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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Lizzie Morrison


alfylfc

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Can anyone help me with information on a nurse who died in the war - her name was Lizzie Morrison and it is believed she died of illness in Salonika.

She came from the Killead area of County Antrim but I'm afraid this is all the information I have on her.

Is there a roll of honour for nurses or maybe someone I can contact for more info?

Thanks, Alvin

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You have obviously got the name off the Crumlin War Memorial. I have little more about her except that she may (I stress, MAY) have been the Lizzie N. Morrison whose death was registered in the 3rd quarter of 1918 in Brentford, England. This is the only Lizzie Morrison whose death is in the English/Welsh death register but, of course, she could have died in Ireland. There seems to be plenty of Lizzie Morrisons in the Irish 1901/11 censii. Her name is not recorded on the York Minster panels. How do you know that she was from the Killead area?

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There is a Lizzie Mill Morrison who served in Serbia as an orderly with the America Unit of the Scottish Women's Hospital from 4th August 1916 until 1st May 1917. I have no note of her dying while employed with the unit, though that doesn't mean that she didn't.

Sue

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Thanks for your replies.

Lizzie Morrison is on the Killead Presbyterian Church Roll of Honour and it is known that she was from the Morrison farming family in the Killead area.

Crumlin is a nearby village and that is why she appears on its war memorial. I can't find her on the 1901 or 1911 census and there is no documented information about her.

I was told by a member of the Killead church that she died while working as a nurse in Salonika, but there is nothing to confirm this and the Morrison's no longer live in the area.

She is the only woman from the Antrim (town) district to be named among the locals who died in the war and I am keen to include her in a book I am writing about Antrim during the Great War.

I will follow-up on your information and hopefully get something definite about this lady.

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Jim - that was my first port of call when doing my research and Lizzie was not on it. I can only presume this was because she was not a member of the armed forces. None of the Eddies lists in the Antrim area carry the names of nurses, or indeed any women.

She is on the list of fallen on the church memorial, and more importantly, as I found out last night, she is also among the names of those from the church who served, beside her name it says "Hospital Work Salonika".

I have photos of the fallen list and those who served, but I'm afraid I don't know how to attach them on this post from my desktop, so if you can give me a few instructions I can do this, or PM me with your email address.

I have also found out that her name is on the Morrison family headstone at the church - as Eliza Neill Morrison, died 2 July 1918, aged 30. Of course, this ties in with your first post and it is almost definitely the same person. So why would she be in Brentford?

Her birth in 1888 is registered in the Antrim district, which covers Killead.

It is strange that there are no Morrisons in the Killead area in the 1901 or 1911 census - on the list of parishoners who served there is Thomas and Kennedy Morrison, with both in the Canadian forces. This could mean that the Morrisons, including Lizzie, emigrated before the war.

The mystery continues. Alvin

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Alvin, maybe this family 1901 Irish Census.

Morrison Eliza Neill 12 Female Daughter Presbyterian

http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1901/Antrim/Ballyrobin/Crookedstone/915946/

Walter

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Eldest son seems to have taken on the farm with a new wife and mother, sister-in-law and two children (including Lizzy) moved into Antrim.

http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Antrim/Windsor_Ward/Lisburn_Road/169502/

I have found a medal card which I believe relates to her. This is to Lizzie N. Morrison, an orderly with the French Red Cross. We need to get a peek at the card and see if it gives details as to where she served and when. But I am confident that we are on the right trail. I am less confident that the Lizzie N. Morrison whose death was registered in the third quarter 1918 in Brentford is the same one. But it could be as the age at 30 at her death suggests a birth date of 1888 and this falls in nicely with the census of 1901 giving her as aged 12. Alvin, I would really welcome what photographs that you have being attached to an email sent to jimstrawbridge AT coinsale.fsnet.co.uk

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The French Red Cross medal roll includes members of the Scottish Women's Hospital, and I assume that the medal card refers to the same woman I mentioned earlier in the thread, but with the middle name mis-transcribed.

Sue

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Jim/Sue,

I think Lizzie Morrison has finally been located, thanks to your help.

Is there any way of accessing her medal card from the French Red Cross?

I still don't know how she died or whether it was attributable to the war, but the only Lizzie N Morrison who died in this period, and who fits in with the information we have, is the lady in Brentford.

Sue, was she working for the French Red Cross and was attached to the Scottish Women's Hospital, or the other way round?

Jim, I have sent you an email with the photos I mentioned.

Thanks again, Alvin.

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Alvin

Many members of the Scottish Women's Hospital were recruited through the British Committee of the French Red Cross in London, though the two had no direct link - the British Committee acted as a go-between. You can download her medal index card here:

Lizzie Morrison

However, the SWH members just happen to be included on the French Red Cross medal roll and you still need to check the roll at The National Archives to see the details. I have the FRC medal roll here minus a few pages which, unfortunately, cover that part of the SWH. I will remember to photograph the missing pages when I'm next able - I should have done it some time ago!

Sue

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These are the Civil Parishes in the Brentford Registration District in 1918. All in Middlesex.

Do any of them ring any bells or strike any chords to explain why Lizzie could have been there?

Acton, Chiswick, Ealing, Greenford, Hanwell, Heston, Heston & Isleworth, Isleworth, New Brentford, Old Brentford, Perivale, Twickenham, West Twyford.

CGM

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I'm having trouble coping with PDF image so until then, I believe the entries are:

MORRISON Lizzie N

French RX Orderly

Victory FRX/101 B/6 Page 301 or possibly 304

British Do Do

Star

Theatre of War First served in 2A

Date of Entry 8-16

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Sue/CGM,

Thanks for your help - can you please confirm the facts as I understand them before I put them to print.

Lizzie Neill Morrison, while recruited through the French Red Cross, was an orderly with the America Unit of the Scottish Women's Hospital, serving in Serbia from 4th August 1916 until 1st May 1917.

She was awarded Victory and British medals. My only concern is that the church memorial states that she worked in Salonika. Her medal card states that the first theatre of war she served in was 2A - can someone decode this please?

Sue, is it possible that while based in Serbia she may have worked for a short period in Salonika?

She was born in Killead, County Antrim, and was living on the Lisburn Road in Belfast in 1911 (census).

Lizzie died on 2nd July 1918, aged 30, in Brentford. There is no information as yet on the cause of death or whether it was attributable to the war.

Alvin.

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The city of Salonika was the base for operations in Macedonia, which straddles present northern Greece and the Former Yugoslavia. Serbia / Servia had expanded her territory to include this region in the Balkan Wars.

Salonika has become a catch-all term for operations in the Balkan region.

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The America Unit arrived in Salonika in mid-August 1916, and was there for two weeks before moving up to Ostrovo, so her first steps were definitely taken in Salonika. And although the French Red Cross was used as a clearing house for personnel proceeding overseas, to vet and approve them, there were other ways to join the Scottish Women's Hospital direct. However she joined, she would still appear on the French Red Cross medal roll - but I honestly don't know all the details of recruitment and joining.

Sue

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Sue/CGM,

............Lizzie died on 2nd July 1918, aged 30, in Brentford. ..........Alvin.

I don't think this is proven, but I am looking into it. I will come back when I have some information, if you can wait for it.

CGM

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Thanks to everyone who has replied to my original post - the response has been fantastic and I can now tell the story of Lizzie Morrison's service during the war in my book.

CGM, you are right, I have to confirm that the woman who died in Brentford is indeed the same person. The book is not out until next year (to coincide with the 2014 centenary) so there's no rush and any information will be gratefully received.

Alvin

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..............I have also found out that her name is on the Morrison family headstone at the church - as Eliza Neill Morrison, died 2 July 1918, aged 30. Of course, this ties in with your first post and it is almost definitely the same person. So why would she be in Brentford?

....The mystery continues. Alvin

There is a tiny niggle in the back of my mind, which is - have you checked burial records to be sure that she is not buried in this grave.

Just a thought....

CGM

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CGM I think that there are 19 names on this memorial and they won't all be buried there. It seems to be a family memorial in the churchyard rather than a grave marker.

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