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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Help.....can you identify this uniform?


mackan1
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Hello

I am looking up my grandfather

Andrew Crighton Mackie
Birth 8 JUL 1899 in Ward Yett Farm, Lochwinnochnd
Death 6 JUL1985 in Ballochmyle Hospital. Macquittiston, Ochiltree

This is from the end of WWI and he is from scotland.

My guess is wwi scottish atillary (lowland)

In the photo it looks like he has a cain (guessing for horses). as my dad told me he told him he lost some horses in the war.

Is anyone able to help me out what he was in the war?

Thanks for your help.

post-102072-0-39230400-1379527903_thumb.

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Welcome to the forum mackan1,

he's definately not artillery, any chance of the rest of the photo, the cap badge which has been cropped is the most likely clue

Jon

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The bright stripes on the kilt narrow down the possible regiments quite a bit. One possibility is the MaKenzie tartan worn by 6th Bn Highland Light Infantry and all battalions of The Seaforth Highlanders except the 5th Bn. Two slightly different setts of MacKenzie were worn by these two regiments differing primarily in the placement of the red lines which would not be visible in the image. The other alternative is the Forbes tartan worn by the Liverpool Scottish.

Need a view of the headdress or at least the shoulder titles, if any, to make a better determination.

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  • 3 weeks later...

what about the stick he had on him? and the cord? does this mean anything? thought it might be something to do with horses

It's a swagger stick used to add to the soldier's smart appearance when walking out ... and allegedly to stop men slovenly stuffing hands in pockets!

Not connected with horses or any practical trade.

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Here's his entry from the Ancestry transcription of the Scotland 1901 Census ....

Name: Andrew Mackie
[user correction (looks like the same person as our OP here): Andrew Crighton Mackie]
Age: 1
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1900
Relationship: Son
Father's Name: Andrew C Mackie
Mother's Name: Jeanie Mackie
Gender: Male
Where born: Lochwinnoch, Renfrewshire
Registration number: 570
Registration District: Lochwinnoch
Civil Parish: Lochwinnoch
County: Renfrewshire
Address: Ward Yett
ED: 1
Household Schedule Number: 44
Line: 11
Roll: CSSCT1901_201

Household Members:
Name Age
Andrew C Mackie 48
Jeanie Mackie 38
Richard Mackie 7
Margaret G Mackie 5
John S Mackie 3
Andrew Mackie 1
Adam Mackie 2 Mo
Lizzie Giffin 15

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Could he be in the "Seaforth highlanders"

It's possible, but so are various other possibles - see gordon92's list in Post #7

The regiments recruiting locally to Lochwinnoch would be the Royal Scots Fusiliers (non-kilted), the HLI (only 6th Bn kilted), and the A&SH.

Note though, that there's no guarantee that he would enlist into a "local" regiment. Even more so if he was called up in the second half of the war after conscription was introduced.

This map is for general guidance only ...

post-20192-0-65491600-1381158395_thumb.j

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In looking at the original photo again, I think I can discern a single hose flash on side of the left leg. The flash also seems to have "humps" consistent with a two belled pattern. If this observation is real, and not illusory, then this soldier is a Seaforth Highlander.

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  • 6 months later...
Guest Berend

Hello,

In post 7 something is said about the difference in the placement of the red stripes on the mackenzie tartan between the seaforths and the 6th btl hli.

Can you tell me what the differences are? Or are there any pictures to show it?

Thanks in advance

Rene

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Am on my phone right now, so cannot post pictures.

Looking at the apron of the kilt:

Seaforth - A vertical single red line down the center.

HLI - A vertical red line to the inside of each of the two outside vertical white stripes.

Will post pictures this evening.

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Hello,

In post 7 something is said about the difference in the placement of the red stripes on the mackenzie tartan between the seaforths and the 6th btl hli.

Can you tell me what the differences are? Or are there any pictures to show it?

Thanks in advance

Rene

Seaforth

Seaforth0001_zps438dba3c.jpg

HLI

HLI_zpsb34c75ac.jpg

My description of the HLI pattern in my previous post was not entirely accurate.

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Out of interest would a kilted soldier have ridden horses?

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All,

I believe that the soldier in the photo is a Seaforth per Gordon92's input on the garter flash.

Below shows Pte Harry Mountain's of the 2nd on the left and a Gordon's on the right.

photo24resized2640x480.jpg

The HLI (No. 5 McKenzie) did have a different sett than the Seaforths (No' 2 McKenzie)---HOWEVER--the 6th Bn used the No. 2 same as the Seaforth's, but in a different pattern. It is made with Knife pleats.

Below is a 6th BN HLI Kilt (Pattern 8495/1915--Sept 1915) made in 1918. It was pattern sealed against No.2 McKenzie (PVCN spelling)

post-57-0-71174300-1399089709_thumb.jpg

hlilabel.jpg

This is a Seaforth's kilt made in 1916 to pattern 8048/1914 24 April 1914. Seaforth's Kilts were made with a Box pleat and was the only Regiment that had an elastic band attached to the bottom pleats. This Kilt is also set-up IAW the Standing Orders of 1 and 2 Bn Seaforth's which stipulated leather fastening tabs on each side of the Kilt. This has the same sett as the 6th HLI but is a bit more faded.

photo13a.jpg

No Kilted men were not expected ride and to wear a Kilt--Drivers and Cyclists were either allowed, trousers, pantaloons or Cyclist Knickers depending on when in the was and what they were doing.

Hope This helps,

Joe Sweeney

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Joe,

I had not realized that the 6th HLI wore the same Mackenzie as the Seaforth. Thanks for that information.

What was the purpose of the elastic band attached to the bottom pleats on Seaforth kilts?

Mike

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Mike,

I have no idea as to the intent except to guess at it keeping the pleats neat??

Joe Sweeney

Yes I agree that it would have been about keeping the pleats gathered but allowing some give during movement.

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