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dsquared

WWI Regimental Codes G6917 & L9226?

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dsquared

Could someone please point me in the right direction as to where I can look up (online) the official names of these Regiments from WWI?

Should be from Surrey area of England prior to 1915. Can't find anywhere.

Thanks for your time.

DD

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Ron Clifton

Hello DD

Where do these references come from? Soldiers' regimental numbers are often prefixed with a letter, and G for enlistment for general service and L for either an enlistment in a locally-raised ("Pals") unit or, sometimes, an enlistment in London, are both common.

In either case, you woulkd not be able to identify the regiment, because each had its own numbering system. There was not, as there was after 1921, a batch of army-wide numbers allocated to each regiment and corps.

Ron

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Chris Ludlam

Hi

If these are regimental nos.

I found two names for G/6917 may be more

Pte Arthur C Wikenden Royal West Kent Regiment

Pte Frederick G Holman The Queens Regiment

One for L/9226

2 MIC cards

Pte Sidney J S Britton or J S Sidney - (2 names on one card) - 1st East Surrey Regiment

France - 16/8/14

Discharged 20/5/16

Has a SWB

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Ron Clifton

Givenm that the Queens Regiment has the subsidiary title (West Surrey) all three names look feasible. Presumably DD has the right names anyway?

Ron

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dsquared

Thank you for your responses.

Fred is one of the brothers I am researching. Have since tracked down and purchased their record cards (George's L9226) and both say Queens R. Regiment. I don't understand these codes. They mean the same regiment? Soldiers in the BEF do not have their own individual number - is that correct? These codes are on their record cards in the Regiment column.

Family trees on Ancestry give date of death for Fred (which I, cannot find) as the same day as the one brother, George which is listed on his medal card as 22 Aug 1915. So it may be the case that they were in the same regiment and died in same battle??? Family trees say one was Picardie the other just the Somme.

Also confusing - one got the 1914 Star and Clasp and the other only the Victory and George Medals? No initial start dates recorded for him.

What does "Clasp issued 1/834" mean?

Also, do you think it safe to assume that if I cannot find a grave for one that he most probably is burried in the same cemetery as his brother in a "known unto God" plot if there was a body, if not shouldn't there be a memorial with his name on it there?

Thanks for your time. I appreciate your expertise.

DD

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Colin W Taylor

DD

It may be worth looking at this page on interpreting A medal index card.

George Holman was killed on 22/8/1915 whilst serving with 1st Battalion the Queens Regiment; his service number was L9226. The reference to the clasp is the list on which he will be shown to be entitled to it - if memory serves soldiers who were involved in combat and who were entitled to the 1914 Star were entitled to it - his MIC states he was in France from October 1914. His MIC also mnetions he served in the 2nd Battalion of that regiment and as they arrived in France on the date he did he was presumably transferred to the 1st Battalion between then and his death.

His brother G6917 Private Frederick G Holman was not entitled to either the 1914 or 1914-1915 Star and therefore didn't serve abroad before 1916; there seems to be no trace on www.cwgc.org of a reference to him; unlike his brother. In fact I think he was discharged in 1917 due to sickness - there is a soldier of his name but with a slightly different service number (G2917 - a typo I think) in the Silver Wound Badge records on Ancestry. http://interactive.ancestry.co.uk/2456/wo329_3040-00097/239387?backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.co.uk%2fcgi-bin%2fsse.dll%3findiv%3d1%26db%3dSilverWarBadgeMedals%26rank%3d1%26new%3d1%26MSAV%3d1%26msT%3d1%26gss%3dangs-d%26gsfn%3dfrederick%2bg%26gsln%3dholman%26_F000678D%3dqueens%2bregiment%26dbOnly%3d_F000678D%257c_F000678D_x%252c_F8006879%257c_F8006879_x%26uidh%3d616%26pcat%3d39%26fh%3d4%26h%3d239387%26recoff%3d&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnRecord

I hope this is of assistance.

Kind regards

Colin

I would suggest getting in touch with the author of the family tree to find out what exact information there is on the two of them.

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dsquared

Thank you so much Colin. You can see all that from the Medal Card?

Thanks for your advice.

DD

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ss002d6252
Soldiers in the BEF do not have their own individual number - is that correct

During the period of 1914-1918 , in most cases, each regiment dealt with their own numbering (there are always some exceptions).

The regular battalions within each regiment tended to share the same batch of numbers so number 1000 could join the 1st Bn and the next man could join the 2nd Bn and would be numbered 1001.

Each regiment also, usually, had a number of Territorial Bns - each of these had their own individual sequence so you could have a number 1000 in the 4th T.F. Bn and a number 1000 in the 5th T.F. Bn. The number would normally be prefixed by the Bn number so that you had a man numbered 4/1000 and man numbered 5/1000.

Each regiment had a similar pattern so at anyone time across the army there would be numerous men with the 'same number'.

It was not until after WW1 that the concept of an individual, army wide, service number was introduced.

During the war the massive expansion of the army led to many changes in the way that men were numbered and led to things such as giving different groups of recruits within a regiment numbers based on how they were recruited e.g. G/ for war time enlistment. To confuse the issue there were numerous different numbering patterns introduced - and then there was the 1917 renumbering of the territorials....

Craig

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