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thel

175th Tunnelling Company Diary

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thel

What does the diary say was happening for the 175 during the period 24th August and 2 September 1916? My great uncle was seconded to the 175th and one week later was admitted to hospital with "w. cont. shell shock".

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sotonmate

Thel

I may be able to look next week,subject to availability. WO95/404.

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sotonmate

Thel

I have some pics from the War Diary and need an e-mail by PM here to send them on. The journal is pretty thin on activity but there is an illuminating report around the time you need concerning gas casualties in the tunnels,mentions of shelling and of Infantry draft to secure the area,and a small overlay map of the "diggings". A July page shows they were in the vicinity of CAMBUGNEUL (Map Sheet 36B W15 c 3.7) and has no other places since then so we could take it they they dug there for the long haul.

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Simon_Fielding

Do your extracts cover anywhere near end August / beginning September 1918 soton?

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sotonmate

Simon

Lucky I saw this ! No flag-up activated.

My notebook says that I have material only for the specific period 24 Aug to 2 Sep 1916,required by Thel. As it happens Thel didn't reply to my request for an e-mail address and my notebook also shows that nothing was sent !

Sorry I can't help.

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Simon_Fielding

No problem! Thanks anyways!

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Barbara Rodger

My uncle David Rodger (born about 1896, Shotts, Lanarkshire, was killed in France in the last month of the Great War, ie 13 October 1918.    I should be much obliged if you are able to advise whether he is in the photo shown of the 175th Tunnelling Company.   He is known to have been in this Regiment.   Was he part of the group who built bridges over the Ancre in the advance on the Somme in Autumn 1918?

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Michelle Young

Welcome to the forum Barbara. I can't help with the group photo, but I should be able to take a photo of his grave for you in April.

Michelle 

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MaxD

Sotonmate may well see this and be able to check the diary for you.  Certainly the potted history on Longlongtrail mentions the bridges. Formed at Terdeghem in April 1915, and moved soon after into the Railway Wood-Hooge-Armagh Wood area of the Ypres Salient. Extended to the Hill 60 in July 1915. Relieved in May 1916 by the 1st Australian Tunneling Company. Moved briefly to Spanbroekmolen in April 1916. Destroyed the entrance inclines to Hermies catacombs in March 1918, as the enemy advanced from Cambrai. Built bridges over the Ancre in the British advanced on the Somme in Autumn 1918.

 

Looking at his Commonwealth War Graves entry :https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/572410/rodger,-david/ scrolling down you will see a concentration sheet.  This shows that he was one of three men of the company killed on the same day and who were initially buried in the existing German Cemetery at Selvigny.  This is about 6 miles to the west of the cemetery to which they were brought after the war.

The cemetery can bee seen on the trench map here:

 

https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/side-by-side/#zoom=15&lat=50.0793&lon=3.3454&layers=101465128&right=BingHyb

 

 

Max

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Barbara Rodger
On 19/02/2020 at 19:53, Michelle Young said:

Welcome to the forum Barbara. I can't help with the group photo, but I should be able to take a photo of his grave for you in April.

Michelle 

Many thanks Michelle for your kind offer.   However I do have a photo of David's grave at Honnechy.   Not sure whether he was killed near there, as it apparently used to be a German cemetery.  It seems there were so many battles nearby.  

Barbara

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Barbara Rodger
On 20/02/2020 at 04:28, MaxD said:

Sotonmate may well see this and be able to check the diary for you.  Certainly the potted history on Longlongtrail mentions the bridges. Formed at Terdeghem in April 1915, and moved soon after into the Railway Wood-Hooge-Armagh Wood area of the Ypres Salient. Extended to the Hill 60 in July 1915. Relieved in May 1916 by the 1st Australian Tunneling Company. Moved briefly to Spanbroekmolen in April 1916. Destroyed the entrance inclines to Hermies catacombs in March 1918, as the enemy advanced from Cambrai. Built bridges over the Ancre in the British advanced on the Somme in Autumn 1918.

 

Looking at his Commonwealth War Graves entry :https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/572410/rodger,-david/ scrolling down you will see a concentration sheet.  This shows that he was one of three men of the company killed on the same day and who were initially buried in the existing German Cemetery at Selvigny.  This is about 6 miles to the west of the cemetery to which they were brought after the war.

The cemetery can bee seen on the trench map here:

 

https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/side-by-side/#zoom=15&lat=50.0793&lon=3.3454&layers=101465128&right=BingHyb

 

 

Max

Thanks so much Max..   your very helpful information is appreciated, as I didn't realise that David had been moved from Selvigny to Honnechy.   My great niece (from NZ) visited his stone in Honnechy about 3 years ago, and will be interested in these details.  I have copied David's information which is given on the websites you have suggested.  

 

 

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Barbara Rodger
14 hours ago, MaxD said:

The Honnechy Cemetery details explain about its previous use:

 

https://www.cwgc.org/find-a-cemetery/cemetery/63203/honnechy-british-cemetery/   (scroll down the page)

 

Max

 

14 hours ago, MaxD said:

 

 

 

After studying the History information on the various cemeteries in the Le Cateau area, it is amazing that so many soldiers' details were eventually able to be found.       

What an impressive website - very pleased that so much is able to be discovered.   

Thank you for suggesting Sotonmate in regard to a possible diary record for 13 October 1918  - will now pursue this.  

Kind regards,   Barbara

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