Jump to content
Free downloads from TNA ×
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

4th Alexandra Princess of Wales Own (Yorkshire Regt.) & 1/5th York


anthony osborne

Recommended Posts

Am researching the likely movements/service of 2 more local lads (who do not appear on the war memorial or roll of honour) and am again looking for some expert help please. The 2 men in question and their battalions are as follows:

Name: Frederick Stanley Fitzhugh Birth Place: West Haddon, Northampton Residence: Swinford, Rugby Death Date: 27 May 1918 Death Location: France & Flanders Enlistment Location: Glen Parva Rank: Private Regiment: Alexandra, Princess of Wales's Own (Yorkshire Regiment) Battalion: 4th Battalion Number: 43670 Type of Casualty: Killed in action Theatre of War: Western European Theatre Comments:

Formerly 71100, 87Th T.R. Battn.

And

Name: Henry Robinson Birth Place: West Haddon, Northants Death Date: 13 Feb 1917 Death Location: France & Flanders Enlistment Location: Sheffield Rank: Private Regiment: York and Lancaster Regiment Battalion: 1/5th (T.F.) Battalion Number: 7589 Type of Casualty: Died of wounds Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

Looking for some more detail on their likely movements with their respective battalions if anyone has easy access to the war diaries please.

Service records do not exist so any other details anyone can provide would be gratefully received.

Many, many thanks all,

Ant.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ant

Re 4Yorks I have this

26th/27th May.

At night on the 26th the Btn were back in the Front line with the 4th East Yorks on their left and the other Brigades of the Division to the right.

Suddenly at 1 a.m the German line leapt into flame with a bombardment by 4,000 Artillery pieces, that was said to be the most violent the 50th Division had ever experienced.

To the "ordinary" shells were added gas shells of four kinds - lachrymatory, sneezing, lethal and thermits.

The D.L.I reported that all their trenches had been levelled.

Most of the British Artillery batteries were taken out of action and telephone communication lost.

The shelling continued until 4.30 a.m. At 3.30 a.m through the morning mist and smoke the German Infantry began to advance behind a line of tanks.

They were met by a hail of fire which forced them behind the tanks.

The Germans broke through in many parts and by 6.30 the 150th Brigade found they had been outflanked on both sides.

No news was received from the 4th East Yorks, very few of whose men came back.

"The 150th Brigadier Gen Rees intended to hold the line with the 4th Yorks, but at 7.am discovered that they too had been overwhelmed on the line Mt Hermel-Tr Dehard and the enemy was fast approaching his HQ."

4th Yorks Diary - "Btn took up a support position round Craonelle and La Hutte.

Enemy bombardment started about 1 a.m. Heavy gas shelling as far back as Maizy.

The enemy broke through on our left and pushed on towards Beaurieux arriving there about 10 a.m.

The enemy also came through on our right using tanks over the flat country to the East of Craonne.

This party also pushed on towards Beaurieux and surrounded the Brigade in the line.

The enemy then pushed on towards Maizy.

All troops in Maizy and the few who had got out of Beaurieux then made a stand on the hills to the South of the village.

At about 11.15 a.m. these troops were withdrawn from this position.

The next position was held at Glennes and later a line on the hill North of Fismes." Divisional History - "No less than 227 Officers and 4,879 other ranks were killed, wounded or captured during the battle.

Practically all those casualties occurring on the 27th, for after that date the 50th Division became intermingled with other Divisions, which were in a like condition; only a mere handful of the Infantry remained." 87 Men of the 4th Yorks Btn were killed in action this day.

28th MAY. Diary - "About 4 a.m. the enemy broke through and the party [the few who were left, who had been making a stand on the hills to the South of Beaurieux] withdrew with the French on to Fismes. This party, after using all ammunition were then told to report to Div HQ near Arcis Le Ponsart, where they rested for the night."

and for 5Y&L I have this

post-10072-0-75773400-1360768825_thumb.j

post-10072-0-45112100-1360768839_thumb.j

Regards,

Graeme

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good evening Ant.

The closest I can pin this down as to your chaps wounding whilst serving with the 1/5th Yorks & Lancs is between the 6th - 12th February 1917, latter date when they were relieved by the 5th KOYLI.

I will quote the War Diary with the men now occupying the Bailleulval/Basseux Sectors (south of the Arras-Doullens Road).

Relieved 5th KOYLI in Left Sub Sector of Bde. front again; trenches very dry but ground too frozen for excavating work. Three Coys in front and support lines, D Coy at Panets Post, support.

Two sections per Coy patrolling nightly for excercise

Casualties four

Hope that provides you with some information that may be of some use.

Best wishes.

Chris.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Graeme/Chris,

thanks both for your help - very much appreciated.

I can now work backwards to their likely enlistment date and piece together their likely service history.

Once again many, many thanks.

Ant

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

I have a query for a 5th Yorks man who died in Sept 1918 after the Bn had been transferred to the 116th Brigade, 39th Division

Can anyone tell me where the Bn were at this time, ideally a war diary extract.

Here is the details of George Blenco

Birth Place: Copt, Hewick, Yorks

Death Date: 19 Sep 1918

Death Location: France & Flanders

Enlistment Location: Ripon

Rank: Private

Regiment: Alexandra, Prince of Wales's Own (Yorkshire Regiment)

Battalion: 5th Battalion

Number: 34124

Type of Casualty: Died

Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

Comments: Formerly 28930, Lincs Regt.

Curiously the MIC says Labour Corp not Lincs Regt for previous Bn

Blenco+George+William+1880+BritishArmyWWIMedalRollsIndexCards19141920_121567148.jpg

Thanks for any help.

Roger

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Roger,

I'm no expert on the Yorks but i would imagine you man died of influenza (just a guess). The SDGW records 'died' which is usually from illness or accident.

On 20 August 1918 the battalion marched to New Camp near Le Touquet, Lewis Gun School, where remained training for rest of month.

Then for September I have

5th Battn cadre at Stella-Plage Camp for remainder of the war doing Training, Recreation, Working Parties and Tactical schemes for Officers. Remainder transferred to other Units.

Regards,

Graeme

Link to comment
Share on other sites

George Blenco died in enemy hands as a prisoner of war

regards Ray

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bill Danby's website which includes the 5th Yorks can be found here

regards Ray

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ray, Graeme,

Thanks for the info and link. I had googled for hours and didn't find this great Staffs website so Thks.

Ray, How do you know he died in enemy hands ?

Roger

whoops meant Yorks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ray, Graeme,

Thanks for the info and link. I had googled for hours and didn't find this great Staffs website so Thks.

Ray, How do you know he died in enemy hands ?

Roger

whoops meant Yorks!

Roger

The clue to George having died as a prisoner of war is his burial location

extract from the CWGC

Location Information

The village of Glageon is about 3 kilometres west of Trelon, 11 kilometres south-east of Avesnes and 56 kilometres east of Cambrai. The Communal Cemetery and Extension lie west of the village.

Historical Information

Glageon village was in German occupation during practically the whole of the War.

The Communal Cemetery was used for the burial of German soldiers and Allied prisoners from September, 1914, to August, 1918; the Extension was then begun, and was used until the following October. The German, American and Italian and a number of French graves have now been removed from both burial grounds; but the British and Russian graves remain.

There are now over 300, 1914-18 war casualties commemorated in this site. Of these, over 10 are unidentified.

The Extension covers an area of 2,202 square metres.

George is also listed on Bills website as having died as a prisoner of war (page 22)

Regards Ray

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ray,

Thanks for that , Very helpful.

Roger

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yardley,

brilliant - thanks very much for the link.

Ant

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yardley,

thanks for posting - spot on!

All the best,

Ant

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...