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1914 christmas tin


goldmax 007
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hi i have been given this by a friend to sell he has no idea of its worth so i am not going to take advantage of this and hope someone on here can give me a rough estimate of vaule it was his great grandads the tobacco is still sealed but the cigs are open but but all there the pipe is also unused the story his dad told him was that his great grandad sent it home during ww1 to his parents as he was not a smoker any help i can pass on to him

regards

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Queen Marys 1914 Christmas Tin

In November 1914, an advertisement was placed in the national press inviting monetary contributions to a "Sailors & Soldiers Christmas Fund" which had been created by Princess Mary, the 17 year old daughter of King George V and Queen Mary. The fund's purpose was to provide everyone who would be wearing the King's uniform on Christmas Day 1914 with a "gift from the nation". The response was overwhelming, and it was decided to spend the money on an embossed brass box, based on a design by Messrs Adshead and Ramsey. Contents varied considerably; officers and men on active service afloat or at the front were to receive a combination of pipe, lighter, 1 oz of tobacco and twenty cigarettes in distinctive yellow monogrammed wrappers. Non-smokers and boys received a bullet pencil and a packet of sweets instead. Indian troops often got sweets and spices, and nurses were treated to chocolates. Once the standard issue of tobacco or sweets was in the tin there was little room for much else, apart from the Christmas card and picture of Princess Mary. Those not distributed until after Christmas were sent out with similar contents, but a card wishing the recipient a "Victorious New Year". The wounded, nurses, and the widows or parents of those killed were also entitled to the gift. Prisoners of war had theirs reserved until they returned home.

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I got one on EBay last year for 28 pounds, minus the pipe, cigarettes or tobaco, but including the picture.

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Unfortunately "you're" not going to make a fortune as 1914 tins(boxes) are commonplace on a well-known Internet selling marketplace or in local Antique Shops.

The original contents may bring a higher price but for a general estimate check E-B..

I appreciate,of course,that the price may rise, next year, for a semi-untouched "original".

e.g.I have inherited an "emptied original" Box,i.e."enjoyed at the time", apart from the Christmas Card and photo,which now contains the trio,of the casualty recipient,placed in the Box when originally received,I assume.The Medals would attract a greater price than the Box should I ever choose to sell them . :(

George

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A good tin with original gilding - Up to £55. Pack of cigarettes (even incomplete) £20 - £30 Unopened Pipe tobacco £30-£40. Pipe £100.00

In the ball park of £ 200.00. If you had the bullet pencil and card add £80.

A good complete set will set you back £250 -£300 without the pipe these days. In 15 month time - who knows?

John

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thankyou for all the infomation he has the card and a little photo but both are damaged i will make him an offer to see what he says after showing him the above posts and will i hope be adding it to my collection

thanks one and all for your help

warren

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John,

I agree with your estimate. The last pipe sold on ebay made £120 with good attribution to the original owner and his tin.

Mark

A good tin with original gilding - Up to £55. Pack of cigarettes (even incomplete) £20 - £30 Unopened Pipe tobacco £30-£40. Pipe £100.00

In the ball park of £ 200.00. If you had the bullet pencil and card add £80.

A good complete set will set you back £250 -£300 without the pipe these days. In 15 month time - who knows?

John

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Don't for get the last PM lighter I saw sell on ebay. £325 !

I bought a full tin about 4 years ago for £100. You never see that now.

Also militaria traders are often cheaper than the normal antiques traders for PM tins.

John

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How can one tell if a pipe is a PM pipe-does it have the crest? Picture looks to have been taken a year ago-(tried to enlarge the pipe marking) regards, Paul.

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took the picture yesterday it has 4 markinggs on it

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Paul,

The short answer is that you can't as they were sourced commercially from a number of manufacturers and although you can never say 'never' I am not aware that any pipe had the monogram which is why direct attribution is critical in establishing a 'gift' pipe.

regards

Mark

How can one tell if a pipe is a PM pipe-does it have the crest? Picture looks to have been taken a year ago-(tried to enlarge the pipe marking) regards, Paul.

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Thanks Mark. Are there known records relating to manufacturers of pipes or style/type?

Warren-sorry if I'm mistaken over picture date.I know little of digital cameras and the workings of windows 8 but when I copied the picture and cropped and enlarged the pipe to look at the markings, I went to find the picture and could not find it in date order. Found it in the end listed as 06-08-12. If anyone can explain that I would love to know how these things work! Anyway back to the subject- I take it the marks on the pipe are not silver hall marks? Regards, Paul.

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the top mark in the diamond shape reads EP then the marks below are in old english type lettering and i think is u.g.u maybe

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Here are the markings on my pipe. The receipient was Royal Navy. its is also marked 'E.P' in a diamond.

regards

Mark

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I really resent this discussion apart from the Original Posters request for what he should fairly pay for a semi-intact "Mary Box".

I feel you all miss the point of the original purpose of the Box

It was meant to be a 1914 Christmas treat,enjoyed and nothing more .

To now, have "surviving" original contents,to my mind, defeats it's original purpose..

E.g.would a non-smoker exchange his smoking treat with a smoker for his Boxes sweets?

George

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I really resent this discussion apart from the Original Posters request for what he should fairly pay for a semi-intact "Mary Box".

I feel you all miss the point of the original purpose of the Box

It was meant to be a 1914 Christmas treat,enjoyed and nothing more .

To now, have "surviving" original contents,to my mind, defeats it's original purpose.

George

I think you are being rather harsh. I love the sentimental history, the magic of the boxes and their history. Discussing the real situation 99 years later does not divorce people from the original purpose.

John

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Interesting point but the fact my contacts great grandad sent it home as he was not a smoker is why some of its contents are still intact and i am sure it was a topic of conversation for his family over the past years its only now that the younger generation of his family are not interested and would instead sell it to no doubt by xbox games or something its surly better off with my collection to be enjoyed and given the respect and honor both the tin and its original soldier deserve also allowing me to show to others what the 1914 tin had inside or should i tell him to chuck the contents away and buy the tin for £20 like all the others empties out there for sale I think not

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Deus,

I do not dispute that the Family wish to get rid of the Box and you,in view,of its original contents wish to pay them a fair price..

I could argue,quite reasonably,as the Family have no idea of its worth you offer them £20. They may be pleased to receive that amount for an unwanted item of their heritage and you can add an "expensive" Box to your collection for minimal outlay. :D

Many WW1 Museums have "complete" Boxes, on display, which I am sure have been better conserved and will be for posterity than one that has been kept by a Family for 100 years and now handed on to you.

The first time I visited Vimy Ridge(1999) the visitor centre had, on display, a Box that had been recovered from the battlefield.Its tattered remains,spoke greater volumes to me than my possessing a complete original.

George

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should i tell him to chuck the contents away and buy the tin for £20 like all the others empties out there for sale I think not

Oh dear!

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Given the original recipient chose not to consume the contents of his tin, and presumably sent it / took it home to keep as a souvenir, I'm sure he would prefer that it is kept that way in perpetuity, ideally within his family, I'm sure, but failing that to be appreciated in a personal collection is probably the next best thing.

IMHO

James

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  • 5 months later...

A friend has a box (no contents I'm afraid) which she believes was received by her father. However, in Dec 1914 he was a raw recruit in a Kitchener battalion. Would he have received one of these boxes - or is the family heirloom more likely to have been received by my friend's uncle who was in France with the BEF?

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Acording to Howard Williamson research a total of 2,601,089 Tins was issued. I have 2 compleat sets including teh tinder lighter , as stated rare to come across, now its 2014 it will be even more exspensive to purchase .

Dan

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Phil,

My grandfather enlisted on 2nd September, and was in training in the UK when he received his tin. I think the intention was to get one to everyone in uniform.

Regarding earlier comments, many recipients, both on active service and at home, kept their Princess Mary tins intact as a unique souvenir.

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How can one tell if a pipe is a PM pipe-does it have the crest? Picture looks to have been taken a year ago-(tried to enlarge the pipe marking) regards, Paul.

Good Morning Everyone......

A friend of mine has done a big study over the last 20 or 25 years and has written several monologues on the tins and their contents..... There were several different contents for the tins, the Smoking Packages, A Writing Kit, A Sewing Kit, Hard Candy and Spice Kit (for Indian Troops) and others that he has been able to identify and catalogue...... He has 2 of the pipes that I have seen and they are both marked with the Princess Mary cypher......

Mike

P.S. He even has one made from Sterling Silver that was from a group special made for the Indian Princes.....

Edited by QSAMIKE
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