ship it was the Barracks at Devonport which is now called the HMS Drake.

and the HMS Powerful which like the Impregnable was a Boys training ship.

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excellent thanks for that, information on young casaulties always hit home to students, as they can relate to the casaulty on a personal basis.

Kate

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well if you need pictures I have lots from Ford Park.

also in Oxford Botley are two young Air Cadets buried in the cemetery Cadet G.P Balty and Cadet R.S Wallace both killed on the 25th June 1946 aged 17.

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Hello again Kate,

I'm in front of a decent keyboard at last...........

Over recent years I have researched several SE London cemeteries, including Nunhead (All Saints). Most of this originally stemmed from my researching the names on the Lewisham Military Hospital memorial (see the page on my website as the link below).

Nunhead is in some ways unique, in that it was a private cemetery. Most of the WW1 graves were of casualties from the many military hospitals in the area and Square 89 contained several hundred of these. The cemetery fell into neglect in the 1970's when the company that owned it folded up. The original Square 89 CWGC memorial was apparently vandalised to the point of destruction and many of the individual war graves in the rest of the cemetery were "lost". Last year a new CWGC memorial was dedicated and I believe there is also a programme to relocate the lost graves. Hopefully you can tell me more on that one.

I have photos of a number of the "lost" graves and some research into individuals, although this is largely on Commonwealth men due to a current controversy regarding WW1 burials there.

I will send you a quick email so that you can contact me directly regarding any specific information you may want.

Phil

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Member Aneurin http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/index.php?showuser=14917 has an interest in Cardiff casualties so may have some info on those in Cathays Cemetery if they were originally from the city (and my parents are now connected with St Teilo's Church in Cathays)

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Hi,

Thank you so much for your help and support. Within the coming weeks I will begin collating information, photos and stories.

I look forward to progressing with this project and will be contacting people off this thread, so not to clog up the forum.

kind regards,

Kate Marshall

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