Jump to content
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Corporal Alfred Dominy KRRC 9TH BAT 1914-18


dominy
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello,

I was hoping somebody could steer me in the right direction re; the following

My great uncle Corporal Alfred Dominy served in the KRRC 9TH BAT during the 1914-18 War. We know that he died on 23rd March 1918 during the German Offensive (Kaiserschlacht?) somewhere around St Quentin.

I was hoping to find out;

a) Was he wounded on 21st March (as I understand that the 9th took a battering that day) and died later on 23rd

B) Is there more information as to where his battalion were on 23rd March

c) Would he have been buried locally and then transferred to St Souplet Cemetry at a later date

d) where could I go to find out more detail

thanks in advance

Andy Dominy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome to the forum Andy,

Sadly I cannot help you with the KRRC but the experts will be along soon. However I do have intrest in St. Souplet and the name Dominy. My wifes Great Grandfather (see my signature Percival Mogg) was interred in St. Souplet around 1921, he had been taken PoW on 18th March 1918 and died in a German hospital in the Sans Du Nord department on 18th july 1918, his widow made a pilgramage to the cemetery during the spring of 1922 - she was remarried the following year to Sydney Dominy. The name Dominy also features on my wifes other paternal Great Grandfathers side - their beach house at Frinton on Sea was called Dominy. Also the wifes Grandfather wrote about his expolits during WWII under the name John Dominy

I suspect that Alfred was brought to St. Souplet post Armistice so it will be worth contacting the CWGC to request an original grave location.

Jon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

22nd March 1918, from "Celer Et Audax" a record of the 9th K.R.R.C. 1914/1918

On the night of the 22nd March Major Lacey reported to the 42nd Infantry Brigade H.Q. that he had with him some 400 details which included a number of men of the 9th K.R.R.C.. He was given instructions to cover the arrival of reinforcements who were going up to occupy the line UGNY - LE GAY - CUGNY (Ugny lies midway between Peronne and Sissons and is some 12 miles west of St. Quentin)

In the event of a German breakthrough Major Lacey was to hold the CUGNY - FLAVY line.

23rd March

At 7.30am on the 23rd the postiion was again serious. The enemy had forced a crossing of the Crozat Canal between St. Simon and Jussy.

Major Lacey took up a line along the Cugny - Flavy road with his right on Flavy Railway Station. Here, he and his command made a determined and valuable resistance until obliged to fall back and conform with his flanks, on the line RIEZ - Cugny in the latre afternoon. That evening he was wounded and evacuated; a serious loss to the Battalion with whom he had been on and off with since 13/6/15.

42nd Infantry Brigade H.Q. war diary

23rd March

Very heavy mist. About 7am the enemy had forced a crossing of the canal between St. Simon and Jussy. 1 Coy, 5th Oxs & Bucks L.I. were odered to Flavy Station to reinforce the left plus Major Lacey, 9th KRRC was ordered to take up a position of the Cugny - Flavy Road. By the evening of the 23rd the remnants of the 41st, 42nd & 43rd Brigades were holding on in a line in front of Riez - Les - Cugny. The B.G.C. of the 41st Brigade was in command.

Hope this helps a little

Regarding St. Souplet, cant answer for the KRRC men in there but there are a good few Rifle Brigade men buried in there from the same period in time, hopefully the commonwealth war graves commission will be able to help you regarding his burial.

Andy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Soldiers Died in the Great War gives the cause of death for Corporal R/21496 Alfred Lewis DOMINY as "Died" rather than Killed in Action or Died Of Wounds.

This suggests maybe illness.

CGM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome to the forum Andy,

Sadly I cannot help you with the KRRC but the experts will be along soon. However I do have intrest in St. Souplet and the name Dominy. My wifes Great Grandfather (see my signature Percival Mogg) was interred in St. Souplet around 1921, he had been taken PoW on 18th March 1918 and died in a German hospital in the Sans Du Nord department on 18th july 1918, his widow made a pilgramage to the cemetery during the spring of 1922 - she was remarried the following year to Sydney Dominy. The name Dominy also features on my wifes other paternal Great Grandfathers side - their beach house at Frinton on Sea was called Dominy. Also the wifes Grandfather wrote about his expolits during WWII under the name John Dominy

I suspect that Alfred was brought to St. Souplet post Armistice so it will be worth contacting the CWGC to request an original grave location.

Jon

Welcome to the forum Andy,

Sadly I cannot help you with the KRRC but the experts will be along soon. However I do have intrest in St. Souplet and the name Dominy. My wifes Great Grandfather (see my signature Percival Mogg) was interred in St. Souplet around 1921, he had been taken PoW on 18th March 1918 and died in a German hospital in the Sans Du Nord department on 18th july 1918, his widow made a pilgramage to the cemetery during the spring of 1922 - she was remarried the following year to Sydney Dominy. The name Dominy also features on my wifes other paternal Great Grandfathers side - their beach house at Frinton on Sea was called Dominy. Also the wifes Grandfather wrote about his expolits during WWII under the name John Dominy

I suspect that Alfred was brought to St. Souplet post Armistice so it will be worth contacting the CWGC to request an original grave location.

Jon

Thanks Jon. This is all new to me so I'm finding my way but the info I've already received is fascinating. I have a location for Alfred at St Souplet. My sister lives in Calais and we plan to visit the area soon. I was after more info on his possible movements so we could visit these areas as well. I wondered where he may have been buried when he died before being moved to St Souplet.

I'm very interested in the fact that you have 'Dominys' in the family. Alfred was born in Forest Gate, East London and the family ran a chain of menswear shops. Where are your Dominys from?

a

Link to comment
Share on other sites

22nd March 1918, from "Celer Et Audax" a record of the 9th K.R.R.C. 1914/1918

On the night of the 22nd March Major Lacey reported to the 42nd Infantry Brigade H.Q. that he had with him some 400 details which included a number of men of the 9th K.R.R.C.. He was given instructions to cover the arrival of reinforcements who were going up to occupy the line UGNY - LE GAY - CUGNY (Ugny lies midway between Peronne and Sissons and is some 12 miles west of St. Quentin)

In the event of a German breakthrough Major Lacey was to hold the CUGNY - FLAVY line.

23rd March

At 7.30am on the 23rd the postiion was again serious. The enemy had forced a crossing of the Crozat Canal between St. Simon and Jussy.

Major Lacey took up a line along the Cugny - Flavy road with his right on Flavy Railway Station. Here, he and his command made a determined and valuable resistance until obliged to fall back and conform with his flanks, on the line RIEZ - Cugny in the latre afternoon. That evening he was wounded and evacuated; a serious loss to the Battalion with whom he had been on and off with since 13/6/15.

42nd Infantry Brigade H.Q. war diary

23rd March

Very heavy mist. About 7am the enemy had forced a crossing of the canal between St. Simon and Jussy. 1 Coy, 5th Oxs & Bucks L.I. were odered to Flavy Station to reinforce the left plus Major Lacey, 9th KRRC was ordered to take up a position of the Cugny - Flavy Road. By the evening of the 23rd the remnants of the 41st, 42nd & 43rd Brigades were holding on in a line in front of Riez - Les - Cugny. The B.G.C. of the 41st Brigade was in command.

Hope this helps a little

Regarding St. Souplet, cant answer for the KRRC men in there but there are a good few Rifle Brigade men buried in there from the same period in time, hopefully the commonwealth war graves commission will be able to help you regarding his burial.

Andy

Thanks, Andy. This is great info as we plan to visit soon. I have a reference for his grave at St Souplet. And thanks for posting the jpg of the reports - very interesting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Soldiers Died in the Great War gives the cause of death for Corporal R/21496 Alfred Lewis DOMINY as "Died" rather than Killed in Action or Died Of Wounds.

This suggests maybe illness.

CGM

Thank for the info. Was this fairly typical? Was illness a big problem during the war? You'll have to forgive me as I'm new to this and my questions may appear naive at times! And where do you all get this info from?

a

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dominy,

The area is a good one to look over and away from the usual crowds. The only problem is that as CGM has pointed out he is listed as died rather than killed in action, so we do not know exactly what happened regarding the circumstances of his death although the 14th Division were having a reasonably torrid time having recently taken over trenches from the French which are described as being in a disgusting state. The defence scheme was not fully in place and so on.

I have not looked to see if his record survives which would shed considerably more light on matters.

Andy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

He is under Alfred Doming MIC shows victory and war medals medal roll M/1013/28 pge3543

Thanks Gem. Is this info generally available? And this would not be the first time this has happened in the family - my first day at school I was wrongly admitted as Doming which was a pain for weeks!

a

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dominy,

The area is a good one to look over and away from the usual crowds. The only problem is that as CGM has pointed out he is listed as died rather than killed in action, so we do not know exactly what happened regarding the circumstances of his death although the 14th Division were having a reasonably torrid time having recently taken over trenches from the French which are described as being in a disgusting state. The defence scheme was not in place and so on.

I have not looked to see if his record survives which would shed considerably more light on matters.

Andy

I've read a few reports about 21st March 1918 and it seems the 9th Battalion KRRC were all but wiped out by the end of that day along with the 8th Bn KRRC. It is sombre reading indeed. You mention 'if his record survives'. If it did where would I find it?

a

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If his record survives it would be on Ancestry.com, with regard to the medal rolls they are held at Kew (National Archives)

The whole 14th Division suffered pretty badly with its commander Vic Couper being one of those relieved, 9th and 7th Rifle Brigade suffered badly by the Crozat Canal on the crossing mentioned earlier and the actions are sometimes difficult to follow accurately during this time, as companies from different battalions were sent here, there and everywhere as mentioned in the Brigade war diary, with 1 Company of the Oxs & Bucks sent up to Flavy to protect the left.

Andy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It appears that there is no will for him. Maybe his records are among those that were destroyed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dominy,

I have the war diaries for 9 KRRC and could PM the relevant pages if you are interested.

Peter B

Edited: Perhaps you have to PM me with your email address and I send you the docs. (I'm still a learner)

Edited by old sparky
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oops looks like you are correct MBrockway therefore i have deleted the post and i shall try not to infringe this rule again

thanks for pointing it out

Graham

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Andy, our Dominys' are from Weymouth, possibly a distant relative.

Percival was taken prisoner on 23rd March, his PoW card from Limberg dated 26th June 1918 notes him as being fit and well, yet less than a month later his was dead, SDGW noting this as 'Died', according to family lore he was never at Limberg and his death was more sinister than illness, a document that I recieved from the International Commitee of the Red Cross supports the family lore - I wont go into detail here but it may also be worth contacting the ICRC regarding their PoW records as it may be possible that your great uncle was taken prisoner also,

Jon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oops looks like you are correct MBrockway therefore i have deleted the post and i shall try not to infringe this rule again

thanks for pointing it out

Graham

I usually transcribe the key info into a GWF post for general consumption and mail the image to the relative.

Cheers,

Mark

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Andy, our Dominys' are from Weymouth, possibly a distant relative.

Percival was taken prisoner on 23rd March, his PoW card from Limberg dated 26th June 1918 notes him as being fit and well, yet less than a month later his was dead, SDGW noting this as 'Died', according to family lore he was never at Limberg and his death was more sinister than illness, a document that I recieved from the International Commitee of the Red Cross supports the family lore - I wont go into detail here but it may also be worth contacting the ICRC regarding their PoW records as it may be possible that your great uncle was taken prisoner also,

Jon

Thanks, Jon. I'm pretty sure the family may well have Dorset connections - I'll ask around and let you know!

a

The info I've received has been terrific. The family are all intrigued - so many thanks.

How would i find out when Alfred enlisted? Then I could trace his movements throughout his time serving

thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oops looks like you are correct MBrockway therefore i have deleted the post and i shall try not to infringe this rule again

thanks for pointing it out

Graham

Hi Graham,

I found this link to Alfred's Medal Card

http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/image/Index/D2653585?index=1&page=0

And it appears that there is another page of info which I didn't see from your link?

Although it is distorted there does seem to be more info......

Could you shed light or would it be simpler for me to order the PDF as shown?

Thanks in advance

a

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Graham,

I found this link to Alfred's Medal Card

http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/SearchUI/image/Index/D2653585?index=1&page=0

And it appears that there is another page of info which I didn't see from your link?

Although it is distorted there does seem to be more info......

Could you shed light or would it be simpler for me to order the PDF as shown?

Thanks in advance

a

The National Archive downloads are in blocks of six MICs (obverses only).

The MICs on Ancestry are the obverse and reverse of a single MIC. You in fact get more info via Ancestry than TNA.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...