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Remembered Today:

Update from the British Memorial Association, Fromelles


Victoria Burbidge

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Please find below an update regarding the current situation in Fromelles. I’ve also included a few little gems for those of you who are not quite so familiar with the background history. I know that many of you have heard rumours and have also been in receipt of some of the same emails which have found their way into my Inbox, but I’m hoping that the following will help to clarify things.

V.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


From the outset, our Association’s mission statement has been:


  • to work, both independently and in conjunction with other organisations, to educate with regard to the British involvement in and around Fromelles during the Great War;
  • to ensure that sufficient funding is made available for any Fromelles-based commemorative service and related exhibition which the Association may organise; and
  • subject to approval being given by the local Commune de Fromelles, to fund and inaugurate, somewhere within the vicinity of the old battlefield at Rouge-Bancs, Fromelles, a memorial to the men of the British Army who fought there during the Great War.

Many of you will know of my long-held concerns for the commemoration of our men, the attitude of both the local Fromellois and the Australians towards the families of these British men and the apparent “air-brushing” from Fromelles’ Great War history of four years’ of British sacrifice. Those concerns seem to have been well-founded.

With regard to the Memorial, I was advised by a number of people more knowledgeable of these things, to work closely with the Mayor of Fromelles, Monsieur Hubert Huchette, in order to pinpoint a suitable site for the Memorial. Initially this seemed to be working and a piece of land alongside the Australian Memorial Park was identified for this purpose. Monsieur Huchette offered to identify and locate the landowner and to liaise with him on our behalf. More than two years later we are still pushing for some answers. Nothing has been forthcoming other than my accidental discovery that the landowner had died.

And whilst we wait? Each year on 9th May, and at our own (not inconsiderable) expense, we hold a service of remembrance at the Australian Memorial Park. These services were initially met with some opposition from senior members of the FWTM (Association Fromelles-Weppes – Terre de Mémoire 14-18), the Fromelles-based association which oversees the annual 19th July service. Our services are organised with the full approval of the Mayor and the FWTM is kept apprised of the service details and invited to jointly host the services (which it refuses to do, although a few members do work with us independently). Members of the Commune de Fromelles are actively encouraged by the British families to attend. Despite this, we have been told by the Vice President of the FWTM that we “have no right to organise a private service”. The President of the FWTM has also refused to work with our Association – “It will be impossible to work together side-by-side” - and he no longer attends our services.

Many of you will remember that in 2005 we were invited to attend a service of remembrance organised by the Mairie and the FWTM to mark the 90th anniversary of the Battle of Aubers Ridge. Imagine our shock and disappointment to have arrived in Fromelles only to be told that they had changed their minds and that there would be no service. This was compounded on 19th July 2006 when we attended the service to mark the 90th anniversary of the 1916 attack. We were invited to sing the Australian national anthem and the French national anthem, but not the British national anthem.

To use the Memorial Park, each year we must seek the permission of the Australians. At the end of each service, we must remove not only any litter which we have found there upon our arrival, but also the wreaths and floral tributes which we have laid during the service.

We have not asked for a gift; we have offered to purchase a suitable piece of land. The piece of ground gifted to the Australians in 1998 by the Commune de Fromelles (and which now forms the Australian Memorial Park) is the land on which the German lines were located and it was here, from 1914 onwards, that our men died in their thousands. We believe that this piece of land should not have been granted to one particular nation, but dedicated to the men of all nations who fell at Fromelles: the Fromelles Memorial Park.

Without a piece of land (suitably placed or otherwise) we are unable to erect the information panels which would tell the accurate Great War history of that part of France. As things currently stand, the only information panels to be found in this area, located within the Australian Memorial Park, relate to the 1916 Attack at Fromelles and focus almost solely on the Australian 5th Division with barely a mention of the British involvement.

There is no mention of anything prior to 19th July 1916. There is no mention of that amazing piece of our Great War heritage - the Christmas Truce of 1914 which occurred there. There is no mention of the Battle of Aubers Ridge, a battle which took place on that very piece of land; a battle which, yard for yard, mile for mile, division for division, saw the highest casualties for any engagement anywhere along the whole of the Western Front for the entire duration of the Great War; higher, even, than those sustained on the first day of the Somme.

Each year, many British visitors make the journey to Fromelles, a pilgrimage to find the place where their relative fought and died, but these visitors generally fail to pinpoint the correct location. There is nothing to say that the British were ever there. In the past, Australian visitors to the Park have insisted that we are wrong in our research; that only the Australians fought at Rouge-Bancs. Information panels detailing a complete and accurate history are vital.

Some of us have loaned items of great personal significance to the small Musée de Fromelles, a museum operated by the FWTM and situated in the attic above the Mairie. The Museum closed its doors for the last time on 9th December 2012. The contents of the Museum, including our possessions (our men's medals and letters home), are to be boxed-up and put into storage. At no point have we been approached by the FWTM to ask if we wished to have our items returned to us. In fact, we weren’t even informed that the Museum was closing. I am not only a fully paid-up member of the FWTM, but I am also its British Representative. I have received no correspondence from Fromelles other than the rare brief and often unhelpful answers to my requests for information.

The Committee for the new museum has already stated that 1914 and 1915 will not form any part of the “scenography”, so we know that these items will not be required in the future. And what of the artefacts found upon the battlefield at Rouge-Bancs (some taken in recent years from the bodies of the dead discovered on the battlefield) and held by the FWTM? Again, there will be no place for them within the new museum. Is there any reason why these items could not be offered to a British museum?

The new museum will not be a museum at all; it will be a visitor centre for the new Pheasant Wood Cemetery. It would seem that the land was gifted to the Australians, once again, with the building project being jointly funded by the Australians and the French. The visitor centre will focus purely on two days of Fromelles’ Great War history, that of 19th and 20th July 1916, the basis of its display being the archaeology of Pheasant Wood.

Despite the fact that the action which it will commemorate was never granted the title of “battle” by the Battles Nomenclature Committee, the “Battle” of Fromelles is how this visitor centre will be known. An historic inaccuracy from the start.

Although this action was a joint attack between the British 61st (South Midland) Division and the 5th Division of the Australian Imperial Force, the French Chairman of the Committee – Michel Borrewater –was quite clear in his answer (via the Australians) to my correspondence:




“During the discussion concerning the financing of the project, the Australian government agreed to be a partner, but no mention of a British contribution was made.”


“Ms Burbidge talks about the important periods (December 1914 and May 1915). These two periods are not part of the scenography and we cannot erase all the work completed thus far to include more sections.”


“However, it was always clear that the Fromelles museum would concentrate on the battle fought in July 1916 and not on World War 1. Moreover, the focus was going to be on the archaeological work in Pheasant Wood and the creation of a cemetery to honour the fallen of this battle.”


“In relation to the presence of British soldiers …………….. during a steering committee meeting I recall that the preferred choice was to show portraits of Australian soldiers only. Since then, some British soldiers have been chosen to feature among the 21 portraits. We will leave you [the Australians] the freedom to choose which portraits to display as long as the number does not increase.”


Monsieur Borrewater’s response also raises questions: How many of the twenty-one men to be featured will be British (I am told it will be three)? Which British soldiers will be portrayed? Who has supplied the research material for these men? I am still waiting for a response to these questions.

The argument that the British did not contribute funding for the visitor centre is simply not acceptable. A joint attack is a joint attack. One does not simply erase from history portions of a military engagement because one nation has not contributed significant funding. This attitude towards our men is morally wrong. Our men did not fight for a fee. They fought for what they believed to be a just cause.

If the new visitor centre is to reflect the archaeology of the site of the mass graves, then it is worth remembering that the British government came under considerable pressure from Australia to exhume and DNA test the men lying at Pheasant Wood, despite the fact that few of the men of the 61st Division would have been buried there. Nevertheless, Australia and Britain jointly funded the recovery of the 250 men from the burial site. Australia and Britain jointly funded the research and DNA testing necessary to identify those men and, through the CWGC, Australia and Britain funded the creation of the new Pheasant Wood Cemetery which now houses those 250 men. No British men have been, or are likely to be, identified. We have paid handsomely to help identify these men of the AIF, but it would seem even that wasn’t sufficient for our British men to be properly honoured in the village where they died.

And then, to top it all, this recently dropped into my mailbox. It was written and translated as an advertisement for the visitor centre by Claire Fillassiez who has been appointed as its new curator/director:




Les 19 et 20 juillet 1916, plus de 8500 hommes périssent lors de la Bataille de Fromelles. Parmi eux, 5500 Australiens sont venus du bout du monde pour combattre et mourir ici.


Plus qu’une simple explication des faits historiques, le nouveau Musée de la Bataille de Fromelles tisse les liens entre ce passé et le présent.


Découvrez des reconstitutions mettant en scène le matériel militaire retrouvé dans les anciennes tranchées de Fromelles.


Faites connaissance avec ces « soldats inconnus » Pour vous, ils passeront de l’ombre à la lumière.




On July 19th and 20th 1916, 5500 Australians soldiers came to fight and lose their lives during the Battle of Fromelles.


More than historic facts, the new Museum of the Battle of Fromelles links past and present.


Discover reconstructions with the military equipment found in the former trenches of Fromelles.


Meet « unknown soldiers »: for you, they will pass from the shadow in the light.



I’m sure you will understand when I say that this is unacceptable. The figures are grossly incorrect, the content differs between the French and English versions, the English could be better worded for what will be predominantly English-speaking visitors and there is no mention of the British. Why is this?

The vast proportion of our men have no known grave. There will be no “Pheasant Wood” for them. Unlike the Australians, the majority of these British soldiers are not commemorated on a memorial within the municipality of Fromelles or even in France. To pay their respects, these British families must travel northwards, over the border into Belgium to the Ploegsteert Memorial to the Missing, so remarks such as “We don’t need the British; we have the Australians” from Martial Delebarre can only aggravate an already difficult and painful situation.

The decisions taken in Fromelles are unacceptable and, combined with the attitude towards our men and their families, have succeeded in making the situation for the British untenable. As an association, our voice is not loud enough to be heard. I have therefore asked the All-Party Parliamentary War Heritage Group, The Western Front Association and the Royal British Legion to afford us its official support.

There has to be a way out of this terrible situation and I am determined that we will find it. It’s very important to remember that we do have good and supportive friends in Fromelles, in particular Régine and Gervais Houvenaghel and the wonderful Carole Laignel. These friends have never let us down.


V.

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Well said Victoria,

it's important to remember the men who gave their lives

we made a promise to remember them - ALL of them - and that's all that we want - each man to be remembered regardless of race, nationality or rank.

Mark.

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V.

You have my full support as per my email sent to you today confirms. Please feel free to use my respectful alternate solution in it's entirety or by part if required.

Best of luck.

Chris

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The Curator says there were 5500 Australian dead???

Give me strength.

Yep! I have offered her my assistance with historical facts and English translations. I also offered suitable wording for her advertisement:

“On 19
th
and 20
th
July 1916, two divisions – the 5
th
Division Australian Imperial Force and the British 61
st
(South Midland) Division – assembled in the trenches at Fromelles. Forty-Eight hours later, over 450 British soldiers and almost 2,000 soldiers of the AIF were dead amongst a total of nearly 7,000 casualties.

More than simple historic facts, the new Museum of the Battle of Fromelles links the past with the present.

View reconstructions using military equipment discovered in the old trenches of Fromelles.

Come and meet these unknown soldiers and watch their stories pass from shadow into light.”

I didn't want to alter her wording (it's her advertisement, after all), but it can't possibly be published as it stands! Haven't had any response, as yet, nor am I expecting one .............

Mark and Chris, thank you for your support. Chris, I'll get back to you by Monday - promise.

V.

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Thank you for a calm and thoughtful post Victoria. It is truly sad to see such a course of events, and such distortion, whatever the motives.

Keith

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A sad state of affairs. You have my greatest sympathy Victoria.

It sounds as if a political solution is required but I am not sure how that can be reached.

Neil

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Well said Victoria, it would seem that the British dead of the 61st Division are simply to be air brushed out of the whole matter relating to July 1916, let alone the many many men of the 2nd Rifle Brigade and other Regiments involved in the Battle of Aubers Ridge that died on exactly the same piece of land, exactly the same land!!!, or the 1914 dead. As you correctly point out

The curator's ignorance of facts does not bode well at all, personally I feel that the Australian Memorial Park should be devoted to ALL that died in that area and do find it morally wrong that other nations soldiers that have died at Fromelles have been deleted from history, a sad sad reflection on those involved.

As you have correctly pointed out, the action of July 1916 was never given the title of a battle and yet the men of the Battle of Aubers Ridge are to be forgotten by historical inaccuracies on the part of Fromelles and the Australians, how convenient and a damn disgrace.

Andy

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You could also add to that, Andy, the fact that the German attack on 9 April 1918 also crossed that very same ground.

I find this terribly sad and really rather shocking. I'm hearing more and more of Australian (and Canadian, to some extent) efforts in France and Belgium with regard to the centenary and it seems that the Brits - not to mention the Indians, French, Germans and Belgians - are lagging behind the PR machine.

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Thank you Chris, I am not as up to speed, for 1918 in the area, as I would like to be!!

As you say, terribly sad and rather shocking.

Andy

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Well said Chris. This issue has been unfortunately rumbling away for several years now as V will confirm. The solution was to offer all nations who fought here equal and truthful input with a desire to commemorate all who fell here. Unfortunately, a desire has arose from certain quarters to remove, ignore and replace historical facts for reasons only they will be aware of. Tis such a shame!

Where does V go from here? Where do we go from here? Perhaps it is too late. One only has to drive into Fromelles as I did last week and see the huge amount of Australian input. The local cafe is an Aussie shrine, the school has been re-named after the 5th Div and it's Cobbers Memorial and more.

Perhaps the fault is with us Brits?

Maybe if we threw shed loads of money into the British cause and then there is that word patriotism.

Is the British political will there as it clearly is with the Australians? I think not.

I fear much of the blame for this sorry situation is with the local authorities. They should have recognised the shortfalls of adulation for whatever reasons offered to one side whilst ignoring all others who fought and fell here.

I believe perhaps the final solution may rest with the Australians. If they put the brakes on the locals one sided story and insist on commemration for all in equal truthful amounts, then only then may the authorities prevent all respect and dignity being lost from this blood soaked multi nation battlefield. Lest We Forget.

We shall see, but I won't hold my breath!

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I have heard rumours that the French want to commemorate Neuve Chapelle in 1915 - excellent. However, apart from the French, this would only involve the Indians. I did suggest that the Bangladeshis, Pakistanis and other modern nations that comprise 'British' India might have a take on this, not to mention the British contribution in terms of officers within the Indian regiments and, of course, the numerous British regiments that formed part of the Indian Corps.

Oh dear, I can see problems... To be fair, the Canadians are well aware of others fighting on their sites and the Guides at BH and Vimy do their best...

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It's where the money & glory lies.

We do sfa to commemorate our GW dead (politically) & the Aussies move mountains.I admire that & it puts our lot to shame.

I don't see why the Aussies should share the Cobber site with us as we put nothing into it at the start.That they would if asked...I have no doubts that they'd say yes but it's still our fault.We have this Somme /Ypres thing that puts places like Fromelles out of sight from the general Brit public.The French knowingly or unwittingly cash in on this,throw street parties & inflate pretty balloons anytime Australia is mentioned.Not the Aussies fault.

I have two simple answers to this.Do as they do,throw a few medals at officials,pile the 100th anni cash into France (& Belgium.There is life outside of Ypres) & keep it out of the UK.

The second answer is French press.We need to have them at events like Rouges Bancs,9th May.Make people aware. This works.There was more coverage here locally for the burials last tuesday at Ecoust than for anything already past (close even to 1st july 2006,but that was national here) Brit wise.This even put the mayor of Bullecourt's nose out of joint ,it being so close to ANZAC day & there being big coverage at Ecoust & not his town.A win for us!

Having said that,it'll never happen.

They're already trying to airbrush out most of our involvement at D Day.

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If the dead are watching and listening to this development I wonder what they will make of all of this?

But here's the rub. A big percentage of those buried AIF men within Pheasant Wood CWGC Cemetery & elsewhere buried locally were born and brought up in Great Britain and are hence Brits.

Just read their epitaphs and you will be surprised how many fall into that catagory.

Revealed on one of the AIF head stones. I quote:

"Red lips are not so red as the stained stones kissed by the English dead" He of course being British but fell alongside his Aussie mates and British comrades.

What would certain French officials know of this??

No amount of spin or mischeif can remove the facts, but they can hide or amend them for political gain or reward. I live in hope that one day, sanity with respect for the collective fallen will prevail.

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It's where the money & glory lies.

We do sfa to commemorate our GW dead (politically) & the Aussies move mountains.I admire that & it puts our lot to shame.

I don't see why the Aussies should share the Cobber site with us as we put nothing into it at the start.

Dave,

Was it not the case that the British paid 50% of all the DNA testing and for the burial of these Australian soldiers. I am not sure who bore the full cost of the initial survey and site excavation at Pheasant Wood??

Valid point regarding the Memorial Park itself, I believe donated to the Australians by the people of France. No mention or thought of the thousands of other soldiers from other nations that died there.

So the British having effectively having swallowed 50% of the cost, not insignificant, the land once again for the visitors centre is donated to the Australians, and yet it would appear that the British and other nations involvement in the area is to be conveniently forgotten!!

Andy

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When I first became involved with the museum project at Fromelles ~25 years ago it was already clear that the aim was to commemorate the experience of the village and inhabitants in the Great War and WW2. Even from the early days there was recognition of the 1915 action on Aubers Ridge and artefacts in the museum and interests of visitors reflected this aspect. Then came the two significant influences on the area a) the desire of the Australian Govt to commemorate Australia on the Western Front (having finally realised that there were theatres of war after Gallipoli); and B) the discovery of the grave on the edge of Pheasant Wood. These events imposed quite a responsibility/burden on the village and my suspicion is that a further wave of commemoration (of the 1915 action) simply cannot be sustained by the village/commune. Moreover, 'British' commemoration on the Western Front was largely satisfied by the many memorials erected post-1918 whereas the Australian have followed much later and have now caught up but have done so in a manner that differs from the immediate post war approach i.e. memorials/memorial parks (Le Hamel, Bullecourt and Fromelles). Initiating commemoration of the 1915 action on the scale proposed arguably should have been done 10-15 years ago at this particular location. It seems that if you have not got the locals on your side you are not going to succeed. This issue also raises the question whether there is over-commemoration on the Western Front - just because we have the resources to build memorial and run events does it justify them? Who will maintain them in the future?.....and so on.

PS - not sure how that smiley face got on there - ignore it.

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V

Thanks for posting this, although it is very depressing. I read your post through a link posted on WW2talk.

My great-grandfather was killed on 9 May 1915 (somewhere near the Cinder Track at Richebourg most probably, but we'll never really know) with the Black Watch (1st or 2nd - even that isn't clear). There's no grave and all the family have is "Carmichael C." carved on a panel on the Le Touret Memorial.

Although he died in the southern battle, I feel he wouldn't have considered the northern sector was of no interest.

While I have no problem with there being a memorial for the Australians who died just over a year later, it is a disgrace to ignore the part played in that battle by British troops. And to ignore the wider context and history is an insult to the dead of all nations (British, Indian, French, Canadian, New Zealander and, yes, Australian too) and to their descendents. There isn't even a memorial to the Battle of Aubers Ridge as far as I know.

I have a feeling that a memorial to the British that ignored the Australians would be met with very loud "Not bloody likely mate!" from our antipodean brethern.

You have my full support for what it's worth and if you need names on a petition or anything else, let me know. As well as approaching our parliamentarians, might there be some benefit in approaching the Australians (either their embassy in the UK or their government in Canberra)? As someone else has posted above, many of those who died thought themselves British even though in the AIF. And there are Australians - like some of my own family - whose ancestors fought and died on 9 May 1915 as soldiers in British regiments. Maybe if the French won't play ball with us, they might listen to the Australians.

Sorry if you've already considered or indeed tried this - I'm a latecomer to all this!

Good luck and don't give in!

Cheers

Ian

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I sympathise with Victoria's position although am a little disappointed in her rather broad use of the word 'Australians' when pointing the finger of blame.

The museum is primarily focussed on the 1916 battle because it was Australia's first major action on the Western Front. It is being funded by the Australian Govt as part of the centenary Australian Remembrance Trail. Of course the British involved should be given equal recognition - there's no argument from me about that. And yes, it should probably also include some overall information about what occurred in the Fromelles area during the entire war (including earlier/later battles) but specifically it is about the 1916 battle and explains the Pheasant Wood discovery.

I don't want to start any kind of argument but it does sometimes seem that there are those who use Australia's passion for its Anzac history as a scapegoat for their own Government lack of funding and community lack of interest (not that anyone's done that yet on this thread but it has appeared in the past). I'm not about to apologise for Australians naturally focussing their 'remembrance' on past generations of Australians. Why shouldn't we? Yes, there is an element of the 'Anzac myth' still getting around among the public but it's gradually changing and the facts are winning out. And besides, I'd much rather that, than public apathy.

Andy, the funding for the initial non-invasive examination and later test dig was contributed by the Australian Department of Defence.

I also noticed two interesting takes on the same set of circumstances by Andy and Chris. Andy was indicating that the British paid 50% of the cost for the exhumations and DNA testing and yet have received no real reward for it and are being forgotten while Chris has pointed out the fact that, although in the AIF, quite a proportion of the men buried at Pheasant Wood were British born and raised. So do we either accept the British contribution as justified and rewarded or are those British born men to be considered Australian? :whistle:

Cheers,

Tim L.

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So I take it then that the "Australians" as you put it are totally air brushing the 61st Division from the entire so called "Battle of Fromelles" then, somewhat of a misleading statement as it was not a battle or recognised as such.

Andy

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This situation raises a number of moral issues - the apparent willingness by some to distort the historical facts is certainly questionable at the very least.

I think most people fully understand that the visitor centre is there primarily to commemorate the AIFs 1916 action at Fromelles, and would have no issue with that given where the funding came from. However, it also has a responsibility to put that action in context - and part of that is telling the story of what happened in that area during the rest of the Great War.

It would be nice to think that the sacrifices of all of those who fought and died in that vicinity will be remembered, and future generations can learn of the tumultuous events that took place there during the years 1914 to 1918, and not just in July 1916. Surely that is the very least that we can do for those who died there, and for the most part still lie in the fields near the Australian Memorial Park?

Mark

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The Fromelles area attracts greater funding from the the Australian Government compared to the British Government. It also attracts more attention from senior Australian political figures. It is not terribly surprising that, as a result, minor local officials favour the Australians.

That is not the fault of the Australians and we Brits do a pretty good job ourselves of ignoring/down playing the French contribution in the Great War so are not really in a position to criticise. However, it will be interesting to see if the 1916 Museum manages to ignore the British involvement on one hand whilst, at the same time, blaming all the failure on the British High Command!!

What annoys me is the apparent hostility from the mayor and FWTM to any commemoration of British involvement in the area for 1914-18. That makes no sense to me.

Neil

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So I take it then that the "Australians" as you put it are totally air brushing the 61st Division from the entire so called "Battle of Fromelles" then, somewhat of a misleading statement as it was not a battle or recognised as such.

Andy

Andy, if that's in response to my post then I have no idea what you're on about. Can't see anywhere that I've said 'Australians' are air-brushing anything - you said that. I don't actually know what is going to be included in the museum but as I pointed out I'd think it only right that the British are given equal recognition. What part of that didn't you understand in my post?

And whether it's officially classed as a battle, attack, skirmish, raid or world championship wrestling bout makes absolutely no difference to what happened there. (as a point of interest on this, it was first referred to as a 'battle' in Australian newspapers three days after it occurred).

If you've ever visited the Australian Memorial Park at Fromelles, you may have read this plaque......yep, it includes the British participation.

post-2918-0-99363700-1367154194_thumb.jp

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Thank you Tim, I have visited the memorial Park on many occasion and even had to fire up my laptop (more than once), and I am not the only one that has had to do this, when asked by visiting Australians who I was remembering, as they did not believe me when I said that I was here to remember the men of the 2nd Rifle Brigade as well as the many others that died there.

To say that they were gobsmacked when I showed them all the details of the 9/5/15 attack was putting it mildly, for some reason no-one mentions this very costly battle, an Australian only ATTACK it would seem to be in Australian eyes, yes I do find the convenient Battle of Fromelles misleading historically as well as the curators misleading figures.

Andy

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Andy,

there are people in every country that either know its military history or don't. The ones of us who do, KNOW that the English were there ... even I do and I am the one who publically states that battles and battalions make my eyes glaze over!!!!.

Accusing Australians of 'airbrushing' based on one encounter with someone who obviously does not know their country's own military history is hardly a fair summation.

As it is coming up for the centenary I would certainly hope that the French and the Brits are able to eat humble pie and reach a place of better understanding so they can remember what it is that they have to be thankful for ... it is much!!!!!

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I am sorry, you seem to have missed the point totally!!

There is no accusation of airbrushing because of the encounter's on the Memorial Park with people that do not know what happened there before the A.I.F. & 61st Divisions attack or after the A.I.F. had left the area, more than willing to help them a little especially when they do not believe you because of the way 1916 has been handled or portrayed especially by the press. Or that an Australian guide took exception to a little talk regarding the pre - A.I.F. events in the area to a small handful of British, whilst guiding some Australians around the Park.

The airbrushing is mentioned in posts in this thread.

Andy

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