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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Replica Medals


LEUZEWOOD
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Can anyone please recommend a shop offering good quality replica medals and perhaps an engraving service? Preferably purchasable online.

Just as an aside, what is the general feeling amongst forum members about buying original medals? For what it's worth it's something I don't feel entirely comfortable with.

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Hi Tom,

If it is WW1 replica medals, then 'ebay' may be as good a place as any--not sure how good the quality is, but there are lots for sale. The naming/engaving of these may not be quite so easy although Worcestershire Medal Service may perform this service, they certainly produce and sell copy WW1 medals. See their website.

You ask about buying original medals. Personally I cannot see any problem with this, provided you are not buying them with intention of wearing them in order to impersonate, or deceive, someone. I know that some feel that medals should remain within the recipients family and should never be sold on the open market. Ideally, I would agree with this sentiment, however, in the real world this will never happen simply because it is an unattainable goal--I don't think that I need to elaborate on the reasons.

Medals are purchased (I believe) by four types: 1) True Collectors; 2)Collector/Dealers; 3) Dealers and 4) Investors.

True Collectors buy because they wish to own and research the medal or medals they purchase. Profit is not a primary reason, but can be an acceptable off-spin of the hobby.

Collector/Dealers buy because they would like to collect but can't really afford to, and see the hobby as a way of making some quick 'cash on the side'.

Dealers buy in order to make a profit and see medals purely as a commodity.

Investors buy in the hope that they will eventually make a 'tidy profit' on their investment, but don't have any real interest in the medals themselves.

I suppose that the question which you need to ask yourself is: 'In which category do I wish to fall', and then I expect? that you may be able to answer your own question.

Robert

PS Another, or fifth type of buyer, would be a family member wishing to bring family medals back into the fold--and this does happen quite a lot!!

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This topic has come up many many times on various forums. It can be quite a volatile subject. I am a medals collector. Medals are my primary interest. WWI medals as we are all aware are named to the recipient. I dislike copy medals, unless marked copy. There are many named copies out on the market that IMO are made to deceive. I see no other reason for this action.

If you are looking for medals to represent a relatives service, why not purchase a representative set of originals named to another. Mount them but also note the naming, even do the research into the original recipient.

I have always found it odd that people will dispose of a relatives medals, but if they were not to sell them on, what are they to do with them?? Bin them? That to me is disrespectful to the original person. I for one am grateful to have the medals in my collection. I have researched each and every medal recipient within my collection. Where possible, I will visit their grave and pay my respects.

On the last note, I looked for hours to locate the grave marker of one of "my Men". He was awarded 14-15 Star Trio plus a DCM and MM. His grave marker was buried in the earth. Steps are now being taken to erect a new marker.

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I'll second that. I wanted a representative set of medals for my great grandfathers. For the one that was in the RAMC I purchased a set of medals belonging to another man who was in the RAMC. I have court mounted them and then framed them with a photo and cap badge. In the back of the frame is a copy of both the MIC of my great grandad and the original recipient.

Cheers

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I suspected I may have opened a small can of worms here...

My reasons for wanting a set of medals is purely personal and for entirely non commercial reasons. We still have my great grandfather's medals in the family, but much to my disappointment it has been made very clear that I will never own them - as the only member of the family to have shown any real interest in his life, researching his wartime experiences, and regularly visiting his grave and the battlefields of France, this has caused me great sadness.

If I were to own an original set of medals, I would respect and cherish them greatly, do my best to find out everything about the recipient, however I simply would not feel comfortable knowing that a family somewhere may still be looking for them, and that they may never again be on the market for them to find - hence the replica route. Dealers of course will be profiting from original medals, but at least there is some chance that they will still remain in circulation and be found.

I can understand a cynicism towards replicas, however this is the reason I posted a request for ones of 'good quality', or maybe this is an oxymoron?

Apologies for the rant, as you may have gleaned, I feel pretty passionate about this.

Regards

Tom

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Another option is renamed medals. Much cheaper, genuine and look just as good in a frame.

I have a renamed 1914 star to a DS0 winner. Cost probably 1/3 price of correctly named one to a private soldier.

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Tom

Perhaps it would help if you approached the acquisition of a genuine, correct group in another way. You could view yourself as the custodian of the medals, rather than the owner of them.

There are ways of posting the recipients details on the internet- there was a thread to that effect on this forum a while back. Any interested parties could contact you if they wished

If you did this then perhaps you would feel better knowing that you had not taken them "out of circulation"

Don't forget that many people do not share your interest in family history the Great War etc and couldn't give a fig for medals. That is one reason among many why groups are available

Justin H

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Another option is renamed medals. Much cheaper, genuine and look just as good in a frame.

Do you mean a medal which has the original recipient's name erased?

Kath.

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Another option is renamed medals. Much cheaper, genuine and look just as good in a frame.

I have a renamed 1914 star to a DS0 winner. Cost probably 1/3 price of correctly named one to a private soldier.

I would always be wary of going down this route, as such inquiries could potentially lead to the destruction of un-researchable medals named to Corps like the ASC or RA.

As mentioned above there are those who will do anything to make a buck or two.

Also a name erased, or renamed British War Medal will be of a similar value to a basic untouched British War Medal awarded to a Corps due to the silver value and potential value of the suspender.

If you want to have original medals, look out for original un-named WW1 medals. They are not common but do turn up from time to time, at a premium. Dixons Medals of Bridlington have them occasionally. This is the route I have followed, replacing missing medals in groups. I do not name these as that would effect their value and they can be easily replaced if the missing medals ever turn up.

Sepoy

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