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Hill 62 bunker photo required? Pre 1940 please!


chrislock
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Hi all.

I know there is a wonderful example somewhere on this great site concerning the famous Hill 60 bunker but no matter where I search I am unable to locate!!

I require a pre 1940 date image of the bunker especially taken from the front right, in other words as if looking towards the right view aperture if at all possible please? Thank you.

Chris

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Got some from 1937/38 somewhere Chris.

It'll take some digging out to find exactly where though (they're hard copies... I never did scan them!), so you'll have to bear with me for a few days when I can take a look (unless, of course, you manage to obtain what you're looking for in the meantime).

Dave.

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Please forgive me for my typo in the title and thank you Ian for subtly bringing this to my attention and Dave, as always you are a star and thank you also for being easy on me also doh!!

I look forward with relish and I have a feeling you already know why I need a pre WW2 image of this particular bunker.

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Chris,

I am not sure I understand how the photo looks like (taken from what side), and most of all, I have absolutely no idea what period this postcard photo is from ...

Sorry if it is not what you had in mind.

(And I have no larger resolution... :-( )

Aurel

post-92-0-40585500-1379959434_thumb.jpg

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Aurel thank you! :thumbsup:

This is just what I require if only to confirm that much of the bunker damage is WW2 vintage and not from WW1. It also confirmed my belief that many of the hill's impact craters are WW2 vintage and that the British memorial on the hill top was destroyed by artillery/mortar barrage and not by being deliberately blown up with placed explosives as some imagine.

This information has been sourced from the town's archives office which is now available to all. It also reveals the locations of British and German soldiers buried on the hill and in front of the caterpillar at the end of May 1940 and in fact, all over the place from the ridge back to Ypres. All were re-interred into the dedicated German WW2 cemetery at Lommel and local British cemeteries a year later by local people. The re-interment records reveal hard hitting yet fascinating information as Dave can also confirm.

So thank you Aurel and I look forward to seeing if Dave's image is the same one!!

If I remember correctly, Soren and Hugh also had the same beliefs! Perhaps many others did and do also?

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Hi Chris

This is from a number of photo's I have that were taken by a professional photographer, Mr. Watson from Manchester, C1938, not sure if it adds anything to Aurel's photo, although I think it is a bit more front on. There are more photo's of the Ypres area on the Dublin WFA website (added today so no captions yet) at: http://wfadublin.webs.com/

Regards

IanC

post-366-0-24721700-1379969128_thumb.jpg

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Ian, terrific image and thank you for the link also!

Both yours and Aurel's examples fit the bill perfectly and absolutely confirms the bunker damage is as a result of the May 19140 fighting.

Thank you both so much for posting these images. :thumbsup:

Best wishes to you all

Chris

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And by the way Ian, the Lille Gate bridge image is a cracker also. Many visitors are aware that the Menin Gate bridge was obliterated by the RE's in 1940 but not the Lille Gate bridge. This one was also destroyed likewise and again, the bridge in place today is definitely not the one as revealed in your link. Great pics. Thank you for bringing them to our attention.

Chris

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Hi Chris

I should have also said that in 2007 I was taken around the salient by a chap called Bernard Comyn who was born in Zillebeke and lived in the area all of his life. I believe he was quite well known in the area and certainly was on first name terms with the guys that do the ceremony at the Menin Gate. Bernard told me that the bunker was built by Australians after the Germans had been pushed back in 1918 and did not see any action in the Gt. War.

Regards

Ian

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Ian, your contact is correct in that it was built by ozzies....4th Field Coy, january 1918.....however it did "see action". used by 2nd Australian Field Battery Brigade as OP to spot SOS flares from front line and observe fire towards Zillebeke and Gheluvelt. Connected to the artillery group HQ in the existing shelters at lock 7. Taken by the Germans on 15/16 April who overcame the 13th and 24th Aus MG Coys around the hill.

Peter

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Hi Peter

Thats way beyond my knowledge, was it taken in the action you mention or did it come under fire? Unfortunately, Bernard has passed away now so I can't check with him.

Regards

Ian

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Peter,

Built by Australian troops, but the original structure was German, most part of it being below ground now. Correct ?

Aurel

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Aurel, yes indeed, Australians built over existing German construction. I have just been trying to post copy of original engineer's drawing showing this but having techy problems. The German original part is apparent in most photos.

Peter

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Why has a the earth around the front of the 'apertures' ( as in the photo in post 9) been removed to its level as it is today ?

Mick

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Mick.

My thread is all to do with confirming that the actual damage displayed on this particular bunker is from May 1940 when the hill was hit hard by German artillery and mortar fire. The QVR memorial was totally destroyed, the Australian memorial damaged with many British and German soldiers being temporarily buried on the hill itself and all around the caterpillar.

The earth removal, damage and digging activities for either burials or WW2 trench work is from that period and not from WW1 as many imagine.

Others on this site also have also seen this evidence which may be personally seen on visiting the Ypres town archives, contained in various war diaries and in the superb book "Battle of the railway line" written by Henri Braems.

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Chris, as evident from pic in post 9, which shows the wooden formwork still present and untouched, it does look as though the damage is from post WW1, probably 1940. Real double trouble.

And some people say these bits of old concrete don't have any history to tell.....

Peter

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