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Remembered Today:

25th Field Bakery Italy 1919


vanessaharrell

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I am researching Ernest Reason S/24139 RASC who was in the 25th Field Bakery in Italy in 1919. He died on 14th January 1919 in a tragic accident, caused by his clothing getting caught in the machinery whilst on duty. I have a letter written by a Capt. Morrison T.D to his brother describing what happened to him. His war record does not appear to have survived, and his medal card just says 3/F BKY ASC. He is buried in Monteccio Maggiore Cemetery. I am finding it very difficult to find out about his war history and would be very grateful if anyone could give me some advice.

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I have tried to provide a War Diary reference for this Bakery,but all I am getting in the NA Discovery database is the 25 FB for WW2 in Italy ! If you can source it you should get some info on the incident,should be in the WO95 series.

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  • 5 years later...

Hi Vanessa,

 

i have been referred to your thread from someone whose grandfather also served in the 25th Field Bakery in Italy. I have been researching the bakeries across the globe for the past 4 years. My great grandfather won the DCM and was in the Bakeries in Northern France. I can concur that the diaries that have survived are few and far between. I have however ploughed through many original documents, trade papers, service records and many documents from the National Archives WO95 series and built up an extensive data base of bakers and information on how the bakeries operated. I have a small amount of information on Italy. It is buried somewhere in thousands of pages of research but I will see what I can look out. I would love to know more about Ernest Reason, I will of course add him to my data base. If you would be willing to share the information regarding his accident and death that would be wonderful.

Putting together what happened in the Bakeries has been like putting together a giant jigsaw without a picture. Each jigsaw piece buried in amongst thousands of pages.

i hope to hear from you.

 

kind regards

 

janet

 

 

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Janet

 

Can you say who give your grandfather's name, his DCM citation might add something to this.

 

TR

Edited by Terry_Reeves
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Hi Terry my great grandfather was SSgt Thomas Martin. It was discovering his service record that my interest was piqued. In trying to discover more about why and how he could have won the DCM I spoke to William Spencer at the National Archives. It was with his encouragement that I embarked upon my research. I have spent the last 5 years looking at all available material at the Royal Logistics, ploughed my way through as many diaries and documents I could find at the National Archives, read all the trade papers I could find at the National Master Bakers Association and at the British Library as well as thousands of service records for soldiers employed within the Bakeries. I have also found a number of contemporaneous books which have helped to shed light on the Bakeries. The greatest difficulty is there are very few narratives and it has been a matter of trying to find odd snippets in amongst the thousands of pages I have found and then to pull them together. It is a fascinating story. It truly reflects the war in that it is a global story, wheat, bread’s main ingredient being sourced around the globe. It is also, possibly a unique story where what was happening on the Frontline was impacting the Home Front and vis versa. Food was used as a weapon and bread, which formed the vast majority of calories for both the troops and the common people at home, was of vital importance. The supply of this basic foodstuff was a constant issue and arguably had an enormous influence on the direction of the war. 

I am hoping that if Vanessa is willing to share her letter I may be able to pull together some of the information I have which may shed some light on where Ernest was serving.

 

Does this help?

 

janet 

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