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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Ivy Pretoria May Hibberd 218894


Lady Linda
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Hi,

Can anyone tell me a bit more about this young lady.

We were out taking war graves again today for Mick at BWG and we came across this young lady at Wylye St Mary's.

Hubbie didn't know they had WRAF in WW1. Anyone know what she did and how she died?

Many thanks

Linda

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Thanks for that Sue.

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Thanks too for that Ian.

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I have a particular interest in her as I have her memorial plaque. Her death certificate shows that she died of influenza/pneumonia on the 6th November 1918 - just three weeks after enlisting.

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Thank you for that. I noticed she died shortly after enlisting. I am always curious about certain people after taking a gravestone.

best wishes

Linda

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  • 7 years later...

I know these comments were a very long time ago but Ivy Hibberd was my Grandmother's elder sister. She was, in fact, just 17, not 19 when she died, she was born in 1901. I would like to know more about her but cannot seem to find any more details. 

 

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On 27/06/2013 at 17:23, Sue Light said:

She has a service record here - they are often very brief, but might give further information about her death:

Ivy HIbberd

Sue

This link from the National Archives is her service record (4 Pages). You will need to register for an account. Currently downloads are free.

 

Tim

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3 hours ago, Roxanne said:

I know these comments were a very long time ago but Ivy Hibberd was my Grandmother's elder sister. She was, in fact, just 17, not 19 when she died, she was born in 1901. I would like to know more about her but cannot seem to find any more details. 

 

 

Her birth was registered in the second quarter 1900 in the Wilton registration district. She died 6th November 1918. That makes her aged 18.

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Yes, my apologies, I don't know where I got 1901 from but she was born in 1900, however the gravestone states she was 19 when in fact she must have been 18 when she died - in 1918, a minor detail I realise. We think she must have died from the flu. She could only have served for a few weeks before her death. Does anyone know what job she signed up for? Also, Jim Strawbridge, do forgive me but what is her 'memorial plaque'??

Edited by Roxanne
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Hello Jim Strawbridge, by her 'memorial plaque' do you mean her 'big brass penny' as we called it when I was a little girl. I lived with my Grandparents (Ivy's Sister) & it was always standing on the mantle piece above the fire. It was polished every Sunday morning along with all the brass by my Grandfather, which I attempted to help with being just a small child. If that is what you refer to would you please, please sell it to me as it has enormous sentimental value to me. You cannot imagine what it would mean to me. Please reply, thankyou. 

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1 hour ago, Roxanne said:

Hello Jim Strawbridge, by her 'memorial plaque' do you mean her 'big brass penny' as we called it when I was a little girl. I lived with my Grandparents (Ivy's Sister) & it was always standing on the mantle piece above the fire. It was polished every Sunday morning along with all the brass by my Grandfather, which I attempted to help with being just a small child. If that is what you refer to would you please, please sell it to me as it has enormous sentimental value to me. You cannot imagine what it would mean to me. Please reply, thankyou. 

 

Officially called a memorial plaque it was often called a "death penny" early on by the families that received them. The memorial plaque bears an important part of my research and is not for sale but I am happy to put your name and address with it for when I am ready to let it go. Be aware that female memorial plaque are perhaps rarer than Victoria Crosses and consequently command a high price when they come on the market. When Ivy signed up with the WRAF she, herself, stated that she was 19 years old and signed the application. Therefore the WRAF thought of her as aged 19 and why the CWGC has used it. It was not unusual for both men and women to fib about their age to get into the armed forces. She was employed for general household work. All three services took women onto the strength for employment for household duties, as cooks or office work. Rather than employ local civilians it was preferable for this work to be undertaken by women signed up and subject to War Office rules and regulations. 

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Hello Jim, that's very upsetting that it cannot be returned to her family but I understand your research. I would very, very much appreciate you keeping my name in the hope that it may eventually come back to me. Can I ask where you got it? I know they were referred to as the 'dead man's penny' but only found that out as I grew older, as I said, we rather more politely called it the big brass penny. Can I ask that you give me a call sometime to discuss this & I can give you my address. (01985 300833) I look forward to speaking to you in person. Thank you.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Dear Jim Strawbridge, thank you for the bits of information you gave on Ivy Hibberd. Could you please tell me where you got Ivy plaque? I had believed my Uncle had it when my Grandmother died but it seems he didn't. This only came to light recently when I asked my Cousin (his Son) if I might have it. He said they had never seen it. I would therefore suggest that whoever sold it didn't actually own it so I would like it eventually returned to the family after all these years. Thank you in anticipation for your reply. 

Edited by Roxanne
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Roxanne, One hundred years have passed since it was issued and it is likely to have passed through many hands. I would suggest that someone in the family had it and sold it or it was disposed of as part of their estate. I have offered to put your name and address with it so that you get first chance of having it when I dispose of it. I am not going to enter into any further correspondance on this matter. Jim

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